GA-7VRXP: rev. 1.0 or 2.0? And FSB 333?

Discussion in 'Gigabyte' started by Mike, Apr 15, 2004.

  1. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Hello,

    I have a Gigabyte 7VRXP, bought in july 2002. No problems (except Top
    Performance won't work) and I'm quite happy with it. But after some searching I
    still cannot the answers to some questions. Maybe someone here can help me?

    1. How can I see if I have the 1.0/1.1/2.0 version? The board itself says
    2.0~~~~~~~~~~~ but both WCPUID and SiSoft Sandra 2004 say 1.0 What is it?
    2. How do I know if a 333MHz processor (like a Athlon 2800) will work on this
    board? Can I just increase the FSB to 166?

    The reason is that I would like to upgrade, not too expensive. A new processor
    is 'nessessary' but Athlon 2600 is too slow. 2800 is cheap, FSB 333 together
    with my DDR333 wil give a nice boost. I understand that the 7VRXP officially
    doesn't support a FBS of 333 but the KT333 should, right?

    Can anyone help me?

    Greetings and thanks in advance,
    Mike (from The Netherlands)
     
    Mike, Apr 15, 2004
    #1
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  2. Always trust what is printed on the board itself. Software that
    apparently reports PCB revisions either fills in random numbers or reads
    the DMI config table, and I doubt anyone filled real values there
    (typically only large OEMs care to properly update the DMI config table
    to properly reflect the aspects of the hardware they sell you). 1.0 is a
    standard default for 'first shipping' revisions so if the software finds
    an empty DMI value there it might well assume an 1.0 revision as a
    default. Plus, there's no mention of an 1.0 revision on Gigabyte's site.
    Therefore, you have a 2.0 board.
    For 100% proper operation you need:
    a) a BIOS that can identify the processor and adjust to its
    peculiarities (if any).
    b) proper voltage regulation and signal paths
    c) proper chipset support

    I don't own the board but chances are you'll at least be able to boot
    with the FSB at 166 MHz.
    Yes it should. But there might be good reasons Gigabyte doesn't
    officially support 333 MHz on this board. See b) above.

    Regards
    Nikos
     
    Nikolaos Tampakis, Apr 16, 2004
    #2
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  3. This board only supports 266MHz FSB CPU's (133MHz CPU Clock). That is the
    limitation of the VIA KT333 chipset.

    The memory can be run asynchronously at +33MHz higher than the CPU giving a
    166MHz memory clock (DDR333). There is an SDRAM Frequency setting in the
    BIOS Chipset Features Setup menu where you can choose 333MHz if you so
    desire.
     
    Homer J. Simpson, Apr 16, 2004
    #3
  4. (snip)
    Well, it should according to http://www.via.com.tw/en/apollo/KT333.jsp
    but apparently this isn't the whole story since in the chipset's white
    paper only up to 266 MHz bus is mentioned.
    Apparently official 333 MHz support was added with a later revision and
    VIA conveniently choose to not mention it in the link above.

    Regards
    Nikos
     
    Nikolaos Tampakis, Apr 16, 2004
    #4
  5. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Well, it should according to http://www.via.com.tw/en/apollo/KT333.jsp
    So, you're saying probably the KT333 will work with a Athlon 2800 @ FSB 333 but
    it's not guaranteed by Gigabyte and VIA. Just increase the FSB in the BIOS
    manually to 166MHz.

    Mike
     
    Mike, Apr 16, 2004
    #5
  6. Mike

    Mike Guest

    This board only supports 266MHz FSB CPU's (133MHz CPU Clock). That is the
    Why is it then that VIA says it KT333 supports FBS333?
    http://www.via.com.tw/en/apollo/KT333.jsp

    And why does other boards with KT333 support FSB333? Am I missing something
    here?

    TIA
    Mike
     
    Mike, Apr 16, 2004
    #6
  7. As I commented in the other post,
    http://www.via.com.tw/en/apollo/KT333.jsp is apparently not the whole
    story. The whitepaper for KT333 does not list 333 MHz bus support.
    Also, two Asus boards with the KT333, the A7V333 and the A7V333-X, are
    listed with 266 and 333 MHz bus support respectively.
    And the latter has a 'CF' designation for the KT333 chipset, so it's
    rather obvious that (a) specific revision(s) of the KT333 add(s) the 333
    MHz bus support.
    VIA really ought to have mentioned this disparity between different
    revisions in the page above.

    Regards
    Nikos
     
    Nikolaos Tampakis, Apr 16, 2004
    #7
  8. More or less. The bottomline is you'll have to try and see.

