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E6600 Core 2 Duo on Intel D975XBX2 motherboard

Discussion in 'Overclocking' started by mcsconsult, Dec 2, 2006.

  1. mcsconsult

    mcsconsult Guest

    Novice Overclocker needs help! I put together a new system using an
    Intel D975XBX2 motherboard and a E6600 Core 2 Duo CPU, along with 4GB
    of DDR2 667 memory. Its fast, but I keep reading about how simple it
    is to overclock this CPU. I've read the overclocking guides but still
    am a bit queasy about jumping in and possibly burning out my cpu. If
    anyone familiar with this board and can explain precisely how to
    overclock it, by a modest margin, I'd be really grateful. For example,
    under the performance menu in the bios, the voltage settings can be
    adjusted for the cpu, fsb, and mch. Does changing one require changing
    all of them? Does each setting need to be adjusted in order to
    increase the processor speed?
     
    mcsconsult, Dec 2, 2006
    #1
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  2. mcsconsult

    ElJerid Guest

    If you're novice in overclocking, don' t do it. You will avoid potential
    problems and anyways, your system is more powerfull than most applications
    require. In practice, you will not notice any difference (except in
    benchmarks). Note also that Intel boards are not the champions in OC.
     
    ElJerid, Dec 3, 2006
    #2
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  3. mcsconsult

    mcsconsult Guest

    A year ago I wouldn't have attempted to overclock my Pentium D. But
    the release of the Core 2 Duo and the D975XBX2 have changed my
    attitude. First, the new Bios, with its Performance menu and
    simplified choices, has in some ways validated and lessened the risks
    of Overclocking. Second, the prospect of increasing the performance of
    the E6600 by 20% or 30% is hard to resist. Are you sure that a 30% or
    so gain in processor power would not be noticeable in everyday
    multi-tasking? Maybe that's true, but its hard to believe. The point
    about potential system instability is well taken, but it seems also,
    that it can be averted by making careful, small incremental changes.
     
    mcsconsult, Dec 3, 2006
    #3
  4. mcsconsult

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'mcsconsult' wrote:
    | A year ago I wouldn't have attempted to overclock my Pentium D. But
    | the release of the Core 2 Duo and the D975XBX2 have changed my
    | attitude. First, the new Bios, with its Performance menu and
    | simplified choices, has in some ways validated and lessened the risks
    | of Overclocking. Second, the prospect of increasing the performance of
    | the E6600 by 20% or 30% is hard to resist. Are you sure that a 30% or
    | so gain in processor power would not be noticeable in everyday
    | multi-tasking? Maybe that's true, but its hard to believe. The point
    | about potential system instability is well taken, but it seems also,
    | that it can be averted by making careful, small incremental changes.
    _____

    You are correct on all points. ALL overclockers were novices once! When
    you begin, post specific questions here.

    Phil Weldon

    |A year ago I wouldn't have attempted to overclock my Pentium D. But
    | the release of the Core 2 Duo and the D975XBX2 have changed my
    | attitude. First, the new Bios, with its Performance menu and
    | simplified choices, has in some ways validated and lessened the risks
    | of Overclocking. Second, the prospect of increasing the performance of
    | the E6600 by 20% or 30% is hard to resist. Are you sure that a 30% or
    | so gain in processor power would not be noticeable in everyday
    | multi-tasking? Maybe that's true, but its hard to believe. The point
    | about potential system instability is well taken, but it seems also,
    | that it can be averted by making careful, small incremental changes.
    |
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Dec 4, 2006
    #4
  5. mcsconsult

