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E4300 and 650i overclocking

Discussion in 'Overclocking' started by Phil Weldon, Mar 24, 2007.

  1. Phil Weldon

    Fishface Guest

    That would be for the dual core, not the quad core, I
    presume. I'd guess they're trying to cut their losses...
     
    Fishface, Apr 15, 2007
    #61
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  2. Phil Weldon

    Phil Weldon Guest

    **** Intel E4300 @ 3 GHz, 1333 MHz FSB, 1066 memory bus
    (1.41 VDC CPU core, 1.80 VDC memory)

    The CPU and chipset fans were set to 100%.
    Intel boxed-retail heatsink/fan w/ zinc oxide in ester base thermal grease.
    No case fans were used.
    The case side was open.

    nVidia Control Panel Stability Test
    'Verify the stability of the following' (settings)
    CPU
    Memory
    PCI-E bus
    GPU



    IDLE Temperatures:
    Room ambient: 21 C
    CPU: 32 C
    System (chipset?): 36 C
    GPU: 52 C
    Stability Test temperatures, 6 hour run
    Room ambient temperature: 21 C
    CPU: 47 C
    System (chipset?): 37 C
    GPU: 61 C

    I did not intend the CPU core voltage to be above stock; in the BIOS I had
    set it to [AUTO], but (as I noticed AFTER the 6 hour run) nVidia was
    reporting the CPU core voltage as 1.41 VDC.

    Has nVidia made overclocking harder by trying to make it easier?
    Well, back to the manuals B^(

    Phil Weldon
     
    Phil Weldon, Apr 15, 2007
    #62
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  3. Phil Weldon

    Fishface Guest

    That temperature seems mighty low for a fully loaded dual core at 3 GHz
    with stock cooling, especially at that voltage. Did you try the Orthos to
    which I linked? That essentially runs an instance of Prime 95 torture test
    on each core.

    How fast is your fan turning? My stock Intel HSF that came with the
    E6400 doesn't ever turn faster than around 1700 RPM, for some
    reason. I even tried shorting pin 4 (PWM) to 12v as suggested by
    someone, and it still turned at 1700. To its credit, it is at least quiet.
     
    Fishface, Apr 15, 2007
    #63
  4. Phil Weldon

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'Fishface' wrote:
    | That temperature seems mighty low for a fully loaded dual core at 3 GHz
    | with stock cooling, especially at that voltage. Did you try the Orthos to
    | which I linked? That essentially runs an instance of Prime 95 torture
    test
    | on each core.
    |
    | How fast is your fan turning? My stock Intel HSF that came with the
    | E6400 doesn't ever turn faster than around 1700 RPM, for some
    | reason. I even tried shorting pin 4 (PWM) to 12v as suggested by
    | someone, and it still turned at 1700. To its credit, it is at least
    quiet.

    | I too was surprised by the low CPU temperatures, but it was the nVidia
    Stability test. I have downloaded the Orthos test you suggested, but
    haven't installed it yet - I don't have antivirus/antimalware protection
    installed on the system, and I don't want to network it until I do. The
    trouble with the PCI IDE card prevents me from easily transferring the
    downloads, but I just got a USB 2.0 outboard enclosure for the 300 GByte
    drive that has all my documents and downloads. I should be installing
    Orthos soon, and will post a report. After than I am going to take two
    steps back and try to figure out what the EVGA 680i motherboard BIOS will do
    'behind your back.' Also I need to find a better way to keep track of
    temperatures, voltages, and fan speeds; some reading I can't get, some seem
    unreliable, and none are as convenient as Motherboard Monitor (which
    unfortunately is no longer being maintained or updated.)

    I have seen CPU fan speed as low as 1100 rpm and as high as 1800 rpm. I
    just have no confidence that is real. I also notice that the EVGA 8800 GTS
    fan is VERY slow, perhaps only a few hundred rpm. It is very quiet and
    seemingly handles the power dissipation of the nVidia Stability test with a
    GPU temperature of 35 to 40 C above ambient.

    More later.

