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eee pc? no eee box!

Discussion in 'Embedded' started by Don McKenzie, Aug 18, 2008.

  1. Don McKenzie

    Don McKenzie Guest

    Is this where PC boxes are heading?
    $400USD for a PC that runs on 20W of power, and can bolt to the back of
    an LCD monitor.

    It's the Asus EEE revolution doing it's thing again.

    http://event.asus.com/eeepc/microsites/eeebox/en/index.html
    http://forum.eeeuser.com/viewforum.php?id=51

    what's more, they are sticking with XP as an operating system.

    Cheers Don...



    --
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    Don McKenzie, Aug 18, 2008
    #1
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  2. Don McKenzie

    Stephen Pelc Guest

    200 USD 1 off, 6w, VESA mount; DOS, WinCE, WinXP or Linux, Ethernet,
    3xUSB, 2xRS232, 24 x GPIO ...
    http://www.mpeforth.com/ebox.htm
    and many other places.

    Stephen


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    tel: +44 (0)23 8063 1441, fax: +44 (0)23 8033 9691
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    Stephen Pelc, Aug 18, 2008
    #2
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  3. Don McKenzie

    Stephen Pelc Guest

    Mass storage is usually a Compact Flash card in the front slot.
    It's a good tight fit.

    Internal expansion is through a miniPCI connector, which is
    also used for a WiFi card if needed.

    Stephen


    --
    Stephen Pelc,
    MicroProcessor Engineering Ltd - More Real, Less Time
    133 Hill Lane, Southampton SO15 5AF, England
    tel: +44 (0)23 8063 1441, fax: +44 (0)23 8033 9691
    web: http://www.mpeforth.com - free VFX Forth downloads
     
    Stephen Pelc, Aug 18, 2008
    #3
  4. Don McKenzie

    Jack Guest

    Jack, Aug 18, 2008
    #4
  5. Don McKenzie

    TehPron Guest

    Yes, I suppose if you had an embedded application Compact Flash could
    be a useful mass storage format. But for the general commerical
    market, there is no reason to use anything other than SD cards or USB
    sticks. These formats may be limited to around 16 GB or so at the
    moment, but that is all I had on my PC some 5 years ago and a I would
    be very happy starting with that on such a portable unit today.

    Compact Flash or any of the other memory formats are for niche
    applcations today and most will be gone in another two years. I think
    people will still be using floppy disks longer than most of these
    memory stick formats. (I still have an excellent camera that uses
    floppies).
    I also saw mention of IDE 44. Is there room for an internal rotating
    disk drive like they use in the iPods?

    Rick
     
    TehPron, Aug 18, 2008
    #5
  6. Don McKenzie

    Stephen Pelc Guest

    It's here, available, ex-stock and cheap. It is what it is. I'm not
    advocating it for anything other than embedded or industrial use. At
    least CompactFlash has a mechnical standard, so you know what you are
    dealing with. As far as I know, USB sticks have no mechanical standard
    beyond the USB connector.
    Yes.

    Stephen


    --
    Stephen Pelc,
    MicroProcessor Engineering Ltd - More Real, Less Time
    133 Hill Lane, Southampton SO15 5AF, England
    tel: +44 (0)23 8063 1441, fax: +44 (0)23 8033 9691
    web: http://www.mpeforth.com - free VFX Forth downloads
     
    Stephen Pelc, Aug 18, 2008
    #6
  7. Don McKenzie

    Boo Guest

    It's here, available, ex-stock and cheap. It is what it is. I'm not
    It also has the advantage that IDE / SATA to CF adaptors are available at very
    reasonable prices (I bought 2 for a fiver off of eBay) and mean that they can be
    mounted internally to most PC cases.
     
    Boo, Aug 18, 2008
    #7
  8. Don McKenzie

    rickman Guest

    And it has the big disadvantage that you can't plug it into most
    desktops or laptops without a special adapter. Unless you need a
    capacity that currently (this week anyway) exceeds what is available
    in SD format, I don't see any reason to go with such a large and
    clumsy format. I guess there are applications where you want users to
    be able to remove the storage and the SD or USB format is so small
    that they are likely to loose it. But then a CF sized box should do
    the trick for an SD card or USB stick, or a dozen.

    Needing to have a mechanical spec for a USB stick seems to be an odd
    requirement. If there is not a spec out there, define your own spec
    for your mounting and specify a few units that meet that spec. This
    isn't rocket science.. at least I don't think it is. Are these things
    going on the shuttle?

    Rick
     
    rickman, Aug 18, 2008
    #8
  9. Don McKenzie

    Didi Guest

    Indeed not very likely but recently I was nicely surprised stumbling
    into 44-pin ATA (IDE) flash drives, starting at 1G around $20-25.
    Pretty good for a particular application I have - 1G won't get you
    very far in the wintel world nowadays, of course.

    http://www.transcendusa.com/Products/ModDetail.asp?ModNo=27&LangNo=0

    Didi
     
    Didi, Aug 18, 2008
    #9
  10. IDE44 drive like the 2.5 inch drives in a hell of a lot of laptops.
    Still lots of new ones about.

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    Paul Carpenter, Aug 18, 2008
    #10
  11. Don McKenzie

    rickman Guest

    That's nice, but $20 a GB is a bit rich these days. I expect you are
    paying for the novelty. I just think it is better to go mainstream as
    much as possible. So SD cards and USB memory is at the top of the
    list for my apps. The next time I design a processor board with
    Flash, it is likely to be a micro-SD socket. I get the absolute best
    bang for the buck that way and I never have to worry about
    availability or the parts being obsoleted!

    Rick
     
    rickman, Aug 18, 2008
    #11
  12. Don McKenzie

    Didi Guest

    I know SD cards are cheaper and widespread, I also was designing a
    slot
    for them in a project which got stalled (hopefully it will resume
    later
    this year, thumbs pressed :).
    But the advantage I take of these particular drives is the fact that
    I can use one of them at $20 for 1G or say a 120G or 160G "normal"
    2.5"
    drive at $80 still using the same connector... that's just device
    specific
    for me, I had planned the device without even knowing I would ever
    have the
    smaller/cheaper flash only option.

    Didi
     
    Didi, Aug 18, 2008
    #12
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