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First Geforce GTX 480 Review

Discussion in 'Nvidia' started by Kent_Diego, Mar 27, 2010.

  1. Kent_Diego

    Kent_Diego Guest

    Kent_Diego, Mar 27, 2010
    #1
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  2. Kent_Diego

    KCB Guest

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  3. Kent_Diego

    Peter Dassow Guest

    Not all users need 3 monitors (and you have to pay for 3 monitors also,
    that's usually not a gift).
    Also, GTX 470 and GTX480 scales a lot of better for DX11 titles.
    The only negative point is power consumption, nothing else.
    See for a GTX470 review also here:
    http://www.hardocp.com/article/2010/03/26/nvidia_fermi_gtx_470_480_sli_review

    Regards
    Peter
     
    Peter Dassow, Mar 28, 2010
    #3
  4. Am 28.03.2010 09:52, * Peter Dassow:
    Not really.
    The conclusion doesn't seem to be as optimistic as you view:

    "So, GF100 is here, and we’ve been playing new DX11 games on it for a
    straight week, working ourselves through games such as Metro 2033 and
    Bad Company 2 and Aliens vs. Predator. Our first impression with the
    GeForce GTX 480 and GeForce GTX 470 is that nothing really wowed us in
    our gaming experiences with the cards. The one thing that stood out in
    our minds was, "We’ve already been here before," the Radeon HD 5870 and
    Radeon HD 5850 have been giving us this same experience since last
    year.....The GTX 480 is quite simply not a "Radeon HD 5870 Killer." We
    don’t know if we were supposed to think it would be or not, but with the
    power consumption this beast requires, you would hope it would be
    providing a bit more performance than it is...."

    And that two Geforce GTX 480 in SLI are faster than a Radeon 5970 (which
    is basically a XFire setup of two Radeon 5850s) is hardly surprising,
    and it would be highly embarrassing if this wouldn't be the case if you
    look at the riddiculous price tag.

    Ben
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Mar 28, 2010
    #4
  5. Kent_Diego

    Peter Dassow Guest

    So just buy 3 and an ATI card. What's the problem ? If your decision is
    for ATI, fine. I will go with nVidia for another reason: Because I made
    negative expirience with so many Catalyst driver versions I can't count.

    Peter
     
    Peter Dassow, Mar 28, 2010
    #5
  6. Am 28.03.2010 21:16, * Peter Dassow:
    I have several PCs here, some with ATI cards and some with Nvidia cards,
    and the Catalyst drivers, and the Catalyst drivers are generally not
    more troublesome than their Nvidia pedants. I don't know with what card
    and what drivers you had problems with but it is very likely that the
    real problem was within something else in your hard- or software. Yes,
    ATI had some really awful drivers for their Rage series of cards, but
    that was over a decade ago. The unified drivers for Radeons are really
    good, and if that wouldn't be the case then for sure every review of ATI
    gfx cards would mention how great this card is but unless the drivers
    get better the card is useless. This isn't the case. Go figure.

    BTW: my latest negative experience with Nvidia drivers wasn't too long
    ago when they messed up with the 196.75. So no, even in Nvidia land not
    everything is nice and perfect.

    Ben
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Mar 29, 2010
    #6
  7. Am 28.03.2010 21:16, * Peter Dassow:
    I have several PCs here, some with ATI cards and some with Nvidia cards,
    and the Catalyst drivers are generally not more troublesome than their
    Nvidia pedants. I don't know with what card and what drivers you had
    problems with but it is very likely that the real problem was within
    something else in your hard- or software. Yes, ATI had some really awful
    drivers for their Rage series of cards, but that was over a decade ago.
    The unified drivers for Radeons are really good, and if that wouldn't be
    the case then for sure every review of ATI gfx cards would mention how
    great this card is but unless the drivers get better the card is
    useless. This isn't the case. Go figure.

    BTW: my latest negative experience with Nvidia drivers wasn't too long
    ago when they really messed up with the 196.75, but at least none of my
    Nvidia cards were damaged (others weren't that lucky, though). So no,
    even in Nvidia land not everything is nice and perfect.

    It usually didn't matter much if you bought ATI or Nvidia as the
    differences in performance were often rather small, however at the
    moment one must be really braindead to buy a Geforce GTX 470/480,
    considering the high price tag and the insane amount of power it draws,
    and the disappointing performance.

    Ben
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Mar 29, 2010
    #7
  8. Kent_Diego

    Peter Dassow Guest

    "Hallo" Benjamin,

    yes, I would agree with you that also some nVdidia driver versions
    failed. But... my last expirience was related with an ATI 5770 and
    really annoying incompatibilities with Star Wars Battlefront II (high
    CPU load, but just with the ATI card), many crashs in games like WoW,
    Aion and even in very old games like Age of Mythology. I was also very
    disappointed about the (missing) speed of the card, compared to my old
    9800GT AMP from Zotac (this 5770 Vapor-X was so expensive - more than
    160 Euros - but wasn't more than 10-20% faster than my 9800GT in many
    games (I do not use high resolution nor DX11, 1440x900 with two monitors
    are my equipment and DX9 is my used graphics standard).
    So in the past, I had no real complaints about nVidia.

    High power consumption sucks, so nVdidia has to improve it. But if
    tesselation is intensively used (read more about the DX11 benchmark
    Unigine Heaven), GTX480 can be even faster than a 5970 ...