    Phil Weldon

    | Phil Weldon wrote:
    | > **** Intel E4300 @ 3 GHz, 1333 MHz FSB, 1066 memory bus
    | > (1.41 VDC CPU core, 1.80 VDC memory)
    | >
    | > The CPU and chipset fans were set to 100%.
    | > Intel boxed-retail heatsink/fan w/ zinc oxide in ester base thermal
    grease.
    | > No case fans were used.
    | > The case side was open.
    | >
    | > nVidia Control Panel Stability Test
    | > 'Verify the stability of the following' (settings)
    | > CPU
    | > Memory
    | > PCI-E bus
    | > GPU
    | >
    | >
    | >
    | > IDLE Temperatures:
    | > Room ambient: 21 C
    | > CPU: 32 C
    | > System (chipset?): 36 C
    | > GPU: 52 C
    | > Stability Test temperatures, 6 hour run
    | > Room ambient temperature: 21 C
    | > CPU: 47 C
    |
    | That temperature seems mighty low for a fully loaded dual core at 3 GHz
    | with stock cooling, especially at that voltage. Did you try the Orthos to
    | which I linked? That essentially runs an instance of Prime 95 torture
    test
    | on each core.
    |
    | How fast is your fan turning? My stock Intel HSF that came with the
    | E6400 doesn't ever turn faster than around 1700 RPM, for some
    | reason. I even tried shorting pin 4 (PWM) to 12v as suggested by
    | someone, and it still turned at 1700. To its credit, it is at least
    quiet.
    |
    |
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Apr 16, 2007
    #64
  5. Phil Weldon

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'Phil Weldon' wrote, in part:
    | I did not intend the CPU core voltage to be above stock; in the BIOS I had
    | set it to [AUTO], but (as I noticed AFTER the 6 hour run) nVidia was
    | reporting the CPU core voltage as 1.41 VDC.
    |
    | Has nVidia made overclocking harder by trying to make it easier?
    | Well, back to the manuals B^(
    _____

    Found through a diligent search of the EVGA site (actually, it was a newly
    posted FAQ) that the version of nTune that ships with the EVGA 680i SLI
    should be uninstalled and replaced with a newer version from nVidia (9.53)
    which will fix the BIOS settings changing behind your back problem
    My BIOS settings on my 680i motherboards are being changed/reset on
    some boots/restarts.

    Question / Issue

    My BIOS settings on my 680i motherboards are being changed/reset on
    some boots/restarts.



    Answer / Solution

    In most cases people who have experienced this problem were using the
    nTune software that came on the 680i driver installation CD. It is
    recommended to uninstall this version of nTune via Add/Remove Programs in
    the control panel. If you plan to use nTune please download the latest
    version from this link: http://www.nvidia.com/content/drivers/drivers.asp




    There is also a BIOS update (P27). P27 has the following fixes
    a.. Quad-Core OC Improvements
    b.. Additional support for 1333MHz CPU's
    Also includes these updates from bios P20, P21, P23, P24, P25, and P26:

    a.. Wireless PCI card fixes
    b.. Vreg fan header default set to on
    c.. Memory performance improvements
    d.. Vista WHQL Certified
    e.. USB Floppy improvements for RAID installs
    f.. Correct CPU temp and voltage system monitor displays in BIOS
    g.. Correct default CPU multiplier setting
    h.. Fix "Code 50" hang received under certain VGA configurations
    i.. Fix for SATA disk drives
    j.. Improvements to memory stability and overclockability
    k.. Disabled spread spectrum tables for improved overclockability
    l.. Improve POST screen CPU speed reporting
    m.. Improves X-Fi and internal audio functionality
    n.. WHQL Certified BIOS
    o.. Improvements to overclocking
    p.. Enhancements for Quad-Core CPUs
    q.. Adds ability to enable splash screen .
    Phil Weldon


    | **** Intel E4300 @ 3 GHz, 1333 MHz FSB, 1066 memory bus
    | (1.41 VDC CPU core, 1.80 VDC memory)
    |
    | The CPU and chipset fans were set to 100%.
    | Intel boxed-retail heatsink/fan w/ zinc oxide in ester base thermal
    grease.
    | No case fans were used.
    | The case side was open.
    |
    | nVidia Control Panel Stability Test
    | 'Verify the stability of the following' (settings)
    | CPU
    | Memory
    | PCI-E bus
    | GPU
    |
    |
    |
    | IDLE Temperatures:
    | Room ambient: 21 C
    | CPU: 32 C
    | System (chipset?): 36 C
    | GPU: 52 C
    | Stability Test temperatures, 6 hour run
    | Room ambient temperature: 21 C
    | CPU: 47 C
    | System (chipset?): 37 C
    | GPU: 61 C
    |
    | I did not intend the CPU core voltage to be above stock; in the BIOS I had
    | set it to [AUTO], but (as I noticed AFTER the 6 hour run) nVidia was
    | reporting the CPU core voltage as 1.41 VDC.
    |
    | Has nVidia made overclocking harder by trying to make it easier?
    | Well, back to the manuals B^(
    |
    | Phil Weldon
     
    Phil Weldon, Apr 16, 2007
    #65
  6. Phil Weldon

    Ed Medlin Guest

    That is for the E6600. The QX6700 and above Extreme quad is not coming down
    in price by very big margins as the Core 2 Duos are. Intel's price drops are
    focused on the mid and lower range processors and not a lot on the higher
    end. They are going to release some new versions of the Quad cores, but I
    don't have a clue as to when. They are supposed to fall into the price range
    of the E6xxx series' of processors as their prices come down. I am mainly
    interested in the larger cache and possible perfomance gain of overclocking
    the E6600. I know that the lower fsb of the E4xxx and lower would probably
    give a better % of overclockability, but I am looking more at getting more
    performance rather than just raw MHZ. I presently have an I630 3.0ghz
    running at 3.6 and it is ok, but the E6600 outperforms it even at stock
    speeds in every bench I have seen (and this sucker has always been a hot
    one..:).