    Regards
    Nikos
     
    Nikolaos Tampakis, Apr 16, 2004
    #8
  9. With this particular Gigabyte board, the KT333CE chipset is what Gigabyte
    used. I haven't heard of anyone successfully maintaining a 166MHz CPU clock
    on a GA-7VRXP Ver. 2. After a reboot it always reverts back to 133MHz.
    There is no BIOS support, even in the last official BIOS version for this
    board, that will enable the 1/5th divider required to maintain a 166MHz CPU
    clock without it reverting back to 133MHz after a reboot.

    The KT333CF chipset does support 333MHz FSB, but that doesn't help here.
     
    Homer J. Simpson, Apr 17, 2004
    #9
  10. Mike

    Mike Guest

    As I understand correctly, the KT333 is just a KT266a with DDR333 support,
    right? And that's why it will not support a 166MHz CPU clock. Alltough later
    versions of the KT333 do support that.

    But I read here that the CD will not support FSB333 and the CE will:
    http://groups.google.nl/groups?hl=n...46940$#link1
    I am sorry if I sound stubborn, I am not trying to troll or so, but I am trying
    to understand (Technicaly I'm quite a newbie...). Are you sure I have the
    KT333CE? The Gigabyte site speaks only of a south bridge CE.

    Thanks for your help,
    Mike
     
    Mike, Apr 17, 2004
    #10
  11. More or less. Quoting VIA's site:
    "Building on the unprecedented power and reliability of the VIA Apollo
    KT266A, the VIA Apollo KT333..."
    Furthermore they're pin-to-pin compatible so not much in difference
    other than the memory speed.
    Yes the CE southbridge should be the VT8233A (the board I have uses the
    VT8233 and it's marked as CD). CF will certainly support 166 MHz, as for
    CE I don't know but the A7V333 from Asus which also uses the CE revision
    is not listed with 166 MHz support (the A7V333-X which uses the CF is).
    The 1/5th divider is certainly supported though.

    Regards
    Nikos
     
    Nikolaos Tampakis, Apr 17, 2004
    #11
  12. Mike

    Mike Guest

    At first, Nikos, thanks for your help!
    I was afraid so...
    How do I know for certain which revision I have? I mean, the Gigabyte's site is
    not the most trustworthy... ;)
    Uhhh, do you mean that my chipset *IS* supporting the 1/5 divider necessary to
    get a FSB of 333? Mmm, I qoute someone who's saying my bios is not supporting
    it...

    TIA!
    Mike
     
    Mike, Apr 17, 2004
    #12
  13. Uncover the northbridge. You could also use a PCI scan tool and obtain a
    revision number value, then compare to the value of a known revision.
    From what I gathered, (at least) the CE chipset does have the 1/5th
    divider but is NOT certified for 333 MHz bus freq. Your wording is a bit
    strange - the 1/5h divider is not a neccesity for 333 MHz bus freq. It
    is a necessity for 33 MHz PCI/66 MHz AGP freqs. at bus freq. of 166 MHz.
    I see it more as an overclocking convenience - IF you somehow get a
    stable 166 MHz bus on a CE revision, THEN you can also have the
    possibility to run PCI and AGP at nominal freqs. with the 1/5th divider.
    Its implementation or not however by the motherboard maker is a
    different story.

    Regards
    Nikos
     
    Nikolaos Tampakis, Apr 17, 2004
    #13
  14. Mike

    Kevin Lawton Guest

    <snip>
    | From what I gathered, (at least) the CE chipset does have the 1/5th
    | divider but is NOT certified for 333 MHz bus freq. Your wording is a
    | bit strange - the 1/5h divider is not a neccesity for 333 MHz bus
    | freq. It
    | is a necessity for 33 MHz PCI/66 MHz AGP freqs. at bus freq. of 166
    | MHz.
    | I see it more as an overclocking convenience - IF you somehow get a
    | stable 166 MHz bus on a CE revision, THEN you can also have the
    | possibility to run PCI and AGP at nominal freqs. with the 1/5th
    | divider.
    | Its implementation or not however by the motherboard maker is a
    | different story.

    Some of my systems use the GA-7VRXP Rev 2.0, and they do not appear to have
    any way of setting the FSB clock to 166 MHz. On this board, the FSB clock is
    set using a small on-board switch which selects between 100 MHz or 133 MHz -
    there just isn't a 166 MHz option available to use. The CPU clock multiplier
    is also set by on-board switches, but that is another matter.
    The DDR memory clock speed on the GA-7VRXP is set in the BIOS. Either 100
    MHz, 133 MHz or 166 MHz can be selected from the BIOS set-up screen, giving
    DDR200, DDR266 or DDR333 respectively.
    The processor FSB and the memory bus are different and set up seperately -
    it is important not to confuse the two.
    AFAIK the '333' is the KT333 chipset name refers to the maximum memory bus
    speed (DDR333) and not to the processor FSB speed.
    Kevin.
     
