Holy Moly -- Residual Electricity????

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Prisoner at War, Nov 5, 2007.

  1. Prisoner at War

    S.Lewis Guest


    You let the 'magic smoke' out of the box, dude. ;-)

    Never *ever* do that. heh
     
    S.Lewis, Nov 6, 2007
    #41
    1. Advertisements

  2. Prisoner at War

    Leythos Guest

    I've been working with/on computers for almost 30 years, PM has been a
    problem for at least 10 of those years.

    I'm stating facts, I don't state emotions.

    --

    Leythos
    - Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
    - Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling a
    drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
    (remove 999 for proper email address)
     
    Leythos, Nov 6, 2007
    #42
    1. Advertisements

  3. Prisoner at War

    Unknown Guest

    Spoof!
     
    Unknown, Nov 6, 2007
    #43
  4. Prisoner at War

    Stuart Guest

    In computers - yes, the PSU is always switch mode but that is not the case
    with all equipment.

    Particularly in sensitive equipment, where switchers would generate too
    much crap and interfere with equipment operation linears are still used.

    --
    Stuart Winsor

    From is valid but subject to change without notice if it gets spammed.

    For Barn dances and folk evenings in the Coventry and Warwickshire area
    See: http://www.barndance.org.uk
     
    Stuart, Nov 6, 2007
    #44
  5. Prisoner at War

    srp Guest

    I suppose you have some model of Dell flat screen with this computer ?

    If so, it may not be the computer at fault but the monitor.

    I ran into similar problem and also thought that the computer was
    bugged. Actually, the computer booted fine, but the monitor
    was at fault.

    If you haven't resolved it yet, here is how it was resolved for me.

    There was need to completely disconnect the flat screen
    power cord from the wall socket (easier there than at the
    flat screen end) and wait a while.

    The flat screen micro then rebooted correctly upon reconnection
    and repowering.

    My interpretation was that there is some builtin flash memory
    chip into the monitor circuit that keeps some settings that
    had become corrupt. The control pin of that chip no
    doubt remains powered even if you turn the monitor off
    without completely disconnecting the power cord.

    André MIchaud
     
    srp, Nov 6, 2007
    #45
  6. Prisoner at War

    Leythos Guest

    Is there a reason that you've taken to spouting crap instead of being
    able to disprove real world experience?

    PM has long been problematic on cheap/badly designed motherboards -
    prove me wrong instead of being a child/troll.

    --

    Leythos
    - Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
    - Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling a
    drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
    (remove 999 for proper email address)
     
    Leythos, Nov 6, 2007
    #46
  7. Prisoner at War

    Unknown Guest

    You're the one that made the ridiculous statement. Then you say that's your
    experience.
    My experience is opposite.
     
    Unknown, Nov 6, 2007
    #47
  8. Prisoner at War

    Leythos Guest

    And your experience doesn't invalidate what I've said.

    My experience does invalidate your experience as being the definitive
    answer. While you may not have the experience for what ever reason, I do
    and I've seen it happen on cheap/crappy motherboards and even good ones
    that had bad firmware, hundreds of times.

    You might learn something from those of us that have been around for a
    while if you could take your head out of your a$$.

    --

    Leythos
    - Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
    - Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling a
    drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
    (remove 999 for proper email address)
     
    Leythos, Nov 6, 2007
    #48
  9. Prisoner at War

    Unknown Guest

    More emotional nonsense. What was the name of the manufacturer of the
    boards? What computer manufacturer?
    You seen hundreds! What problem did they cause? What was the design
    deficiency? What was the technology that failed?
    Hundreds of times????? Give us the data.
     
    Unknown, Nov 6, 2007
    #49
  10. Prisoner at War

    Androcles Guest

    : In article <CK1Yi.233762$>,
    : > : Anyway, the voltage changing is done by a [snip transformer]
    : > switching regulator.
    : > http://www.national.com/appinfo/power/files/f5.pdf
    :
    : In computers - yes, the PSU is always switch mode but that is not the case
    : with all equipment.

    It's a computer we are talking about. We've had transformers
    and bridge diodes since the dark ages but some people have
    never evolved from their train set with its transformer, selenium
    rectifier and rheostat.
    http://www.theodoregray.com/PeriodicTable/Samples/034.10/s12s.JPG
    http://img.alibaba.com/photo/51631125/Sliding_Rheostat_Specification.jpg
    I was designing pulse width modulation controllers over 35 years ago,
    the triac is older than that.
     
    Androcles, Nov 6, 2007
    #50
  11. Prisoner at War

    Leythos Guest

    I don't see any reason to be trolled by you.

