Holy Moly -- Residual Electricity????

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Prisoner at War, Nov 5, 2007.

  1. Is there some such concept as "residual electricity"???

    There was a problem with a computer at work...it's a new Dell running
    WinXP Pro...everything's fine, I go to lunch and come back to a blank
    screen that won't wake up from power-save/sleep mode!! I do the
    obvious and check connections, making sure they're secure and
    whatnot. I turn off the computer and turn it back on a few times, to
    no effect!

    Tech Support suspects some kind of a "power management" issue --
    whatever that is -- and suggests that I leave the system off for a few
    minutes, literally, to let things "clear"...whatever that means. Sure
    enough, however: it works!

    So now I'm here asking, because Tech hasn't the time to puzzle over it
    with me, WHAT HAPPENED??? And how come shutting off power for a few
    seconds isn't comparable to leaving power off for a few
    minutes????????????

    TIA!
     
    Prisoner at War, Nov 5, 2007
    #1
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  2. Prisoner at War

    jimp Guest

    Capacitors.
     
    jimp, Nov 5, 2007
    #2
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  3. Prisoner at War

    Gordon Guest


    capacitors usually discharge when the current is switched off - their main
    job is to smooth current, not to store volts....
     
    Gordon, Nov 5, 2007
    #3
  4. Prisoner at War

    Unknown Guest

    When you turn it off and leave it off for a few minutes, it allows the
    capacitors in the power supply to discharge.
    With the power supply caps discharged, you in effect are guaranteeing a good
    power on reset when you power on.
     
    Unknown, Nov 5, 2007
    #4
  5. They discharge, but it can take some time depending on the capacitors.
    A few minutes is not at all unusual.
     
    Jupiter Jones, Nov 5, 2007
    #5
  6. Prisoner at War

    RnR Guest


    That is my understanding too of capacitors in general !!
     
    RnR, Nov 5, 2007
    #6
  7. Prisoner at War

    Lem Guest

    True, but they don't discharge instantaneously. Ever hear about the
    "time constant" of an R-C circuit?

    T = R × C
    where:
    T = time constant in seconds
    R = resistance in ohms
    C = capacitance in farads

    The time constant is the time taken for the charging (or discharging)
    current (I) to fall to 1/e of its initial value (Io).

    After each time constant the current falls by 1/e (about 1/3). After 5
    time constants (5RC) the current has fallen to less than 1% of its
    initial value and we can reasonably say that the capacitor is fully
    (dis)charged, but in fact the capacitor takes for ever to (dis)charge
    fully!

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 4KB of RAM and 72KB of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
     
    Lem, Nov 5, 2007
    #7
  8. Prisoner at War

    Tom Lake Guest

    You can get some nasty burns from a TV that's unplugged due to those
    things!

    Tom Lake
     
    Tom Lake, Nov 5, 2007
    #8
  9. Prisoner at War

    Androcles Guest

    : : >
    : > Capacitors.
    : >
    :
    :
    : capacitors usually discharge when the current is switched off - their main
    : job is to smooth current, not to store volts....

    That shows how much you know -- which is zilch.
     
    Androcles, Nov 5, 2007
    #9
  10. Prisoner at War

    Gordon Guest


    Well rooty toot to you.
     
    Gordon, Nov 5, 2007
    #10
  11. Prisoner at War

    RnR Guest

    Almost sounds like you speak from experience <grin>. I've unplugged
    tv's but never had any ill effects from it luckily. Of course I don't
    open it up either.
     
    RnR, Nov 5, 2007
    #11
  12. Prisoner at War

    Androcles Guest

    : : >
    : > : > : : > : >
    : > : > Capacitors.
    : > : >
    : > :
    : > :
    : > : capacitors usually discharge when the current is switched off - their
    : > main
    : > : job is to smooth current, not to store volts....
    : >
    : > That shows how much you know -- which is zilch.
    : >
    : >
    :
    :
    : Well rooty toot to you.

    That shows just how childish you are.
     
    Androcles, Nov 5, 2007
    #12
  13. Prisoner at War

    Gordon Guest

    Sod you you arrogant ignorant moron.
    Capacitors ARE used to smooth current so just crawl back under your slimy
    rock...
     
    Gordon, Nov 5, 2007
    #13
  14. Prisoner at War

    Androcles Guest

    : : >
    : > : > : : > : >
    : > : > : > : > : : > : > : >
    : > : > : > Capacitors.
    : > : > : >
    : > : > :
    : > : > :
    : > : > : capacitors usually discharge when the current is switched off -
    : > their
    : > : > main
    : > : > : job is to smooth current, not to store volts....
    : > : >
    : > : > That shows how much you know -- which is zilch.
    : > : >
    : > : >
    : > :
    : > :
    : > : Well rooty toot to you.
    : >
    : > That shows just how childish you are.
    : >
    : >
    :
    : Sod you you arrogant ignorant moron.
    : Capacitors ARE used to smooth current so just crawl back under your slimy
    : rock...

    That shows just how stupid you really are, you don't even know
    the difference between voltage and current.
    HAHAHA!
     
    Androcles, Nov 5, 2007
    #14
  15. Prisoner at War

    RnR Guest

    Yes Capacitors which take a while to discharge.
     
    RnR, Nov 5, 2007
    #15
  16. Yes,To the moon and back with 4KB of RAM and 72KB of ROM.
    So why can't some one harness nuclear fusion for our energy needs?
     
    Gerald Newton, Nov 5, 2007
    #16
  17. Prisoner at War

    HeyBub Guest

    You're going to get a lot of theory here, but the real answer is: The power
    supply's broke.
     
    HeyBub, Nov 5, 2007
    #17
  18. Prisoner at War

    Androcles Guest

    Yes,To the moon and back with 4KB of RAM and 72KB of ROM.
    So why can't some one harness nuclear fusion for our energy needs?

    1) Don't need to, your energy needs are really your energy wants.
    Mankind can survive without the inefficient use of energy and has
    done for millions of years, as do all other species on this planet.
    There is a huge difference between need and want.

    2) The equations are wrong, the fools are fiddling with Einstein's
    relativity and it doesn't work.

    So why can't *you* harness nuclear fusion for *my* energy wants?
     
    Androcles, Nov 5, 2007
    #18
  19. Prisoner at War

    Unknown Guest

    No it's not!
     
    Unknown, Nov 5, 2007
    #19
  20. Prisoner at War

    Tony Harding Guest

    But it's not instantaneous, which can be seen easily by turning off your
    computer, unplugging it from the wall/USP and pressing the computer's ON
    switch. What you're doing is bleeding off the charge left behind by the
    Instant On feature (keeps the mobo hot). This bleeds off pretty quickly
    on its own.

    IIRC I've seen big warning stickers on TVs/monitors warning of 1,000 of
    volts if you go poking inside.

    http://icrontic.com/forum/showthread.php?p=241556
     
    Tony Harding, Nov 5, 2007
    #20
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