    Ed Medlin Guest

    Phil is absolutely correct. Yes you will notice a 20-30% gain. With
    overclocking the two main things to consider is heat and stability. I got my
    Pentium D I630 (3ghz) up to I660 speeds (3.6ghz) almost 2yrs ago and it is
    very stable and hot, but not any hotter than stock temps. I have not had a
    single issue related to the overclock. I may even be a couple of degrees C
    cooler because I added a slightly larger and quieter HS/Fan that cost me
    only $12.00 US at my local 'puter shop. I am not sure about your Intel MB,
    but since they have come out with a couple of boards that have bios' that
    now have overclocking options I would have to know what those options are.
    Phil was around this group when we were overclocking P-Pros and onward, and
    has a very good database of tips. It is very hard to actually destroy modern
    CPUs. They become unstable long before any damage can be done. Just don't
    increase voltages in large increments. My Pentium D is at stock voltage. I
    am looking at a C2D for a build early next year, probably Jan. if Mama
    allows.....:). Stay in touch with us and ask if you have any questions.
    That is basically how we all began. I am interested in how well you do and
    what issues may come up. We all are still learning. Like Phil said, we were
    all novices once. I will add that I am always trying to learn something new
    too......

    Ed
     
    Ed Medlin, Dec 4, 2006
    #5
  6. mcsconsult

    mcsconsult Guest

    Thanks! I will definately post back when I try it, prob. later this
    afternoon. You asked about the specific choices; I can raise the FSB
    frequency from 266 to over 300. I can raise the Voltage in increments,
    starting at 1.25V all the way to 1.6, for the CPU, MCH, FSB. The
    memory timings can be changed too-not sure I want to....
     
    mcsconsult, Dec 4, 2006
    #6
  7. mcsconsult

    Ed Medlin Guest

    WOW. A true, full fledged overclocking bios on an Intel board. Don't mess
    with the voltage right away. See how far you can go at stock voltages with
    the FSB in very small increments. If Windows doesn't boot or you get errors,
    then you might want to try one increment (whatever the bios allows) raise of
    the core voltage. As far as your memory goes, that will probably just stay
    at default timings, but may also be a limiting factor on how far you can go.
    My DDR2 PC4200 goes up to 320 from 266 which gets my I630 up to 3.6ghz. That
    is a 20% gain on a not-so-great overclocking processor. As hot as these
    things run stock I wouldn't want to mess with raising the core voltage. So
    keep us posted and I wish you luck.

    Ed
     
    Ed Medlin, Dec 5, 2006
    #7
  8. mcsconsult

    mcsconsult Guest

    Yeah, the BIOS for the intel D975XBX2 is REVOLUTIONARY for Intel. An
    entire Performance menu dedicated to tweaking settings. The advice to
    leave the voltage alone I've heard a lot.

    Is it because it carries the most risk of burning out the board or cpu?
    My only concern with raising just the system bus frequency was that it
    somehow would be at the detriment of other area's? Not really sure.
    But will post results.
     
    mcsconsult, Dec 6, 2006
    #8
  9. mcsconsult

    mcsconsult Guest

    Took the advice and left alone the voltages and raised the CPU to
    2.7GHZ. I ran the Intel Thermal tool, and its reporting a 48 celcius
    temp with a frequency of 2700MHZ, with over a dozen applications open,
    including Word, Illustrator, Publisher, etc. Computer running fine,
    nothing has gotten stuck. Not sure I can tell that there is a huge
    increase, but then again, I only raised to 2.7GHZ.

    Then, with the same app's open, I used the Workload level monitor in
    the Thermal Analysis tool at the 100% setting. The temp quickly rose
    to 58, 59, hovered for a bit around 60, and I stopped it when it
    climbed to 64 celcius, after about one minute.

    Any thoughts?
     
    mcsconsult, Dec 6, 2006
    #9
  10. mcsconsult

    Fishface Guest

    Intel says the maximum voltage is 1.35v. Intel CPUs are protected
    from overheating by throttling, which means they slow themselves
    down. Plus, the four pin CPU fans speed-up as the temperature
    increases. For 2.7 GHz, I think your temperature seems a bit high,
    though. Apparently the IHSs (heat spreaders) vary somewhat in
    how flat they are and how well they transfer heat from the actual
    chip. As well, the various monitors of temperature seem to vary.

    Most review sites agree that around 3.2 GHz is what you can
    expect from stock cooling, CPU and other hardware willing.
    However, your ability to raise the FSB only to 300 concerns me
    and may well affect your results. With your nine multiplier, you
    could well be tapped-out. But you might be able to adjust it
    further using Clockgen or one of the other tweaking utilities!
     
