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hard drive questions regarding my new Sparc 5.

Discussion in 'Sun Hardware' started by bo snyder, Nov 22, 2003.

  1. bo snyder

    bo snyder Guest

    I am now in the process of trying to find the best type of hard drive
    for my newly acquired sparc 5.

    It has a 1 gig drive that is internal (sca) and it works fine but its
    only a 1 gig drive.

    I do not have any other sca drives though. All i have access to are
    lvd scsi drives. I put them into an exteranl scsi case and used a
    standard 50 pin header to lvd adapter. (are there any problems with
    that?)

    I have been having problems getting the system to recogize these
    drives. They are drives that have been used in windows computers with
    no problems.

    I put the 18 gig drive and then I boot to the redhat 6.2 cd. I start
    the install but it doesn't appear to like the existing data on the
    drive, it fouls out.

    What is the best way to wipe a drive completely for new partitioning
    with linux/solaris?

    Also what size drives are suppored under the sparc 5?
     
    bo snyder, Nov 22, 2003
    #1
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  2. Firstly I do not have experience of DeadRat for Sparc, but
    I do know that it is old and broken.
    Here is the procedure for Solaris.

    If you want Linux you should use Splack or Debian.
    If you are using Linux use fdisk instead of format
    First do a Stop-A during initial boot to get to the OBP.
    probe-scsi-all to see if your drive is recognised.
    boot from Solaris CD
    boot cdrom -s

    format look at the list of drives, note the details of your
    new drive - something like c0t2d0s0
    select a number
    q to quit

    (now the dangerous bit, make sure you get the correct disk - this
    nukes the boot sector and disk label)
    dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/rdsk/c0t2d0s0 bs=512 count=2

    format select your drive
    la writes a new disk label
    q

    The installer should sort out the rest.
    any scsi - no size limit.
     
    Chris Newport, Nov 22, 2003
    #2
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  3. bo snyder

    bo snyder Guest

    Well as soon as I get back from the store, I am going to try your
    ideas. (I blew up my powerstrip and need to replace a fuse in it).

    I am curious though, I keep reading at various places that scsi drives
    for Suns need to have certainn jumpers set. Which does do they need
    set that are not normally set (S/E jumper, etc?).

    Thanks again...
     
    bo snyder, Nov 22, 2003
    #3
  4. The nice thing about SCA drives is that you just plug them in.
    For external drives, the SCSI ID is normally set by a switch on
    the back of the shoebox, you need to connect this in place of the
    ID jumpers. LVD drives should autosense that the Sun is SE, but
    you can usually force this with a jumper.
    Sun machines have a standard for SCSI ID which you should obey.
    1st/boot drive = 3
    2nd drive = 0
    3rd drive = 1
    4th drive = 2
    1st tape = 4
    2nd tape = 5
    CD = 6
     
    Chris Newport, Nov 22, 2003
    #4
  5. This not a standard for all Sun systems, only for a period when sun4c
    and sun4m systems were manufactured. Boot from SCSI ID 3 was introduced
    with the first Sun4c systems (SPARCstation 1) as Sun assumed that
    buyers of these systems wanted to continue to use their external disk
    drives (sun3 desktop systems like the Sun 3/50 didn't have internal
    disks) from their sun3 systems. The external disk drives used with sun3
    systems required that it be opened to change the SCSI ID, so Sun
    thought that making the internal disk of the Sun4c systems be SCSI ID 3
    would make it easier for their customers. This confusing design was
    still in use when the sun4m systems were introduced, but when the sun4u
    (Ultra) systems was introduced the systems once again booted from SCSI
    ID 0.
     
    Goran Larsson, Nov 23, 2003
    #5
  6. bo snyder

    bo snyder Guest

    I am getting very fusrtated with my scsi drives. I have tried a few
    different drives to install redhat 6.2 on. I tried 3 different 9 gig
    dirves and an 18 gig drive. All these drives are put in an external
    scsi case with a standard 50 pin to lvd 68 pin connector adapdter. I
    do not have any other SCA drives so I am forced to use the external
    drive case.