    Ed
     
    Ed Medlin, Apr 16, 2007
    #66
  7. Phil Weldon

    Fishface Guest

    Well, from $8xx to $5xx, and since you did mention video editing!
    I read August. It'll be here before you know it.
    I think I read $3xx for a quad core in August.
    I was originally going to get an E6600 because of the cache, but in most
    of the benchmarks I saw, the extra cache didn't have a profound effect.
    So I got the E6400.
    Quick, sell it to your brother before he changes his mind!

    I memtest+d four sticks of that cheap memory at 445 x 7 2.2v all day and
    all was well when I got home. I just tried to bump it up to 450 and the
    system said the overclock failed. I did have vcore and the northbridge
    voltage at stock, though...
     
    Fishface, Apr 17, 2007
    #67
  8. Phil Weldon

    Jack R Guest

    ---reading avidly---
    I'm enjoying reading through this thread...good stuff!
    Have you tried SpeedFan? http://www.almico.com/speedfan.php
    I have version 4.32 running and it seems to be quite accurate, compared to a
    couple of other measurements.
    It has a very nice graphing feature that can track the dual cpu temps very
    quickly as load changes occur.
    I'll post more about my 6600/ASUS experience as I go.

    As long as I'm here, what CPU core voltages do you folks run? All I've
    found is that Intel specs the core voltage at 0.850 to 1.3525V. What is
    default, and what is a good starting place for OC'ing?
    Thanks,
    Jack R
     
    Jack R, Apr 17, 2007
    #68
  9. Phil Weldon

    Fishface Guest

    I memtest+d four sticks of that cheap memory at 445 x 7 2.2v
    I bumped up the Vmch (Northbridge) a notch and still no go at
    450. 449 is stable, though. I think there must be a strap change
    at 450 or something. I'll try bumping it up on the fly in Windows.
     
    Fishface, Apr 17, 2007
    #69
  10. Phil Weldon

    Ed Medlin Guest

    Glad you enjoy reading all this 'stuff'. Actually, this is about as active
    as this group has been in awhile. As far as core voltages go, the defaults
    are different with about every processor offering. We try and run as low a
    core voltage as possible and still achieve our goal. The starting place is
    whatever the processor default is from intel.com or the box. We get what we
    can at that voltage and then raise it a tad and do it again. After going
    through this process a few times we eventually find the processor's max
    overclockability. Heat is usually the first deciding factor. As a processor
    is overclocked, the temperature becomes more and more important. 60c at
    default speeds might be just fine. 60c at a 30% overclock might cause
    instability. I am waiting for my E6600/680i package now so maybe we can
    share some info. Hopefully I can get started before the weekend.



    Ed
     
    Ed Medlin, Apr 18, 2007
    #70
  11. Phil Weldon

    Jack R Guest

    Thanks Ed!
    I don't know what the default core voltage is for my E6600. The MB has a
    'default' setting (whatever that may be), and a wide range of voltage
    choices. I looked on the Intel site and found the 'spec': 0.850 to
    1.3525V...not helpful.
    My system, still in its infancy, is unstable/won't POST at default settings.
    Setting the memory voltage to 1.92V gets it past that, but still with some
    problems..such as occasionally hanging in the BIOS startup, sometimes
    failing to shut down (from Vista), and so forth.
    I've got a new "SLI compatible" PSU on order, and will fight harder when it
    arrives.
    I've run at over 3.0GHz for short periods, and it's very quick!
    Thanks again,
    Jack R
     
    Jack R, Apr 19, 2007
    #71
  12. Phil Weldon

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'Jack R' wrote:
    | I don't know what the default core voltage is for my E6600. The MB has a
    | 'default' setting (whatever that may be), and a wide range of voltage
    | choices. I looked on the Intel site and found the 'spec': 0.850 to
    | 1.3525V...not helpful.
    | My system, still in its infancy, is unstable/won't POST at default
    settings.
    | Setting the memory voltage to 1.92V gets it past that, but still with some
    | problems..such as occasionally hanging in the BIOS startup, sometimes
    | failing to shut down (from Vista), and so forth.
    | I've got a new "SLI compatible" PSU on order, and will fight harder when
    it
    | arrives.
    | I've run at over 3.0GHz for short periods, and it's very quick!
    _____

    I've found that the nTune stability test is fairly worthless. It only uses
    one CPU, and the CPU temperature running the nTune stability test is 15 C or
    more lower than the CPU temperature running Orthos Stress Prime suggested by
    'Fishface' (it loads both cores to 100%.)

