'fail safe' after bios flash - Abit AB9 PRO

Discussion in 'Abit' started by Michael Ingeman-Nielsen, Dec 10, 2006.

  1. Hi

    I have recently tried to flash my Abit AB9 PRO mobo with the latest
    bios version (15), mainly to get the following improvements (from the
    bios download page):

    7. Audio now works as intended after resuming from S3.
    8. The function "wake on LAN" now works as intemded.

    Now I get the CMOS CHECKSUM ERROR message that many before me have
    encountered. I have followed all the advice I have found that did not
    involve changing the hardware.

    The process was the following:
    As I don't have a floppydrive, I used the FreeDOS OEM CD-ROM disc
    builder assistant to create a bootable CD with the bios update, and set
    it to automatically run the cmdline:

    abitfae.bat AB9_15.BIN

    It seemed to work allright, the flash utility finished and I rebooted.
    I then cleared the CMOS and set it up again with the old settings after
    checking that the version was correct.
    I had no problems bootoing into Windows (I'm running MCE). The machine
    has been running for a few days without problems. The issues I had with
    sound before flashing were gone, so I was happy. After some days I
    wanted to change a simple BIOS setting, so I restarted the mashine,
    which until then had been either running or in standby. When I got to
    the POST screen, I got the CMOS CHECKSUM ERROR message again. It was a
    little suspicious, so I pressed F1 to see if I could boot to Windows.
    No problem.
    I restarted the machine again, and this time there was nothing...not
    even the POST screen.

    The current status is that after manually clearing the CMOS using
    ccmos1 jumper, I can boot the machine and get to POST the CHECKSUM
    ERROR message. But no matter what I do, I can't boot the machine again
    until I have manually cleared the CMOS once more.

    Any ideas?
     
    Michael Ingeman-Nielsen, Dec 10, 2006
    #1
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  2. Michael Ingeman-Nielsen

    peter Guest

    CMOS checksum errors

    Explanation: A checksum is computed as an error-detecting code, to protect
    the BIOS settings stored in the CMOS memory. Each time the system is booted
    this number is recomputed and checked against the stored value. If they do
    not match, an error message is generated to tell you that the CMOS memory
    contents may have been corrupted and therefore some settings may be wrong.
    BIOSes react in different ways to encountering this sort of error. Some will
    warn the user and then continue on with whatever settings were in the CMOS.
    Others will assume that the settings that were in the CMOS were corrupted
    and will load default values stored in the BIOS chip "for safety reasons".
    The error message will indicate which your system is doing.

    Diagnosis: The most common cause of checksum errors in CMOS is a battery
    that is losing power. Viruses can also affect CMOS settings, and motherboard
    problems can also affect the stored values.

    Recommendation: Follow the instructions in this section to address the CMOS
    corruption. You should make sure that all of the BIOS settings in the system
    are correct, by rebooting the system, going into BIOS setup and
    double-checking all the values (hopefully against a recent BIOS settings
    backup).



    peter
     
    peter, Dec 10, 2006
    #2
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  3. Michael Ingeman-Nielsen wrote:
    |
    | Hi
    |
    | I have recently tried to flash my Abit AB9 PRO mobo with the
    | latest bios version (15), mainly to get the following improvements
    | (from the bios download page):
    |
    | 7. Audio now works as intended after resuming from S3.
    | 8. The function "wake on LAN" now works as intemded.
    |
    | Now I get the CMOS CHECKSUM ERROR message that many before
    | me have encountered. I have followed all the advice I have found that
    | did not involve changing the hardware.
    |
    | The process was the following:
    | As I don't have a floppydrive, I used the FreeDOS OEM CD-ROM
    | disc builder assistant to create a bootable CD with the bios update,
    | and set it to automatically run the cmdline:
    |
    | abitfae.bat AB9_15.BIN
    |
    | It seemed to work allright, the flash utility finished and I rebooted.
    | I then cleared the CMOS and set it up again with the old settings
    | after checking that the version was correct.
    | I had no problems bootoing into Windows (I'm running MCE). The
    | machine has been running for a few days without problems. The
    | issues I had with sound before flashing were gone, so I was happy.
    | After some days I wanted to change a simple BIOS setting, so I
    | restarted the mashine, which until then had been either running or in
    | standby. When I got to the POST screen, I got the CMOS CHECKSUM
    | ERROR message again. It was a little suspicious, so I pressed F1 to
    | see if I could boot to Windows.
    | No problem.
    | I restarted the machine again, and this time there was nothing...not
    | even the POST screen.
    |
    | The current status is that after manually clearing the CMOS using
    | ccmos1 jumper, I can boot the machine and get to POST the CHECKSUM
    | ERROR message. But no matter what I do, I can't boot the machine again
    | until I have manually cleared the CMOS once more.
    |
    | Any ideas?
    |

    Hi Michael -

    The switches in Abitfae.bat are set to clear the CMOS to Failsafe Defaults.
    Clearing the CMOS manually with the CCMOS1 jumper does the same thing.

