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HDD Password I never set is requested for Toshiba Satellite laptop - please help

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by nycg10014, Apr 7, 2007.

  1. nycg10014

    nycg10014 Guest

    Hi-

    I recently turned on my Toshiba Satellite 1405-S151 laptop after
    several weeks not using it and, after starting with the Toshiba logo &
    icons, it came to a blank page with "HDD Password =" and a flashing
    cursor.

    I have never set an HDD Password on my computer, and this hasn't
    happened before. Tried typing in a few passwords I've used for other
    things, but after three tries the computer just shuts off.

    I need to get the computer to work, or at least retrieve my data. Can
    anyone help or offer ideas? Heard there was a class action lawsuit
    against Toshiba for the same issue with Satellites, but that was the
    6100 series. Anyone else had this problem with Toshibas in my laptop
    series?

    (If there's a Toshiba group I'm unaware of, please direct me there)

    Big thanks,
    J
     
    nycg10014, Apr 7, 2007
    #1
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  2. nycg10014

    pen Guest

    I did find a Toshiba group *Japan.comp.Toshiba*
    It is in English, but doesn't seem to be terribly active,
    but it's worth a try. Otherwise try some of the computer
    hardware groups.
     
    pen, Apr 7, 2007
    #2
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  3. You are likely screwed. In most cases, there is no reasonable way to
    recover a hard drive that [thinks it] has a password set.
     
    Barry Watzman, Apr 7, 2007
    #3
  4. nycg10014

    tc Guest

    More than likely the hard drive is dead and this is the indication the
    system gives.
    Terry

     
    tc, Apr 7, 2007
    #4
  5. nycg10014

    mike Guest

    Is it possible that someone else set the password?
    That's one of the risks of not setting passwords.

    I once took a computer to a swapmeet. Some NICE person set a bios
    password that locked up the system. Luckily, it was an old system
    that could be reset by removing the battery. People do bad things
    just for fun...sigh...
    You didn't piss off one of your kids lately did you?
    mike
     
    mike, Apr 7, 2007
    #5
  6. nycg10014

    nycg10014 Guest

    No - it hasn't been out of my posession since a few weeks ago when it
    was working fine, unless someone could've put in a "timed" password
    shutdown, but I don't even know if that's possible. My main worry is
    getting data off it without it costing a fortune - wonder if anyone
    else had the same problem. Thanks for all the replies - please keep
    em coming.
     
    nycg10014, Apr 8, 2007
    #6
  7. nycg10014

    Peabody Guest

    says...
    This is a bit scary.

    Looking on Google, I found this service that specifically
    mentions password removal (for money of course). You may
    want to talk to them:

    http://www.nortek.on.ca/default.aspx

    Also, I certainly would talk to Toshiba about it. Unlikely
    to be helpful, but you never know.

    This is the official Toshiba laptop forum, but you have to
    register with AOL to post, and I haven't found it to be
    particularly helpful on most things:

    http://community.compuserve.com/n/pfx/forum.aspx?webtag=ws-laptop

    Please let us know if you find a solution.
     
    Peabody, Apr 8, 2007
    #7
  8. nycg10014

    Peabody Guest

    Also, I think it's possible that this has something to do with the
    computer not being used for several weeks. My Toshiba L35 uses an
    internal rechargeable battery for the cmos and clock instead of the
    traditional coin battery that lasts for years.

    The rechargeable is recharged only when the computer is On, not when
    it's Off (even if the main battery is still in place).

    So maybe the drive password was there all the time, and stored in
    cmos, then it was lost when the cmos/clock battery ran down. If
    that's what happened, maybe Toshiba could tell you what it is.

    Well, it's just a guess, but I think you definitely should talk to
    Toshiba.
     
    Peabody, Apr 8, 2007
    #8
  9. The passwords are saved in flash memory that does not require battery
    backup.
     
    Barry Watzman, Apr 8, 2007
    #9
  10. nycg10014

    Ron Guest

    It should be a simple matter to retrieve your data .... all you need
    to do is to .....
    carefully remove the laptop hdd .....
    use an "ide-to-laptop hdd" adapter an connect this to the secondary
    ide ribbon cable of any desktop computer having a similar OS.....
    on restarting the computer, go into bios setup and ensure that
    the laptop hdd is mounted.....
    when you boot into the os, your toshiba drive partitions will
    be accessible and you can copy (cut, paste, delete) your
    important data files to any other medium of your choice.
     
    Ron, Apr 9, 2007
    #10
  11. Ron,

    No, wrong.

    HARD DRIVE passwords are EXTREMELY secure. They are implemented
    entirely within the hard drive, and the guiding principle is that the
    drive's data shall NEVER be accessed without the correct password. The
    password is recorded both on the drive platters and in flash memory on
    the PCB, and they have to match or the drive is non-functional. NOTHING
    will allow access ... not using an IDE or USB adapter in another
    computer, and not changing the drive circuit card. This feature was
    implemented to allow government and corporations to have data security
    if a laptop was stolen, and it is EXTREMELY difficult (all but
    impossible) to bypass.
     
    Barry Watzman, Apr 9, 2007
    #11
  12. nycg10014

    Ron Guest

    Ok Barry! ...... thanks for the info.... :)

    The original poster may wish to ask around here .....
    http://forum.notebookreview.com

    /Ron
     
    Ron, Apr 10, 2007
    #12
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