Google Chrome takes 6 GB of my hard disk

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Juan I. Cahis, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. Juan I. Cahis

    Daniel Cohen Guest

    We still don't know if that was the OP's issue, though it certainly was
    mine. It's possible that having Vhrome in a subfolder of Applications
    was why my old versions did not delete.
     
    Daniel Cohen, Nov 12, 2013
    #21
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  2. Juan I. Cahis

    Howard Guest

    My package contents contains two versions. Same for Torch. Firefox only
    contains one.
     
    Howard, Nov 12, 2013
    #22
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  3. Juan I. Cahis

    Paul Sture Guest

    Competent programming from the folks who brought you the Google Groups
    interface?

    Well, I never...

    :)
     
    Paul Sture, Nov 12, 2013
    #23
  4. Juan I. Cahis

    Paul Sture Guest

    I used to keep lots of apps in a completely separate folder from
    /Applications but stopped doing so when various updates failed due to
    the developers' assumptions that their app would live there.

    A lousy assumption IMHO.
     
    Paul Sture, Nov 12, 2013
    #24
  5. Google is a *big* company. I doubt very much that there's much overlap
    between the Google Groups programmers and the Google Chrome programmers.
    And Google probably doesn't assign their best programmers to Google
    Groups, since it's not a product that they care very much about, while
    Chrome is an important product that they can't afford to assign minimal
    resources to.
     
    Barry Margolin, Nov 12, 2013
    #25
  6. That is very few in comparison of what the NSA stores about you ;-)
     
    Laszlo Lebrun, Nov 12, 2013
    #26
  7. Juan I. Cahis

    Wes Groleau Guest

    Of all of the apps on my machine, the ONLY ones that make that stupid
    assumption are from Microsoft and from Apple.

    In Apple's case, it might not be stupidity; it might be laziness.
    Since the updater is not part of the application, it has to either
    hard-code a path or use look it up in some log or Receipt or search for
    it. Hard-coding a path is obviously easier.

    But for most others, the updater is part of the app and relative
    addressing is easier. With Office, the updater is in the same directory
    as the app suite, so that's almost the same.

    --
    Wes Groleau

    I won't burn your Koran because I don't want you to burn my Bible;
    but if you burn my Bible, no one's going to die.
    — Robert Rhee
     
    Wes Groleau, Nov 13, 2013
    #27
  8. Juan I. Cahis

    Guest Guest

    apple's updater does hard code paths.
     
    Guest, Nov 13, 2013
    #28
  9. Juan I. Cahis

    Wes Groleau Guest

    Thank you for repeating the obvious.
     
    Wes Groleau, Nov 14, 2013
    #29
  10. Wes, just in case you were still unaware, I wanted to let you know that
    the Apple Updater hard codes paths.
     
    Jamie Kahn Genet, Nov 14, 2013
    #30
  11. The good outweighed the bad IMO (sure as hell I was tired of software
    incompatibilities, bugs and resulting crashes causing system instability
    and corruption in classic MacOS), but I'll always wonder what a
    successful well managed, well staffed development of one of the failed
    replacement MacOSes (Pink, Copeland, BeOS - a possible acquisition
    instead of NeXT OS, at one point, to mention three I recall off the top
    of my head) could have been.

    Still, I was well tired of overenthusiastic MacWorld articles about the
    replacements that never were, by the time NeXT morphed into OS X. By
    then I was just happy to have _any_ modern workable Mac-like
    replacement.
     
    Jamie Kahn Genet, Nov 15, 2013
    #31
  12. Juan I. Cahis

    Lewis Guest

    Well, to be fair I don't think that BeOS was ever anything more than
    something some people outside of Apple thought was a neat idea.

    Pink was interesting though, and I remember (trying to) follow its
    development before it morphed into/was replaced by Copeland which
    somehow never appealed to me.
    Oh, well, no. OS X appealed to me very much because it was UNIX, not
    just because it was newer than Mac OS 8/9. I would have been hard
    pressed to find a reason to switch to a different OS at the time if it
    wasn't for the gains of getting a real¹ UNIX command-line.


    ¹ Albeit, for certain values of 'real' back in 10.0-10.3.
     
    Lewis, Nov 15, 2013
    #32
  13. I don't think a unix base was necessarily the best solution, but I can
    certainly understand why it strongly appealed to some. I'm not knocking
    it as such (I've certainly taken advantage of it! :) ), just wondering
    what might have been.
     
    Jamie Kahn Genet, Nov 15, 2013
    #33
  14. Juan I. Cahis

    Wes Groleau Guest

    I had a "MachTen" Unix add-on in OS 9, so I could continue to give the
    family something usable for non-geeks (which back then Linux was not,
    unless a geek spent way to much time keeping it that way).

    So OS X appealed to me for the same reason. But ALSO for the reason
    that when OS X came out, the stability of an OS 9 environment (meaning
    OS and its apps in general) had been bested by Microsoft.

    OS X saved Apple from oblivion. Yeah, I know, the iPhone did that--I'm
    not so sure Apple would have lived long enough to release iPhone in 2007
    had they not released OS X in 1999. I know that if it were not for OS
    X, I would have been dual-booting Windows and Linux when the iPod
    launched in 2001.
     
    Wes Groleau, Nov 15, 2013
    #34
  15. Doubt that!

    My Chrome has ballooned over the years, keeping all old versions, and
    curable by either downloading a new one, or opening the app's package,
    going to Contents, and deleting old versions.

    It's always been in the apps folder. Mine reached about 4 Gigs a year
    ago, and today was 600 Megs. The clean download, installed just now, is
    149.7 Megs. (Most will be double that number as one previous version
    will be present). For a few of us, all old versions get kept, and I
    don't see anything in Preferences that might set that. Or know what else
    might be borked so the flushing of old versions doesn't take place.
     
    John McWilliams, Nov 17, 2013
    #35
  16. I disabled the GoogleUpdater in

    /Library/LaunchAgents/com.google.keystone.agent.plist

    so now Google won't update until I want it to update. It used to piss
    me off that Google would update out from under me. So now I always
    download and update my copy by hand.

    Problem solved.
     
    Michael Vilain, Nov 17, 2013
    #36
  17. Dear Michael & friends:

    I did a more simple solution, I deleted it. I don't want to do extra work
    when Google releases every security update. With Firefox and Safari I have
    enough of browsers on my Mac.
     
    Juan I. Cahis, Nov 17, 2013
    #37
  18. Juan I. Cahis

    Alan Browne Guest

    I want to do even less. So I use Chrome unless forced to use Safari or FF.
     
    Alan Browne, Nov 17, 2013
    #38
  19. YUP! My Chrome was taking up 8GB, turns out i had every 'version' from mid 2010 on their!
     
    tommysgotamonkey, May 25, 2014
    #39
  20. I solved the problem doing a full uninstall with a cleaning utility, and
    reinstalling it. It is neccessary to do this process from time to time.
     
    Juan I. Cahis, May 25, 2014
    #40
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