    Fishface, Dec 6, 2006
    #10
  11. mcsconsult

    oscar Guest

    Haven't got any advice to give, but I'm thinking of getting the same combo
    Intel 975XBX board and C2D 6600 CPU so I watch this thread with interest -
    just curious, what video card do you use and are you running any heavy duty
    games on it?
     
    oscar, Dec 6, 2006
    #11
  12. mcsconsult

    mcsconsult Guest

    Im not much of a gamer Oscar. But I do have a decent video Card-ATI's
    X1950 Pro 256MB. If you are thinking of the combo, I'd recm'd it based
     
    mcsconsult, Dec 6, 2006
    #12
  13. mcsconsult

    Ed Medlin Guest

    Tough to say. Does the Workload level monitor push the cpu usage to 100% ?
    If it does, those temps are what we call max load temps. I would like to see
    those down a few degrees, maybe 55-60C maximum. What are your idle temps (no
    programs open at all)? If those are from the bios, it could be a bit
    misleading because while in bios your OS's hlt command is not operating and
    the temps may read somewhat higher. I use MBM (MotherBoardMonitor) in XP for
    my temp readings. I would suspect that your MB is already supported since
    they are fairly fast about adding support for newer MBs as they come out. It
    is a free program and is very useful. http://mbm.livewiredev.com/ is the
    place to get it. Just to put you at ease, you are nowhere near hurting your
    MB or CPU. Throttling back doesn't even start until over 70C and the CPU
    will just shut down if it goes beyond the throttling stage. I once had a P4
    HS bracket break and the HS/Fan unit just fell into the bottom of the case
    and the CPU just shut down and had no damage at all. Intel has made them
    fairly bulletproof. Do you hear the CPU fan spinning up to higher rpms as
    the temp rises? If you don't, you might look in the bios somewhere in the
    Power area for settings to raise the fan speed as the temps go up. It may
    need to be enabled. Other than that, it seems you are on your way. Make sure
    you have good front to back airflow and you may need to try thermal paste
    instead of the pad on the Intel HS. You are not far off. You should be able
    to get it to 3-3.2ghz from all I have read with just stock cooling. Of
    course, all HS' are not identically milled and some are a bit lacking in
    overall contact with the CPU. Make sure all your wires and cables are
    tie-wrapped out of the way for good airflow and add a front and rear fan if
    you don't already have them. Keep us posted.....


    Ed
     
    Ed Medlin, Dec 6, 2006
    #13
  14. mcsconsult

    Fishface Guest

    My E6400 didn't come with a pad, just a funky masked-stripe
    application of thermal compound. The base of the stock cooler
    is round like the orb coolers and doesn't contact the square IHS
    at the corners. I just slapped mine on for testing, knowing I would
    be taking it off. On the Biostar 965PT box top at 21° C ambient,
    the cpu temp stabilized at 64° C running Orthos at 413 x 8 = 3.3
    GHz with 1.35v Vcore. That's as high as I tested and the board
    does not allow for multiplier adjustments. I only have this Crucial
    Tenth Anniversary DDR2 667 that I bought on sale at Newegg:
    www.crucial.com/store/partspecs.Asp?IMODULE=TY2KIT12864AA663

    While testing with Memtest86+, it happily ran 450 FSB at 4-4-4-12
    without errors at 1.27v Vcore, but I had to raise the Vcore for
    stability in Orthos just to run 3.2 GHz. Vdimm only goes up to 2.2,
    which is specified for the memory, but there is an easy mod I may
    try that doesn't require any soldering to the board:
    www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=110106&page=2

    The board layout is a little wonky. It's a narrow board so the last
    row of standoffs are missing and you have to be careful. I have two
    plastic standoffs at the corners, but there's no support in the middle
    on the right side. Fortunately, my memory was already installed when
    I mounted the board in the case, but I could feel the board flexing
    when I plugged-in the SATA cables. There is a header for a
    parallel port, but nothing to plug into it, and headers for s/pdif in and
    out, but again, nothing to plug. I added a cheap $15 PCI firewire
    card which still leaves two empty PCI slots in addition to a PCI-E
    x4 and x1 slots. The single x16 PCI-E slot may not be the finest
    example as I had to wrestle with the video card a bit.
    http://images10.newegg.com/NeweggImage/productimage/13-138-037-03.JPG