    Kevin Lawton, May 3, 2004
    #14
  15. It all boils down to the clock generator installed and its wiring. A
    possibility is that Gigabyte used a clock generator that can't be
    programmed in the first place for 166 MHz CPU bus output. Another (more
    likely?) senario is that the clock generator is capable of 166 MHz
    (datasheets for the clock generators are usually available) but the
    wiring used doesn't offer the means to program it as such, in which case
    some PCB-level action would be necessary to remedy this, more
    specifically to isolate the input pins that determine the CPU bus
    frequency and supply the required logical 0 or 1 to each to program for
    a 166 (or whatever) frequency. There's even the possibility the PCB is
    actually ready to accomodate for 166 MHz (in anticipation of 166 MHz
    capable northbridges) but they didn't install the jumpers/dip switches
    for the proper pins in the clock generator, leaving them instead at a
    fixed logical state and only allowing between 100 and 133 MHz selection
    for the time.
    Yes, that was obviously the original intent. However eventually there
    appeared 166 MHz CPU bus officially capable revisions too (CF). I have
    no idea how widely they were actually used though.

    Regards
    Nikos
     
    Nikolaos Tampakis, May 3, 2004
    #15
  16. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Some of my systems use the GA-7VRXP Rev 2.0, and they do not appear to have
    And I was thinking that when I use a CPU that runs on 166MHz the FSB will
    automatically follow to 333. Am I right or wrong?
    Understood. But you are saying we cannot select a FSB or system bus speed on the
    GA-7VRXP?

    TIA,
    Mike
     
    Mike, May 3, 2004
    #16
  17. Mike

    Kevin Lawton Guest

    || Some of my systems use the GA-7VRXP Rev 2.0, and they do not appear
    || to have any way of setting the FSB clock to 166 MHz. On this board,
    || the FSB clock is set using a small on-board switch which selects
    || between 100 MHz or 133 MHz - there just isn't a 166 MHz option
    || available to use. The CPU clock multiplier is also set by on-board
    || switches, but that is another matter.
    |
    | And I was thinking that when I use a CPU that runs on 166MHz the FSB
    | will automatically follow to 333. Am I right or wrong?
    |
    || The processor FSB and the memory bus are different and set up
    || seperately -
    || it is important not to confuse the two.
    |
    | Understood. But you are saying we cannot select a FSB or system bus
    | speed on the GA-7VRXP?

    No - quite the opposite. You can select the CPU FSB clock speed via a
    switch - either 100 MHz or 133 MHz, and you can select the memory bus speed
    via the BIOS set-up - either 100 MHz, 133 MHz or 166 MHz. That's what I said
    and that's how it is. I've used quite a few of these boards recently and if
    Gigabyte have come out with a version which will facilitate setting the CPU
    FSB clock higher than that then I certainly haven't encountered it. Neither
    am I aware of any 'Revision 3.0' or suchlike variant which might support a
    higher CPU FSB clock rate.
    It is also worth noting that these boards will only support DDR333 memory in
    two memory strips, and not three, whereas DDR200 and DDR266 are supported in
    all three memory slots.
    I felt it worthwhile pointing out that the CPU FSB clock rate and the memory
    bus clock rate are different things, as some newsgroup posters seem to
    confuse the two. Fortunately, on the GA-7VRXP they can be set independently.
    Kevin.
     
    Kevin Lawton, May 3, 2004
    #17
  18. Kevin Lawton wrote:

    (snip)
    This is a very good point and actually further indication that the KT333
    was launched as little more than a quick refix of the KT266A - where
    the top priority was (obviously) that board manufacturers be able to
    reuse existing KT266(A) board designs...

    (snip)

    Regards
    Nikos
     
    Nikolaos Tampakis, May 3, 2004
    #18
  19. Mike

    Kevin Lawton Guest

    | Kevin Lawton wrote:
    |
    | (snip)
    |
    || It is also worth noting that these boards will only support DDR333
    || memory in two memory strips, and not three, whereas DDR200 and
    || DDR266 are supported in all three memory slots.
    |
    | This is a very good point and actually further indication that the
    | KT333 was launched as little more than a quick refix of the KT266A
    | - where
    | the top priority was (obviously) that board manufacturers be able to
    | reuse existing KT266(A) board designs...

    True . . . . . .
    I believe that this process is called 'development' ?
    Kevin.
     
    Kevin Lawton, May 3, 2004
    #19
  20. Mike

    Mike Guest

    I felt it worthwhile pointing out that the CPU FSB clock rate and the memory
    OK. So to conclude we have a FSB or system bus speed that runs on either 100 or
    133 MHz which can be selected at the board with a switch. We have a memory bus
    that runs on 100, 133, or 166 MHz which can be selected through the BIOS. And we
    have a CPU clock speed that can be adjusted through the BIOS from 133 to at
    least 166 MHz. Am I right?

    And a FSB of 166 is simply not possible without alteration of the board, right?

    Thanks for the helping this newbie,
    Mike
     
    Mike, May 3, 2004
    #20
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