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FX5200 vs Quadro NVS 280 for older PC

Discussion in 'Nvidia' started by Marc D. Williams, Mar 3, 2010.

  1. I have a Dell OptiPlex GX260 (discarded from my job) that I figure
    I'll use as a replacement for my aging (old really) current machine.
    Pentium 4, 2GHz, 2GB RAM, integrated Intel 845G graphics w/shared memory.
    It's small form factor so the power supply is only about 160W.

    The setup I've been using for the past five years is an IBM ThinkPad T21,
    Pentium III, 800MHz, 512MB RAM. For the past three years it's been
    permanently docked, acting as a desktop. It runs WinXP Pro and Slackware
    Linux 12.2. In the dock is a PNY Nvidia Quadro NVS 280 PCI card driving
    two 19" monitors.
    This setup has worked great but the lack of memory has always been
    a problem. Not to mention Mozilla's stuff has gotten bigger, slower,
    and memory hungry.

    Anyhind, for the OptiPlex video card choices are limited due to
    power requirements and such.
    Since I'm looking to duplicate my current setup the video cards
    should have a DMS-59 connector.
    So I now have two video cards, a supposedly Dell branded Nvidia
    Quadro NVS 280 AGP w/64MB RAM and a GeForce FX5200 AGP w/128MB.
    Both are SFF with DMS-59 connectors.
    Much to Dell's credit they have manuals online for these (and almost
    anything else they've ever had going back to the 80386 days) so I was
    able to verify power requirements/usage.

    At the moment the FX5200 is installed and working with WinXP Pro and
    OpenSolaris 2009.06.
    Works fine but I was just wondering if there's any reason to
    consider one over the other? Gaming is not something I do (other than
    the occasional old-school side-scroller) and video is usually limited
    to small mpegs or wmv. The latter almost unplayable on the ThinkPad
    and WinXP though not too bad under Linux.

    Thanks,
    and sorry if I included too much just to get to one little question. :)
     
    Marc D. Williams, Mar 3, 2010
    #1
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  2. Marc D. Williams

    deimos Guest

    Chipset wise they are almost identical. The bus and memory differs
    mainly. I suppose NV also disables a few things in the driver to
    differentiate the workstation part as well. I would tend to think the
    5200 might have a higher geometry rate just because of the higher
    clocks; but I don't know that for sure (disregarding gaming).

    Also, DMS-59 has only ever been used to drive 2 VGA connections or
    sometimes DVI, unless a regular height card physically doesn't fit in
    the case; there's no particular reason to require it.
     
    deimos, Mar 3, 2010
    #2
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  3. Yeah. I reckon what I might do is find some sort of (simple) testing
    tool and compare the two. This would probably require uninstalling and
    re-installing drivers (IF I were to use nvidia's version recommendations
    when selecting a card type). But hey, I like experimenting anyway.
    I mentioned the DMS-59 because the Quadro in the ThinkPad's dock
    has one. Using dual-DVI connection to drive two monitors.

    When I was looking at cards they either had a single
    VGA d-sub, a single DVI, or one of each. Assuming the cards with
    one VGA and one DVI allowed for simultaneous use it would require
    a DVI-to-VGA adapter to work with two monitors.

    The ThinkPad's Quadro card is connected to each of the two monitor's
    DVI connectors. Luckily the monitors also have VGA connectors so
    while I'm transitioning the ThinkPad doesn't have to be disconnected
    while I test the Dell.

    Marc
     
    Marc D. Williams, Mar 4, 2010
    #3
  4. Am 03.03.2010 23:19, * deimos:
    No, they are not. The Quadro NVS 280 is a 2D card with just very
    rudimentary 3D functionality, the Geforce FX 5200 on the other side is a
    full 3D card.

    Benjamin
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Mar 4, 2010
    #4
  5. Am 03.03.2010 23:01, * Marc D. Williams:
    Unless you run some professional 2D applications which require a
    certified graphics solution go for the Geforce FX5200. The Quadro NVS
    280 is a 2D card while the Geforce FX 5200 is a 3D card which fully
    supports OpenGL and Direct3D.

    Benjamin
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Mar 4, 2010
    #5
  6. Sounds good. I'll keep the Quadro around as a backup then or throw it
    into an old Win2K machine.
    Thanks,
    Marc
     
    Marc D. Williams, Mar 4, 2010
    #6
  7. Marc D. Williams

    deimos Guest

    From what I can find the NVS280 can be either NV18 based or NV34. NV18
    would be similar to GF4MX and NV34 is of course the underwhelming 5200.
     
    deimos, Mar 5, 2010
    #7
  8. Am 05.03.2010 00:02, * deimos:
    The Quadro NVS series is *based* on stripped-down 3D GPUs of older
    generations but they are not the same. Just try running some 3D games on
    a Quadro NVS.

    Benjamin
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Mar 5, 2010
    #8
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