    My hard drive is coming today. The WD1500ADFD should perform
    a little better than the 20GB Seagate from yesteryear used to test.
    Video is a passively cooled Gigabyte 7600GS for now. This thing
    gets seriously hot while doing nothing. The Antec P180 case has a
    VGA cooling duct for which I ordered a skinny 80mm x 15mm fan
    as that is all that will fit. I'm hoping to run the fan on 7v. I don't game
    much, but the 7600GS is at least faster than my old unlocked 6800LE
    AGP. Power is supplied by an Antec NeoHe 500w. This box is
    amazingly quiet without a hard drive installed. I probably picked
    the wrong drive for quiet, but I'm accustomed to seek noise with my
    SCSI drives. It gives me some feedback that something is happening
    if nothing appears on the screen right away and the cursor does not
    change to an hourglass. A pair of 500 GB drives will accompany the
    Raptor in the lower compartment. I will probably need to turn-up the
    fan to keep them all cool.

    I seem to have digressed into a mini-review of the Biostar 965PT
    and description of my new system. But this place has been so dead
    lately, the good people need something to read!
     
    Fishface, Dec 6, 2006
    #14
  15. mcsconsult

    Ed Medlin Guest

    Intel has been improving their HS/Fans performance lately. As long as your
    temps do not rise above where they are now, you should be ok but I would
    like to see that temp down maybe by 5C or so. 64C at stock speeds is
    different than 64C when OC'd. The main issue is stability. As long as you
    stay stable you should be fine.
    I looked at that. Never saw anything like it before.....:). As for me, I
    like to keep things simple and not add another device to worry about. 3.2 is
    pretty good. Did your temps stay the same after you raised the Vcore? I
    would suspect they didn't rise much if at all with a very minor increase.
    I clipped the top (part that goes through the board) of some plastic
    standoffs to give the center of my present board a bit less flex. At least
    they won't short anything and do help. I use an old PC60 Lian Li case and
    like it's airflow characteristics but some newer MBs have mounting layouts
    that don't line up with it's MB tray. I always say if it works, do
    it.......:)
    Try the fan at standard 12v first and see if it is loud. I have five 80mm
    fans on a speed controller with three settings, fast, medium and slow. I
    think the slow setting is 7v, but the airflow is not great. I use medium
    which is probably normal voltage and all I hear is air moving. I can't hear
    the actual fans at all. On the high setting they run a lot faster than if I
    connected them to 12v, so I don't have a clue as to the voltage there. My
    case sounds like a Huey on that setting.....:). This controller was built
    into the case and uses one 12v rail. You might want to mount a fan to blow
    over that video card's HS fins. I am not a big believer in fanless video
    cards as hot as some of the GPUs get today.
    At least we can get a bit long-winded without someone
    complaining.........:) I wonder where Phil W. and Richard H. have been?
    They are long time contributors to this group and should jump right
    in..........

    Ed
     
    Ed Medlin, Dec 7, 2006
    #15
  16. mcsconsult

    Fishface Guest

    Well, that was out of the case. I'm a little worried. I'm looking at a
    Thermalright SI-128, but this picture scares me:
    http://img118.imageshack.us/my.php?image=thermalrightsi128015nw9.jpg
    Look at how the motherboard is bending! I think this kit for other
    models will work with it, or that I can make it work:
    http://www.thermalright.com/a_page/images/acc_lga775.jpg

    Well, I didn't actually check it before! I wonder if this is the same
    heatsink used by the Pentium D series. Intel only specifies the
    Thermal Design Power at 80% CPU utilization, but this heatsink
    seems to be able to handle 100% at even the E6800 speed.
    What holds them in place?
    And yet you'd think it should be able to show you the Windows
    desktop without getting so hot. My five year old Matrox card
    has no fan and does not get so hot!
    Deep in the sheep? I heard that in an Xmas song today. Naturally,
    I assumed the worst!
     