    WinFan is no more useful than nMonitor. In my system neither reports all
    the fan speeds and temperatures that the BIOS does, and some of the voltages
    are suspect, well more than that, just plain wrong (where is MotherBoard
    Monitor now that we need it!)

    I have tried the idea of disabling core 1 to lower the heat production so
    that temperature will not be as much of a factor. So far the Intel stock
    heatsink/fan seems to limit a stable overclock with my E4300 to 3 GHz (both
    cores enabled) with a slight CPU core voltage boost (from 1.325 VDC to 1.375
    VDC). I have by no means tried all the possible parameter settings
    possible; I don't know what many of them actually mean. The manual is
    fairly worthless for an explanation of some of the clocks and the
    interrelationships.

    At the moment, my previously reported over clock of 2.7 GHz* would be my
    choice for stock air cooling for my particular system (I'm unlikely to see
    room temperatures as low as 23 C very often in the next six months.) I
    suppose I will try a few different thermal compounds before going to water
    cooling for the CPU. I have a Zalman 'flower' heatsink I may try before
    water if it is not too much trouble to install.

    But before changing the cooling I plan to locate the system thermal sensor
    on the motherboard, read the specifications of the Winbond chip used on the
    EVGA 680i SLI motherboard, and continue to look for other monitoring
    applets. And maybe actually play a game ('Dark Messiah' came with the EVGA
    motherboard and 'Supreme Commander came with the EVGA 8800 GTS.) And also
    phone EVGA about the problems I find with nMonitor and nTune (I've called
    EVGA tech support once on an earlier question and got an real technician
    after less than a 30 second wait.)

    * with the FrontSide Bus at 1200 MHz and the memory bus at 1200 MHz (300 MHz
    clock), 1.250 VDC core voltage, 2.3 VDC memory, temperature of air entering
    heatsink/fan 23 C, CPU temperature 57 C running both cores with Orthos
    stress prime

    Phil Weldon
    E4300 50% overclock @ 6% undervolt and still trying






    | Thanks Ed!
    | I don't know what the default core voltage is for my E6600. The MB has a
    | 'default' setting (whatever that may be), and a wide range of voltage
    | choices. I looked on the Intel site and found the 'spec': 0.850 to
    | 1.3525V...not helpful.
    | My system, still in its infancy, is unstable/won't POST at default
    settings.
    | Setting the memory voltage to 1.92V gets it past that, but still with some
    | problems..such as occasionally hanging in the BIOS startup, sometimes
    | failing to shut down (from Vista), and so forth.
    | I've got a new "SLI compatible" PSU on order, and will fight harder when
    it
    | arrives.
    | I've run at over 3.0GHz for short periods, and it's very quick!
    | Thanks again,
    | Jack R
    |
    | | >
    | > | >> ---reading avidly---
    | >> I'm enjoying reading through this thread...good stuff!
    | >> Have you tried SpeedFan? http://www.almico.com/speedfan.php
    | >> I have version 4.32 running and it seems to be quite accurate, compared
    | >> to a couple of other measurements.
    | >> It has a very nice graphing feature that can track the dual cpu temps
    | >> very quickly as load changes occur.
    | >> I'll post more about my 6600/ASUS experience as I go.
    | >>
    | >> As long as I'm here, what CPU core voltages do you folks run? All I've
    | >> found is that Intel specs the core voltage at 0.850 to 1.3525V. What is
    | >> default, and what is a good starting place for OC'ing?
    | >> Thanks,
    | >> Jack R
    | >>
    | > Glad you enjoy reading all this 'stuff'. Actually, this is about as
    active
    | > as this group has been in awhile. As far as core voltages go, the
    defaults
    | > are different with about every processor offering. We try and run as low
    a
    | > core voltage as possible and still achieve our goal. The starting place
    is
    | > whatever the processor default is from intel.com or the box. We get what
    | > we can at that voltage and then raise it a tad and do it again. After
    | > going through this process a few times we eventually find the
    processor's
    | > max overclockability. Heat is usually the first deciding factor. As a
    | > processor is overclocked, the temperature becomes more and more
    important.
    | > 60c at default speeds might be just fine. 60c at a 30% overclock might
    | > cause instability. I am waiting for my E6600/680i package now so maybe
    we
    | > can share some info. Hopefully I can get started before the weekend.
    | >
    | >
    | >
    | > Ed
    | >
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Apr 19, 2007
    #72
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