HDTV-- I don't really need this-- do I

Discussion in 'Dell' started by MZB, Jun 12, 2011.

  1. MZB

    MZB Guest

    Well, I've posted about my HDTV adventure and you guys have been very
    helpful (I've ordered my cables). Well, today, the TV that we intend to
    buy dropped in price (Father's Day Special, 2 days only) so we got
    ordered our 50" Panasonic Plasma today (about $850 with free delivery).

    But they sure push hard trying to sell us an extended warranty (forget
    it) and some kind of service deal. They keep saying if a pixel goes out
    they would come and fix the TV or replace it. Apparently without that
    even though there is a warranty it would be a problem.

    So, what are the chances that a pixel would go and would something like
    that be noticeable? Also:

    They really push hard to sell some kind of 3-hour in-house calibration
    of the TV. This is some electronic thing that supposedly perfects the TV
    settings. They want $300. for it. What a racket. I said no because it
    seems like a big moneymaker for them. Also, I can't see spending $300
    for this (the set cost $850.). But, again, I know nothing about this.

    I trust you folks, not Best Buy. Does anyone know anything about this
    so-called calibration?

    Mel
     
    MZB, Jun 12, 2011
    #1
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  2. MZB

    MZB Guest

    Upon more reading about calibration, it sounds like it might be
    something worthwhile... or not? I'm confused.

    Mel
     
    MZB, Jun 12, 2011
    #2
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  3. MZB

    Steve W. Guest

    On a plasma it is VERY likely. I won't even look at a plasma unit
    because of the high failure rates. I have seen a LOT of plasma units
    junked because of screen failure and the repairs were more than a new unit.

    The calibration is mainly where they come in. connect the set to all
    your signal sources and set it up to each one so you get the best
    picture possible.
    For instance in my area there are a number of HD stations BUT they don't
    broadcast everything in HD. There is also one station that carries a lot
    of the old TV shows. When they come on the HD makes them really look
    bad. BUT you can usually adjust the set to different display options to
    make it look better.
    Then if you have a standard DVD you will need to play with that as well.

    It is basically a judgment call. If you don't mind reading and
    experimenting with the settings and adjusting yourself then DIY, if you
    don't want to bother then pay them the money.
     
    Steve W., Jun 13, 2011
    #3
  4. MZB

    Bob Villa Guest

    If someone told me it was $50 I wouldn't go for it. Don't be
    hoodwinked because they discount and then try to bait you on extras.
    As far as pixels, I don't think you can lose them with a plasma (only
    LCD) AFAIK. Another BB trick?
     
    Bob Villa, Jun 13, 2011
    #4
  5. MZB

    Bob Villa Guest

    Bob Villa, Jun 13, 2011
    #5
  6. MZB

    powrwrap Guest


    See this article.

    http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/30269644.html
     
    powrwrap, Jun 15, 2011
    #6
  7. "powrwrap" provided the link:
    The sets are usually set up to look good in the store
    which has "showcase lighting", i.e. relatively bright - not
    the same as your living room. So the brightness, the color
    saturation, and the contrast are usually turned up to
    produce a stunning picture. Just turn those controls down
    to produce a realistic looking scene, as opposed to an
    eye-popping scene, and both you and the set will be
    happier. And, as the article mentions, there are "secret"
    menus available, and I'd make it a Condition of Sale
    that those menus are explained to you or that the spec
    sheet describing them are provided to you. After all,
    you will be the owner, not the leaser, of the TV set,
    and you are due all information needed for getting
    maximum enjoyment out of the product.

    *TimDaniels*
     
    Timothy Daniels, Jun 15, 2011
    #7
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