free space on ext. USB drives

Discussion in 'Apple' started by William Hanna, Nov 23, 2010.

  1. I have more than 2 TBs of media files (MP3s and video) on external USB
    drives. Two of the drives are archives now... they're full and are not
    being written to. How much free space should I leave on them. They're
    both 1 TB drives. Thanks.
     
    William Hanna, Nov 23, 2010
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. William Hanna

    Király Guest

    A volume that has Mac OS X installed on it needs free space for booting
    and running. If your drives don't fall into that category and you
    don't need to leave room for adding new files, there's no need to
    leave any free space on them. Volumes that won't be written to don't
    need free space.
     
    Király, Nov 23, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. William Hanna

    Lewis Guest

    You don't have to leave any space free if the drive is only for data.

    That said, I usually leave about 5-10G free just in case I need to move
    some stuff around (regardless of drive size).
     
    Lewis, Nov 24, 2010
    #3
  4. William Hanna

    dorayme Guest

    But what if it gets unusally cold and it shrinks, would it not be
    safer to have some free space where the vacuum can be compressed
    without harm?
     
    dorayme, Nov 24, 2010
    #4
  5. William Hanna

    Richie

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    1 TB? i think it's hard to find.:(
     
    Richie, Nov 24, 2010
    #5
  6. William Hanna

    Király Guest

    Not at all. Random data is comprised of ones and zeros. Free space is
    all zeros. Ones, being narrow and skinny, compress better than round
    fat zeros. Writing all ones to the unused space on a disk gives best
    compressibility. But a disk full of a mix of one and zeros is still
    better than giving unused free space to zeros.
     
    Király, Nov 24, 2010
    #6
  7. William Hanna

    Tom Stiller Guest

    Compressing a vacuum? That ranks right up there with satellite in polar
    geosynchronous orbits
     
    Tom Stiller, Nov 24, 2010
    #7
  8. That's why i always buy drives in pairs. Everything is backed up.
     
    William Hanna, Nov 24, 2010
    #8
  9. But, but, I've found a way to write nothing to the space heretofor
    occupied by fat 0s and skinny 1s.. So nothing compresses better than
    something, especially as it's already compressed to its max. (ie.
    nothing, and everything.). Now, the vacuum part is new to me, and I have
    to undertake further research.....

    Happy Bird day to all who observe the day the first invaders of US
    shared a meal with its native people. And for the rest, Happy Thanksgiving.
     
    John McWilliams, Nov 24, 2010
    #9
  10. William Hanna

    dorayme Guest

    It was meant as a vacuum in the sense of being vacant! Anyway,
    Kirily says it is not vacant but filled with 0s (or can be 1's or
    both). <g>
     
    dorayme, Nov 24, 2010
    #10
  11. William Hanna

    dorayme Guest

    That spoils my little party! <g>
     
    dorayme, Nov 24, 2010
    #11
  12. William Hanna

    Tom Stiller Guest

    Except in the most esoteric laboratory experiments.
     
    Tom Stiller, Nov 24, 2010
    #12
  13. William Hanna

    JF Mezei Guest

    I don't think you worded it correctly. Newer drives write the 1s and 0s
    vertically (standing up) instead of laying down on the surface of the
    drive. This way, they each take up the same amount of space (writing a
    thin 1 does waste some space since the track has to be wide enough to
    accomodate the fat 0 standing up.) If disks contained only 1s, they
    could make the tracks narrower and thus increase disk capacity. But then
    the 1s could complain like coach passengers on a plane of not having
    enough legroom.
     
    JF Mezei, Nov 24, 2010
    #13
  14. William Hanna

    JF Mezei Guest

    Compressing a vacuum is perfectly possible. You have X volume containing
    vacuum. You reduce the volume of the container and you now have the same
    amount of vacuum inside a smaller volume, so it is compressed.

    However, there are no real instruments capable of measuring this :)

    What is amazing is that NASA has yet to be able to make a vacuum cleaner
    that works in the vacuum of space. Such a vacuum cleaner would help
    clean up low earth orbit that is full of debris, abandonned satellites
    and tons of navel lint that has collected there without ever being cleaned.

    While NASA has failed, Hollywood did build a space capable vacuum
    cleaner once, but it ended up sucking all the air of the planet druidia.
    This vacuum cleaner was able to transform itself into a large ship and
    travel at ludicrous speeds. Dark Helmet was its captain/general. In its
    vacuum cleaner mode, it had a large head similar to the statue of
    liberty. An explosion caused it to crash on a beach on the planet below,
    with the head and arm sticking out of the sand, reminiscent of what will
    happen when earth destroys itself and apes rule what is left of the earth.

    Note that one major problem with space vaccum cleaners has been best
    described in a documentary about a pink panther where the vacuum cleaner
    sucks itself out of existence, creating a vacuum in another dimension.
     
    JF Mezei, Nov 24, 2010
    #14
  15. I don't think you worded it correctly. Newer drives write the 1s and 0s
    vertically (standing up) instead of laying down on the surface of the
    drive. This way, they each take up the same amount of space (writing a
    thin 1 does waste some space since the track has to be wide enough to
    accomodate the fat 0 standing up.) If disks contained only 1s, they
    could make the tracks narrower and thus increase disk capacity. But then
    the 1s could complain like coach passengers on a plane of not having
    enough legroom.[/QUOTE]

    But they save the zeros sideways, so they take the same width as the 1.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Nov 25, 2010
    #15
  16. William Hanna

    dorayme Guest

    But that assumes that the vacuum in the larger space took up all
    the room. Maybe the vaccum is always what it was, whatever it
    was, and the *air* around it is compressed.
     
    dorayme, Nov 25, 2010
    #16
  17. William Hanna

    Wes Groleau Guest

    But what if your zeros are hex instead of round?

    --
    Wes Groleau

    “What you see and hear depends a good deal on where you are standing;
    it also depends on what kind of person you are.â€
    -- C.S.Lewis
     
    Wes Groleau, Nov 25, 2010
    #17
  18. William Hanna

    Wes Groleau Guest

    Did you mean to type _b_ and _a_ there?
     
    Wes Groleau, Nov 25, 2010
    #18
  19. I had hexed zeroes once, but I was able to get them exorcized.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Nov 25, 2010
    #19
  20. Best line from that movie: "Funny, she doesn't look Druish."[/QUOTE]

    And from The Yellow Submarine movie: "Are you Bluish? You don't look
    Bluish."
     
    Michelle Steiner, Nov 26, 2010
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.