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E6600 and D975XBX2

Discussion in 'Overclocking' started by tom, Feb 27, 2007.

  1. tom

    tom Guest

    I have a D975XBX2 with a E6600 and Kingston HyperX 667Mhz RAM

    I can't ajust my multiplier. Does someone have the same problem or now
    how to solve?

    The other thing is, when I look with CPU-Z is my multiplier switching
    himself from 9x to 6x and back... He does this with standard settings
    and also with a little overclocking at the moment I run it with
    2880MHz, I will go a litte higher when I have the new RAMs OCZ
    Platinum 4-5-4-15 (4x1GB)

    Thanks Tom
     
    tom, Feb 27, 2007
    #1
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  2. tom

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'Tom' wrote, in part:
    | I have a D975XBX2 with a E6600 and Kingston HyperX 667Mhz RAM
    |
    | I can't ajust my multiplier. Does someone have the same problem or now
    | how to solve?
    _____

    The CPU multiplier can NOT be changed for Intel CPUs later than about the
    Pentium II 300. Overclocking can only be accomplished by increasing the
    FrontSide Bus frequency for these CPUs. The BIOS settings for CPU
    multiplier has NO effect. At all. Can not have any effect. The CPU
    multiplier is locked INSIDE the CPU. Only special experimental engineering
    Intel CPUs since the Pentium II 300 have unlocked CPU multipliers.

    If you have memory capable of the higher FSB, you should be able to get
    upwards of 3.2 GHz with the Core 2 Duo E6600. Higher speeds will be limited
    by memory performance.

    The Intel Core 2 Duo E4000 series CPUs have greater overclocking potential
    because the standard FSB is lower (800 MHz vs. 1066 MHz) and is so not
    limited as much by memory performance. For overall USEFUL performance, an
    overclocked Core 2 Duo E6600 is probably better because of a higher FSB and
    larger L2 Cache.

    Phil Weldon

    |I have a D975XBX2 with a E6600 and Kingston HyperX 667Mhz RAM
    |
    | I can't ajust my multiplier. Does someone have the same problem or now
    | how to solve?
    |
    | The other thing is, when I look with CPU-Z is my multiplier switching
    | himself from 9x to 6x and back... He does this with standard settings
    | and also with a little overclocking at the moment I run it with
    | 2880MHz, I will go a litte higher when I have the new RAMs OCZ
    | Platinum 4-5-4-15 (4x1GB)
    |
    | Thanks Tom
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Feb 28, 2007
    #2
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  3. tom

    tom Guest

    And does somebody nows something about this one?

    The other thing is, when I look with CPU-Z is my multiplier switching
    himself from 9x to 6x and back...
     
    tom, Mar 1, 2007
    #3
  4. tom

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'Tom' wrote:
    | And does somebody nows something about this one?
    |
    | The other thing is, when I look with CPU-Z is my multiplier switching
    | himself from 9x to 6x and back...
    _____

    My answer applies to the Intel E6600. What you see with CPU-Z is 'thermal
    throttling'. The CPU, in a completely on-CPU-chip action that REDUCES the
    CPU multiplier to lower heat production if the CPU temperature becomes too
    high. You can disable 'thermal throttle' (automatic CPU multiplier
    reduction [based on CPU temperature], but you can NOT directly change the
    CPU multiplier. You can NOT INCREASE the CPU multiplier.

    Phil Weldon

    | And does somebody nows something about this one?
    |
    | The other thing is, when I look with CPU-Z is my multiplier switching
    | himself from 9x to 6x and back...
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Mar 2, 2007
    #4
  5. tom

    Paul Guest

    It could be EIST.

    http://www.intel.com/cd/channel/res...op/proc_dsk_p4/technical_reference/203838.htm

    I haven't been able to find any info on how EIST works on current
    processors. On the older stuff, there were two multiplier values.
    AMD has multiple P-states for their processors, but I don't know
    if Intel does now as well or not. I cannot find any details on
    the Intel site, for how many P-states they use. But that might be
    why the multipler value is changing. Disabling EIST in the BIOS
    might be the first step I'd try, to make it stop.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Mar 2, 2007
    #5
  6. tom

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'Paul' wrote, in part:
    | It could be EIST.
    |
    |
    http://www.intel.com/cd/channel/res...op/proc_dsk_p4/technical_reference/203838.htm
    |
    | I haven't been able to find any info on how EIST works on current
    | processors.
    _____

    The behavior seen by the original poster IS Enhanced Intel Speedstep
    Technology at work.

