Holy Moly -- Residual Electricity????

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Prisoner at War, Nov 5, 2007.

  1. Prisoner at War

    Leythos Guest

    The issue is with a cheap motherboard that doesn't properly recover from
    Power Management settings.

    Yes, capacitors have to be drained down over a couple minutes in some
    cases, but they are not the symptom of the real problem - the real
    problem is a crappy APM or motherboard.

    --

    Leythos
    - Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
    - Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling a
    drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
    (remove 999 for proper email address)
     
    Leythos, Nov 5, 2007
    #21
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  2. Prisoner at War

    Unknown Guest

    Another spoof!
     
    Unknown, Nov 5, 2007
    #22
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  3. Prisoner at War

    John Guest

    What utter crap.

    John.
     
    John, Nov 6, 2007
    #23
  4. Prisoner at War

    Androcles Guest

    : Gordon wrote:
    : > : >> Capacitors.
    : >>
    : >
    : >
    : > capacitors usually discharge when the current is switched off - their
    main
    : > job is to smooth current, not to store volts....
    : >
    : >
    :
    : What utter crap.
    :
    : John.

    Not only is it utter crap, the arrogant little prick gets bent out of
    shape when you call him on it.
     
    Androcles, Nov 6, 2007
    #24
  5. Prisoner at War

    Tom Lake Guest

    Yes, I have indeed supped at Zeus' table and tasted
    his electronic wrath! 8^)

    Tom "Black Hand" Lake
     
    Tom Lake, Nov 6, 2007
    #25
  6. It was just before the end of the tech support guys shift and he wanted
    enough time to escape from your call back if it didn't work!
    It was just before the end of the tech support guys shift and he wanted
    enough time to escape from your call back if it didn't work!

    --
    Joe Leikhim K4SAT
    "The RFI-EMI-GUY"©

    "Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
    For if it prosper, none dare call it treason."

    "Follow The Money" ;-P
     
    **THE-RFI-EMI-GUY**, Nov 6, 2007
    #26
  7. Prisoner at War

    Steve W. Guest

    Ever charged up a nice sized unit and tossed it to a "friend"....
    How about plugging one into AC and seeing how bright a flash you can make?

    The fun of electronics education....

    --
    Steve W.
    Near Cooperstown, New York
    NRA Member
    Pacifism - The theory that if they'd fed
    Jeffrey Dahmer enough human flesh,
    he'd have become a vegan.
     
    Steve W., Nov 6, 2007
    #27
  8. Prisoner at War

    Leythos Guest

    Not at all, if the system won't come out of suspend properly, since it's
    not a Windows issue, it's almost always the result of bad quality of the
    motherboard / BIOS. Seen it hundreds of times, and that's one reason to
    not buy cheap crap.

    --

    Leythos
    - Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
    - Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling a
    drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
    (remove 999 for proper email address)
     
    Leythos, Nov 6, 2007
    #28
  9. Prisoner at War

    nottoooily Guest

    He's right. In a computer that's what they're for. Sure they can still
    store charge without any current flowing, but that's not their
    intended purpose. Many of them will automatically discharge straight
    away into the heavy loads they're connected to. But in the power
    supply are capacitors which do retain their charge after switching
    off.

    Not sure what this has to do with stopping the computer from working,
    clearly there's an actual problem that should be fixed to prevent it
    happening again.
     
    nottoooily, Nov 6, 2007
    #29
  10. Prisoner at War

    Unknown Guest

    No he's not. Capacitors do NOT smooth current. They reduce or eliminate
    voltage fluctuations.
     
    Unknown, Nov 6, 2007
    #30
  11. Prisoner at War

    Unknown Guest

    Where have you seen it hundreds of times? Give facts not emotions.
     
    Unknown, Nov 6, 2007
    #31
  12. Prisoner at War

    Tim Slattery Guest

    A power supply in any electronic gizmo changes 110V (usually) AC to
    one or more voltages of DC, generally something like 5V - 20V, I
    think.

    Anyway, the voltage changing is done by a transformer. The
    lower-voltage AC from the secondary coil of the transformer is then
    fed to one (or sometimes more) rectifiers. That's a circuit component
    that allows current to flow in only one direction. Now you have DC,
    but very lumpy DC: it oscillates between no current at all and the
    required voltage. Not much equipment can use the juice in that state.
    So it needs to be "smoothed" (that is the term that's used). That is
    accomplished by putting a capacitor - usually a pretty large
    electrolytic capacitor - across the line. The capacitor stores charge
    when the voltage goes up and releases it as the voltage drops, thereby
    smoothing out the peaks and valleys.
     