    Fishface, Dec 8, 2006
    #16
  17. mcsconsult

    Fishface Guest

    Deep in the sheep? I heard that in an Xmas song today. Naturally,
    Oh, um, I went searching. I guess it was "keeping their sheep--"
    but I know what I heard!
     
    Fishface, Dec 8, 2006
    #17
  18. mcsconsult

    mcsconsult Guest

    Pushed either too hard, or incorrectly. Suspect its the latter. After
    adjusting only the clock to 2.7GHZ, it ran great. Then I tried again,
    this time, set it to 3.15GHZ, but also adjusted each of the Voltage
    settings, by ONE increment each. Computer wouldn't restart.

    I cleared the CMOS and all is fine. But probably wont mess with it
    again until I figure out precisely WHICH voltage settings have to be
    adjusted and by HOW MUCH.

    Maybe I should have tried to adjust only the cpu speed to above 3GHZ
    without touching anything else, and it might have worked. I assumed,
    incorrectly, that doing so would require upping the voltage too....
     
    mcsconsult, Dec 8, 2006
    #18
  19. mcsconsult

    Ed Medlin Guest

    Well, that was out of the case. I'm a little worried. I'm looking at a
    You should get everything installed in the case and running at stock speeds
    first. If I open the side of my case my temps actually go up. Something to
    do with the open side disturbing the airflow I guess.
    That is good. The D series HSs were pretty beefy for Intel. I replaced the
    stock cooler with a slightly larger HS from Spire (bought locally) and it
    brought my temps down to an acceptable level.
    My MB tray had some extra holes near the center that didn't line up with any
    MB holes so I just clipped them and stuck them in the tray holes and they
    just touch the MB but cause no problems. They just give the board a bit less
    flex in the middle where I was a bit concerned.
    Yea, the older GPUs didn't get so hot. I would try and rig up a fan just to
    blow over the fins and cool it some. Tie wraps work if you have trouble
    finding a mounting spot........:)
    LOL.......good one.



    Ed
     
    Ed Medlin, Dec 8, 2006
    #19
  20. mcsconsult

    Ed Medlin Guest

    Pushed either too hard, or incorrectly. Suspect its the latter. After
    adjusting only the clock to 2.7GHZ, it ran great. Then I tried again,
    this time, set it to 3.15GHZ, but also adjusted each of the Voltage
    settings, by ONE increment each. Computer wouldn't restart.

    I cleared the CMOS and all is fine. But probably wont mess with it
    again until I figure out precisely WHICH voltage settings have to be
    adjusted and by HOW MUCH.

    Maybe I should have tried to adjust only the cpu speed to above 3GHZ
    without touching anything else, and it might have worked. I assumed,
    incorrectly, that doing so would require upping the voltage too....


    The only voltage you may need to raise is the Vcore, but just a tad. Reset
    your bios to default values and start again. Get everything into the case
    and running well first. I am not familiar with all the bios settings for
    that particular MB, but if you have settings that will automatically set the
    CPU speed use them first. Don't raise the Vcore yet. If you have it at
    2.7ghz just raise CPU freq by miniscule amounts after that. I suspect that
    you may have went too far too fast that time. If you do raise the mem
    voltage, just one notch would be all I would go. I haven't seen that help a
    lot in my experience. In almost every case I have seen the memory either
    will make it or it won't. Don't feel bad about the bios reset.......we have
    all done that. Remember, see how far you can go without raising any voltages
    first. You might go further than you think. Your memory voltage being too
    high can cause the problem you had. Usually the CPU will just give you an
    error message like "Overclocking Failed" or something to that effect and
    kick you back into the bios. That is what my present Asus board does with no
    CMOS clearing needed. Like I said, get everything installed like you want to
    first. Tie wrap all your cables and connectors neatly so you have good
    airflow and close the case. IOW, build it like you want it, then play with
    the overclocking.....:)

    Ed
     
    Ed Medlin, Dec 8, 2006
    #20
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