    --

    Leythos
    - Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
    - Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling a
    drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
    (remove 999 for proper email address)
     
    Leythos, Nov 7, 2007
    #51
  12. Prisoner at War

    nottoooily Guest

    Oh yes they do don't they :p In fact it's pretty much the opposite of
    smoothing current.

    Well that's true of bypass capacitors that're used near chips. But I
    think it's fair to say the input capacitors in a power supply do
    smooth current by removing mains voltage fluctuations, and thereby
    preventing current fluctuations in the downstream load. And in fact
    those are the ones that can hold their charge after switching off.
     
    nottoooily, Nov 7, 2007
    #52
  13. Prisoner at War

    RnR Guest

    I just love these type posts/replies !!
     
    RnR, Nov 7, 2007
    #53
  14. Prisoner at War

    krw Guest

    They don't "smooth" current at all. They "smooth" voltage by
    storing/supplying current. They don't prevent current fluctuations
    at all, indeed cause them in the attempt to maintain voltage.
    Voltage across a capacitor can't change instantaneously, but the
    current through one certainly can.
     
    krw, Nov 7, 2007
    #54
  15. Prisoner at War

    Stuart Guest

    May I just re-quote to you the text to which I replied?

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    : A power supply in any electronic gizmo changes 110V (usually) AC to
    : one or more voltages of DC, generally something like 5V - 20V, I
    : think.
    :
    : Anyway, the voltage changing is done by a [snip transformer]
    switching regulator.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    Please note the word "any" in the statement:

    "any electronic gizmo"

    as used by Tim Slattery

    Yes I've ben around long enough to know about Selenium rectifiers, Valve
    rectifiers and mercury Arc rectifiers too!

    Did you know Steel Tank mercury arc rectifiers used triggering to control
    the output voltage just like an SCR or Triac?

    ;-)

    --
    Stuart Winsor

    From is valid but subject to change without notice if it gets spammed.

    For Barn dances and folk evenings in the Coventry and Warwickshire area
    See: http://www.barndance.org.uk
     
    Stuart, Nov 7, 2007
    #55
  16. Prisoner at War

    Androcles Guest

    : In article <X07Yi.58352$>,
    : > It's a computer we are talking about.
    :
    : May I just re-quote to you the text to which I replied?

    No you may not, the record is plain enough.
    If you quote part then quote all.

    It's a computer we are talking about. We've had transformers
    and bridge diodes since the dark ages but some people have
    never evolved from their train set with its transformer, selenium
    rectifier and rheostat.
    http://www.theodoregray.com/PeriodicTable/Samples/034.10/s12s.JPG
    http://img.alibaba.com/photo/51631125/Sliding_Rheostat_Specification.jpg
    I was designing pulse width modulation controllers over 35 years ago,
    the triac is older than that.
     
    Androcles, Nov 7, 2007
    #56
  17. Prisoner at War

    Unknown Guest

    The current on the output of a supply can vary by a considerable amount by
    turning
    devices attached to it on or off. Capacitors do not smooth current.

    > wrote in message
     
    Unknown, Nov 7, 2007
    #57
  18. Prisoner at War

    Tony Harding Guest

    Thus the "arrogant" part of his moniker. :)
     
    Tony Harding, Nov 10, 2007
    #58
  19. Prisoner at War

    Androcles Guest

    : Androcles wrote:
    : > : > : Gordon wrote:
    : > : > : > : >> Capacitors.
    : > : >>
    : > : >
    : > : >
    : > : > capacitors usually discharge when the current is switched off -
    their
    : > main
    : > : > job is to smooth current, not to store volts....
    : > : >
    : > : >
    : > :
    : > : What utter crap.
    : > :
    : > : John.
    : >
    : > Not only is it utter crap, the arrogant little prick gets bent out of
    : > shape when you call him on it.
    :
    : Thus the "arrogant" part of his moniker. :)

    Yes... I have no objection to someone being arrogant when
    they know what they talking about, but all to often arrogance
    and ignorance go hand in glove.


    He who knows not and knows not that he knows not, he is a fool. Shun him.
    He who knows not and knows that he knows not, he is a student. Teach him.
    He who knows and knows not that he knows, he is a tool. Use him.
    He who knows and knows that he knows, he is a sage. Follow him.


    #define little_prick 1/sqrt[(arrogance^2)+(ignorance^2)]

    (Androcles's inverse Pythagorean law)
     
    Androcles, Nov 10, 2007
    #59

  20. How about copper rectifiers, and electrolytic rectifiers?


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
    Michael A. Terrell, Nov 10, 2007
    #60
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.