    Every time i get to the part about formattng the drive (with redhat
    6.2, its the only OS that I have at this point), it won't allow me to
    make the main partition greater than 1 gig which drives me nuts
    because I really just want to have a 8 or 17 gig main drive and an
    additonal swap partition. If i make the first partition a 1 gig
    partition, then the rest of the .

    Any ideas? I did try the trick of jumpering the drive so that it is
    S/E enabled but it still isn't working properly.

    Also is there a method to formatting the drive without resorting to
    having to have an offical solaris cd?
     
    bo snyder, Nov 23, 2003
    #6
  7. To verify, this is an SS5, right?

    IIRC (it's been a while) the boot PROMs in these beasts can only boot
    from a file contained within the first 2GB of your boot disk. With this
    in mind, you don't want a multi-GB boot partition. Have you tried the
    usual i386 Linux trick of creating a 100MB /boot partition at the start
    of the disk which just contains the kernel image and any necessary initrd?

    This could solve your issue, assuming that your tools allow you to
    create a large / partition offset into the disk.

    Cheers,
    Ross.
     
    Ross A. Hamilton, Nov 23, 2003
    #7
  8. It's interesting. I've got SS5 on my desk and probe-scsi-all says:
    Target 1
    Unit 0 Disk Seagate SUN2.1G -- my 2nd disk

    Target 1
    Unit 3 Disk Conner CP053548 -- my boot drive

    Of course both drives are internal and SCA.
    Thus If only SCSI ID == Target # (Which I suppose is true)then
    2nd drive is not 0, but 1.


    All the best,
    Mike
     
    Michal Przyluski, Nov 23, 2003
    #8
  9. Oh Gosh, what a mistake!!! Sorry
    IS:
    SHOULD BE:

    Target 1
    Unit 0 Seagate

    Target 3
    Unit 0 Conner

    Sorry again,
    Mike
     
    Michal Przyluski, Nov 23, 2003
    #9
  10. bo snyder

    Claus Dragon Guest

    While forming in a straight line, Chris Newport
    why the boot drive has the number 3 instead of 0 or even 1 will be
    forever beyond my understanding.
     
    Claus Dragon, Nov 24, 2003
    #10
  11. I explained in an earlier article in this thread.

    | Boot from SCSI ID 3 was introduced
    | with the first Sun4c systems (SPARCstation 1) as Sun assumed that
    | buyers of these systems wanted to continue to use their external disk
    | drives (sun3 desktop systems like the Sun 3/50 didn't have internal
    | disks) from their sun3 systems. The external disk drives used with sun3
    | systems required that it be opened to change the SCSI ID, so Sun
    | thought that making the internal disk of the Sun4c systems be SCSI ID 3
    | would make it easier for their customers.
     
    Goran Larsson, Nov 24, 2003
    #11
  12. Someone else explained this a few days ago.
    Basically the Sparc 1 (?) was the first Sun box to have an internal
    drive. Sun realised that people would want to keep the external
    drives that they had from previous models, but these needed
    disassembly to change the SCSI ID. Sun therefore chose the least
    used ID 3 for the internal drive, and this persisted until the
    Ultra range was released and sanity was restored.
    IOW, it seemed like a good idea at the time.
     
    Chris Newport, Nov 24, 2003
    #12
  13. bo snyder

    Claus Dragon Guest

    While forming in a straight line, (Goran Larsson)
    wrote:

    aaah, okay.

    so basically, they used that system because it was introduced earlier,
    especially for external disks.

    thanks for pointing that out :)
     
    Claus Dragon, Nov 25, 2003
    #13
  14. No. The earlier systems (sun3) did boot from SCSI ID 0, but as sun3
    desktop systems did not have internal disks they booted from a disk
    in an external box.

    The new desktop systems (sun4c) did boot from the least used SCSI ID,
    3, an internal disk. This was done to make it possible for the
    customer to re-use the external disks from their old system without
    having to open up the boxes and moving SCSI ID straps. Remember, disks
    were not cheap at that time so the customer was probably going to
    keep his old disks.
     
    Goran Larsson, Nov 25, 2003
    #14
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