    Additional information is at
    http://www.intel.com/support/processors/core2duo/
    and
    http://www.intel.com/design/processor/datashts/313278.htm
    (particularly 6.3)
    and
    http://www.intel.com/design/processor/specupdt/313279.htm
    and
    http://www.intel.com/cd/channel/reseller/asmo-na/eng/203838.htm .

    Phil Weldon





    | Phil Weldon wrote:
    | > 'Tom' wrote:
    | > | And does somebody nows something about this one?
    | > |
    | > | The other thing is, when I look with CPU-Z is my multiplier switching
    | > | himself from 9x to 6x and back...
    | > _____
    | >
    | > My answer applies to the Intel E6600. What you see with CPU-Z is
    'thermal
    | > throttling'. The CPU, in a completely on-CPU-chip action that REDUCES
    the
    | > CPU multiplier to lower heat production if the CPU temperature becomes
    too
    | > high. You can disable 'thermal throttle' (automatic CPU multiplier
    | > reduction [based on CPU temperature], but you can NOT directly change
    the
    | > CPU multiplier. You can NOT INCREASE the CPU multiplier.
    | >
    | > Phil Weldon
    |
    | It could be EIST.
    |
    |
    http://www.intel.com/cd/channel/res...op/proc_dsk_p4/technical_reference/203838.htm
    |
    | I haven't been able to find any info on how EIST works on current
    | processors. On the older stuff, there were two multiplier values.
    | AMD has multiple P-states for their processors, but I don't know
    | if Intel does now as well or not. I cannot find any details on
    | the Intel site, for how many P-states they use. But that might be
    | why the multipler value is changing. Disabling EIST in the BIOS
    | might be the first step I'd try, to make it stop.
    |
    | Paul
    |
    | >
    | > | > | And does somebody nows something about this one?
    | > |
    | > | The other thing is, when I look with CPU-Z is my multiplier switching
    | > | himself from 9x to 6x and back...
    | > |
    | >
    | >
     
    Phil Weldon, Mar 2, 2007
    #6
  7. tom

    Paul Guest

    What I'm referring to, is when they say:

    "Multiple voltage/frequency operating points"

    they don't say how many points. EIST on older processors was
    noteworthy, because it used precisely two points. I'm curious
    if Intel has invested all the extra effort in VRD11 and
    D-VID, only to still have the same two operating states.
    AMD was different, because they test their processors at
    more than two P-states, but Intel provides no such
    explicit information about their products. Makes me
    wonder how the BIOS knows precisely what ACPI objects
    to pass to the OS (i.e. where is the knowledge about
    the number of FID/VID combinations stored). At least
    with AMD, you could look up what states were supported.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Mar 2, 2007
    #7
  8. tom

    tom Guest

    I did disable EIST, but it is still switching between 6 and 9, any
    other idees?
     
    tom, Mar 2, 2007
    #8
  9. tom

    Phil Weldon Guest

    WHERE did you disable EIST? There is a BIOS setting and a Windows XP
    setting. See the reference from my previous post
    http://www.intel.com/cd/channel/reseller/asmo-na/eng/203838.htm ,

    under 'Integration'
    for the BIOS:
    1.. Ensure Enhanced Intel SpeedStep technology is enabled in your BIOS.
    For Intel desktop boards the Intel SpeedStep technology option is under the,
    "Power," tab and labeled, "EIST." Ensure it is set to, "Enabled."
    for Windows XP:

    Under Control Panel - open Power Options
    a.. Under the Power Schemes pull down menu
    a.. To turn Enhanced Intel SpeedStep technology ON select, "Minimal
    Power Management," power scheme.
    b.. To turn Enhanced Intel SpeedStep technology OFF select, "Always On,"
    power scheme.
    More than that I cannot say, but only recommend you contact Intel customer
    support.

