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FPGA communication, I2C and DAC

Discussion in 'Embedded' started by redstripe, Feb 28, 2006.

  1. redstripe

    redstripe Guest

    I would like to use an FPGA for a motor control application. I have
    worked with FPGAs before and am comfortable with what needs to be done
    inside the FPGA, where I need some advice is how to interface the FPGA
    with the outside world. At the end of the chain I need to generate an
    analog command voltage (multiple channels actually). My initial idea
    was to use a Cypress PSOC as the DAC and talk between the FPGA and PSOC
    using the I2C protocol. I've used I2C between multiple PSOCs and have
    had no problems, the question is how difficult it would be to implement
    an I2C master in the FPGA (I'm looking at using an Altera Cyclone II).
    Along those lines, I also would like to have communication between
    multiple FPGA based motor controllers. Again, I was thinking I2C.

    Does anyone see any major hangups or problems with this approach? Any
    simpler implementation I am overlooking? What is the most common form
    of digital communication used with an FPGA? How about interfacing to a
    DAC?

    Thanks
    Jim
     
    redstripe, Feb 28, 2006
    #1
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  2. redstripe

    Artenz Guest

    Here's one:

    http://www.opencores.org/projects.cgi/web/i2c/overview
    You could use SPI, it's slightly simpler, and usually a lot faster.

    Note that both I2C and SPI are meant for short range (same board)
    communications. If you want longer range, you can use RS232, RS485,
    Can,...

    Do you have a good reason for not using a microcontroller instead of an
    FPGA ?
     
    Artenz, Mar 1, 2006
    #2
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