    Tim Slattery, Nov 6, 2007
    #32
  13. Prisoner at War

    Androcles Guest

    Even more amusing is dynamic RAM that uses the charge on
    a capacitor to store bits.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_random_access_memory



    : No he's not. Capacitors do NOT smooth current. They reduce or eliminate
    : voltage fluctuations.






    : : >>
    : >> in message
    : >>
    : >> :: >> : >
    : >> : > Capacitors.
    : >> : >
    : >> :
    : >> :
    : >> : capacitors usually discharge when the current is switched off - their
    : >> main
    : >> : job is to smooth current, not to store volts....
    : >>
    : >> That shows how much you know -- which is zilch.
    : >
    : > He's right. In a computer that's what they're for. Sure they can still
    : > store charge without any current flowing, but that's not their
    : > intended purpose. Many of them will automatically discharge straight
    : > away into the heavy loads they're connected to. But in the power
    : > supply are capacitors which do retain their charge after switching
    : > off.
    : >
    : > Not sure what this has to do with stopping the computer from working,
    : > clearly there's an actual problem that should be fixed to prevent it
    : > happening again.
    : >
    : >
    :
    :
     
    Androcles, Nov 6, 2007
    #33
  14. Prisoner at War

    Androcles Guest

    :
    : >No he's not. Capacitors do NOT smooth current. They reduce or eliminate
    : >voltage fluctuations.
    :
    : A power supply in any electronic gizmo changes 110V (usually) AC to
    : one or more voltages of DC, generally something like 5V - 20V, I
    : think.
    :
    : Anyway, the voltage changing is done by a [snip transformer]
    switching regulator.
    http://www.national.com/appinfo/power/files/f5.pdf
     
    Androcles, Nov 6, 2007
    #34
  15. Prisoner at War

    RnR Guest

    what is the difference? I seem to recall the formula V=IR so isn't
    it really the same thing or very close to the same thing??
     
    RnR, Nov 6, 2007
    #35
  16. Prisoner at War

    Bob I Guest

    Humm, pretty much ALL of our current energy use comes originally from
    "nuclear fusion".
     
    Bob I, Nov 6, 2007
    #36
  17. Prisoner at War

    Androcles Guest

    :
    :
    : Androcles wrote:
    :
    : > : >
    : >>Gordon wrote:
    : >>
    : >>>: >>>
    : >>>>Capacitors.
    : >>
    : >>>capacitors usually discharge when the current is switched off - their
    : >>>main
    : >>>job is to smooth current, not to store volts....
    : >>
    : >>True, but they don't discharge instantaneously. Ever hear about the
    : >>"time constant" of an R-C circuit?
    : >>
    : >>T = R × C
    : >>where:
    : >>T = time constant in seconds
    : >>R = resistance in ohms
    : >>C = capacitance in farads
    : >>
    : >>The time constant is the time taken for the charging (or discharging)
    : >>current (I) to fall to 1/e of its initial value (Io).
    : >>
    : >>After each time constant the current falls by 1/e (about 1/3). After 5
    : >>time constants (5RC) the current has fallen to less than 1% of its
    : >>initial value and we can reasonably say that the capacitor is fully
    : >>(dis)charged, but in fact the capacitor takes for ever to (dis)charge
    : >>fully!
    : >>
    : >>--
    : >>Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    : >>
    : >>To the moon and back with 4KB of RAM and 72KB of
    :: >
    : >
    : > Yes,To the moon and back with 4KB of RAM and 72KB of ROM.
    : > So why can't some one harness nuclear fusion for our energy needs?
    : >
    : > 1) Don't need to, your energy needs are really your energy wants.
    : > Mankind can survive without the inefficient use of energy and has
    : > done for millions of years, as do all other species on this planet.
    : > There is a huge difference between need and want.
    : >
    : > 2) The equations are wrong, the fools are fiddling with Einstein's
    : > relativity and it doesn't work.
    : >
    : > So why can't *you* harness nuclear fusion for *my* energy wants?
    : >
    :
    : Humm, pretty much ALL of our current energy use comes originally from
    : "nuclear fusion".
    Yep :)
     
    Androcles, Nov 6, 2007
    #37
  18. Prisoner at War

    JDa™© Guest

    There is a easier way. Power down, unplug the power cord, then press
    and hold down the ON button for a count of 8, then reconnect the power
    cord, and power up again.

    Pressing the On button assures that the capacitors are fully discharged.


    Unknown, did transcribed the following::
     
    JDa™©, Nov 6, 2007
    #38
  19. Prisoner at War

    HeyBub Guest


    Is too!
     
    HeyBub, Nov 6, 2007
    #39
  20. Prisoner at War

    Unknown Guest

    Power supply is fine!
     
    Unknown, Nov 6, 2007
    #40
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