    Phil Weldon

    |I did disable EIST, but it is still switching between 6 and 9, any
    | other idees?
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Mar 3, 2007
    #9
  10. tom

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'Paul' wrote, in part:
    | they don't say how many points. EIST on older processors was
    | noteworthy, because it used precisely two points. I'm curious
    | if Intel has invested all the extra effort in VRD11 and
    | D-VID, only to still have the same two operating states.
    | AMD was different, because they test their processors at
    | more than two P-states,
    _____

    Intel historically has produced more robust CPUs than AMD. Intel EIST is
    implemented on-CPU-die for thermal control, one step-down seems sufficient,
    and clearly is the explanation for the original poster. What purpose would
    additional CPU multiplier and CPU core voltage setbacks serve? Other than
    to offer operation using variously inadequate thermal solutions?

    Phil Weldon

    | Phil Weldon wrote:
    | > 'Paul' wrote, in part:
    | > | It could be EIST.
    | > |
    | > |
    | >
    http://www.intel.com/cd/channel/res...op/proc_dsk_p4/technical_reference/203838.htm
    | > |
    | > | I haven't been able to find any info on how EIST works on current
    | > | processors.
    | > _____
    | >
    | > The behavior seen by the original poster IS Enhanced Intel Speedstep
    | > Technology at work.
    | >
    | > Additional information is at
    | > http://www.intel.com/support/processors/core2duo/
    | > and
    | > http://www.intel.com/design/processor/datashts/313278.htm
    | > (particularly 6.3)
    | > and
    | > http://www.intel.com/design/processor/specupdt/313279.htm
    | > and
    | > http://www.intel.com/cd/channel/reseller/asmo-na/eng/203838.htm .
    | >
    | > Phil Weldon
    | >
    |
    | What I'm referring to, is when they say:
    |
    | "Multiple voltage/frequency operating points"
    |
    | they don't say how many points. EIST on older processors was
    | noteworthy, because it used precisely two points. I'm curious
    | if Intel has invested all the extra effort in VRD11 and
    | D-VID, only to still have the same two operating states.
    | AMD was different, because they test their processors at
    | more than two P-states, but Intel provides no such
    | explicit information about their products. Makes me
    | wonder how the BIOS knows precisely what ACPI objects
    | to pass to the OS (i.e. where is the knowledge about
    | the number of FID/VID combinations stored). At least
    | with AMD, you could look up what states were supported.
    |
    | Paul
     
    Phil Weldon, Mar 3, 2007
    #10
  11. tom

    Paul Guest

    EIST is for power savings, not for thermal reasons. If the processor
    is not being used, it drops to a low power state. And has the ability
    to return to the higher power state, in very little time.

    Thermal Monitor is for thermal control, and involves clock throttling.

    "When the Thermal Monitor feature is enabled and a high temperature
    situation exists (i.e. TCC is active), the clocks are modulated by
    alternately turning the clocks off and on at a duty cycle specific
    to the processor (typically 30-50%)."

    With regard to EIST, AMD does the same thing, only AMD is load sensitive
    with more power states. I'm not saying that is particularly beneficial, but
    it does allow AMD to run the CPU closer to 100% relative load, by choosing
    one of the intermediate P-states. I guess I've seen very little investigation
    into whether those features actually work or not, and Intel not giving
    details just makes matters worse.

    Both companies have their faults when it comes to documentation. I've
    noticed, since AM2 came along, that AMD has become very lazy, when it
    comes to documenting their products. The kind of info they offered for
    S754 and S939, is missing for AM2. In fact, I don't think I can find
    P-state info for AM2, just for earlier processors. There isn't even a
    generic AM2 socket spec. It is almost like they fired the tech
    documentation department. The only doc I did find that was useful,
    was the BIOS writers guide for AM2 (32559.pdf).

    Paul
     
    Paul, Mar 3, 2007
    #11
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