    Regards
    Peter
     
    Peter Dassow, Apr 1, 2010
    #8
  9. Am 01.04.2010 12:17, * Peter Dassow:
    I can tell you that the Radeon 5770 is perfectly compatible with the
    games you listed. To me this sounds very clearly that there was
    something else wrong with either the gfx card or your system. Often
    enough the reason for such problems is simply that the old drivers
    haven't been removed completely before the new card and new drivers were
    installed.

    Generally, no matter what gfx card you buy, you can expect that all of
    them work fine with games and other applications. If it doesn't then
    this is usually is no sign of incompatibility (even when it looks like
    the easiest explanation), it simply is a bright sign telling you that
    there is something wrong in your system.

    Issues aside, going from a Geforce 9800GT to a Radeon 5770 is hardly
    worthwile because the performance difference between them is quite small.
    You probably overestimate the value of tesselation (a feature that all
    ATI GPUs support for 9 years now). If all you do is to run the Heaven
    2.0 benchmark all day then maybe a GTX 480 is the best choice (but the
    other issues like power, heat, noise and price are still there!).
    However, for real-world gaming tesselation is new, and considering that
    most games today are cross platform games for PCs and consoles (and more
    often also without the PC!) this means that tesselation will only see a
    mild use for the near future. And once it becomes a widely supported and
    heavily used feature any (at that time current) 100EUR card will easily
    outperform the GTX 480 with less noise and much lower power consumption.
    As AMD is coming up with a new line of cards in fall (which very likely
    will by then again outperform Nvidia's latest) it is also very likely
    that the GTX 470/480 will see a very short market life.

    I'm sure Nvidia will get their act together and come up with something
    better, but at the moment buying a GTX 480 would be just silly.

    Ben
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Apr 5, 2010
    #9
  10. Kent_Diego

    Peter Dassow Guest

    That's what I call in german "frommer Wunsch" (can't translate it
    directly, "wishful thinking" may be).
    Compatibility with games is always depending from the maturity of a
    driver. In that case, may be it was related with the first AT catalyst
    driver which supports the HD5770 also.
    But, *I* tested it more than twice, I had *no* problems before using the
    HD5770, and afterwards, I had no problems too with the above mentioned
    games. So it *must* be related with the driver version I used, and at
    this time, there was no other version which supports the HD5770 (it was
    one version before 10.0 I remember).
    Usually I am always trying to get rid of the drivers of the "old" card
    before swapping to the new video card. So I used uninstall AND a
    specific nVidia driver cleaning tool. That's all you can do (or do you
    always reinstalling Windows just for swapping a video card ? Ridiculous...).
    It seems you're a convinced ATI fan, so I should try to talk about it
    further.

    Regards
    Peter
     
    Peter Dassow, Apr 6, 2010
    #10
  11. Am 06.04.2010 12:02, * Peter Dassow:
    No, it's not a "frommer Wunsch" (for which "wishful thinking" would
    indeed be the proper translation), it's simply a fact. You can be sure
    that AMD wouldn't sell a single card if the compatibility with games
    would be lacking, and it for sure would have been mentioned in any
    review out there. This isn't the case, so either AMD is silently and
    successfully bribing or threatening everyone to shut up, or the Radeon
    cards work perfectly fine with the games out there. Out of own
    experience I'd say the latter, unless you want to imply that all
    magazines like the German c't Magazin (which like other magazines or
    websites never mentioned any game compatibility issues with any ATI card
    of the last decade or so) have been silenced by AMD.
    Not really, this comes down to driver quality and even more to how much
    game developers deviate from common standardized APIs. In fact, driver
    updates often fix problems that are actually in the games and only show
    up in certain circumstances.

    Driver maturity comes into play when new hardware has to be supported,
    especially when the new card uses a completely new and different
    architecture to the other supported cards. The result is usually a less
    than optimal performance, however stability problems are very rare.
    Therefore it is recommend to wait for at least a single subsequent
    driver revision being available before buying a new gfx card,
    irrespective of the brand.
    Your logic is overly simplistic and narrow-minded, because you obviously
    just didn't change the driver but also a piece of hardware (gfx card).
    This alone changes a shitload of parameters which even when not seen by
    you are still present (and those parameters aside, it could as well have
    been a simple defective card which just would have needed replacement).
    And not every problem has to be noticable by the user, for example some
    memory problems might go unnoticed for years unless something in the
    configuration changes.
    So in short all you tried was a *single* driver release which as you say
    was the first version actually supporting the at that time new Radeon
    5700 series cards. This very much contradicts your former statement ("I
    will go with nVidia for another reason: Because I made negative
    expirience with so many Catalyst driver versions I can't count.") which
    following your own other statements seems to be a blatant lie.
    No, you don't need to re-install Windows for swapping a gfx card. But
    you should be sure to really remove old drivers completely, otherwise
    issues can arise (even when going from ATI to Nvidia). Also, software
    that likes to interfere with the removal process (like virus scanners or
    the widespread pseudo-security suites) should be deactivated beforehand,
    or the removal may end up being not as complete as one might think.
    No, I'm not. In fact, the majority of my computers run Nvidia cards.
    However, having developed quite a bit of hardware and software myself
    and due to my experience with a noticable amount of systems I know of
    the issues of both camps, and therefore I probably have a less
    simplistic way than "ATI is just crap", and I don't have to define
    myself over the brand name on the gfx card.

    But then, *someone* has to buy the overpriced GTX480 cards ;-)

    Ben
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Apr 6, 2010
    #11
  12. Am 29.03.2010 00:59, * Steve:
    Indeed, Nvidia probably shouldn't have killed the GTX 200 series so quickly.

    Ben
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Apr 6, 2010
    #12
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