    Pressing F1 does nothing to correct the BIOS running the computer at
    Failsafe Defaults.

    Instead you need to press DEL at the POST screen to get into the BIOS setup
    screens. Once there first choose the option to Load Optimized Defaults.
    This will set your front side bus and CPU to the correct settings and will
    detect your memory timing defaults.

    From there you'll need to re-establish your boot devices and make any other
    customizations you made to the CMOS when you first set the BIOS up .. these
    will also be reset to defaults.

    After you've made your changes, choose Save and Exit Setup. Allow the
    computer to reboot (saving your changes to CMOS memory). The CMOS Checksum
    Error will be gone and, if you've set up your boot devices correctly, you
    should have no problems booting into your OS.

    Jef
     
    Bird Janitor®, Dec 11, 2006
    #3
  4. Hi.

    Thank you for your answer. Unfortunately it is still not working for
    me. Having restored the bios settings as you describe, I pressed F10 to
    save and exit. After the reboot, I got a blanck screen. I could hear
    the HD spin up, spin down and up again as if the machine rebooted once
    more, and then...nothing. Dead computer. I have to reset the CMOS to
    get it to POST again.

    Any more advise?

    thanks
    Michael


    Bird Janitor® skrev:
     
    Michael Ingeman-Nielsen, Dec 21, 2006
    #4
  5. Hi

    Thank you for your response.
    I'm quite sure it is not the CMOS battery, as the motherboard is brand
    new, and the clock is not reset when the power is cut.

    If you have any other suggestions, I would much apprechiate it.
    Thanks
    Michael

    peter skrev:
     
    Michael Ingeman-Nielsen, Dec 21, 2006
    #5
  6. Michael Ingeman-Nielsen wrote:
    |
    | Hi.
    |
    | Thank you for your answer. Unfortunately it is still not working
    | for me. Having restored the bios settings as you describe, I
    | pressed F10 to save and exit. After the reboot, I got a blanck
    | screen. I could hear the HD spin up, spin down and up again
    | as if the machine rebooted once more, and then...nothing.
    | Dead computer. I have to reset the CMOS to get it to POST
    | again.
    |
    | Any more advise?
    |
    | thanks
    | Michael

    Hi Michael -

    A weak or under-powered PSU can be the culprit for failure to retain your
    BIOS settings.

    You have a power-hungry board, which makes heavy demands on the +12v rail.

    Please post back the make and maximum rated wattage of your PSU, along with
    the ratings for the +12v, +5v and +3.3v rails. This information can usually
    be found on the label on the side of the PSU itself.

    Jef
     
    Bird Janitor®, Dec 21, 2006
    #6
  7. I'm using the mCubed EF28 external fanless 280W for a hfx mini case.
    you can find the
    ratings for the PSU at
    http://www.mcubed-store.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=179

    I'd be surprised if that is the problem though. The problem only
    started after flashing the BIOS. Before I flashed it, I had no problems
    at all with rebooting the computer.

    /Michael

    Bird Janitor® skrev:
     
    Michael Ingeman-Nielsen, Dec 22, 2006
    #7
  8. Michael Ingeman-Nielsen wrote:
    |
    | I'm using the mCubed EF28 external fanless 280W for a hfx
    | mini case. you can find the ratings for the PSU at
    | http://www.mcubed-store.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=179
    |
    | I'd be surprised if that is the problem though. The problem only
    | started after flashing the BIOS. Before I flashed it, I had no
    | problems at all with rebooting the computer.
    |
    | /Michael

    While I'm not personally familiar with either your motherboard or your PSU,
    I'd have serious reservations about running any current motherboard with a
    280W PSU with only 15A on the +12V rail .. ideally I'd look at something
    like 24A+ on the +12V rail.

    It could be coincidence that you've suddenly found issues with booting
    reliably, but Abit does change timings, etc., from one BIOS to the next.
    What may have worked with the last release may be tipping your rig over the
    edge on the next.

    You can test if your PSU is on its way out by flashing back to the previous
    version, manually clearing then reprogramming the CMOS.

    If flashing back solves your issues with the board not saving your settings
    from one boot to the next, you've probably eliminated the PSU as an
    immediate problem. I wouldn't rule it out long-term, however.

    Have a look at the Socket T/LGA775 page at Abit's USA forum:
    http://forum.abit-usa.com .. there are quite a few threads on your board
    and, given that the forum gets more traffic than this NG, you're likely to
    benefit from posting there for a solution as well.

    Jef
     
    Bird Janitor®, Dec 22, 2006
    #8
  9. I have actually tried to re-flash the bios with the original version,
    but wasn't successful. Luckily the unsuccessfull flash didn't do any
    harm.

    I'll have a look at the abit forum. Thank you.
    Michael

    Bird Janitor® skrev:
     
    Michael Ingeman-Nielsen, Dec 22, 2006
    #9
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