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how can I give my laptop battery just a little more life? 60 seconds?

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by mamadu, May 8, 2006.

  1. mamadu

    mamadu Guest

    Hi,

    I have a Quantex N30W laptop which originally came with a BAT30WL
    Lithium Ion battery rated at 11.1V, 4800mAh. This battery is now dead.
    It has nothing left in it, not even 3 seconds.

    I have read somewhere that there is a way to give such dead batteries
    some additional, if very limited, lifetime. I would very much like to
    use this battery as a UPS since wer have plenty of power outages were I
    live. Just enough time to power down, 60 seconds would be great.

    Could anyone please tell me how to do this?

    Many thanks & kinds regards,

    Mamadu

    PS: the new replacement battery I got is rated at 6600 mAh. How much
    more time would that give me over my old 4800mAh one? about 1/4th more?
     
    mamadu, May 8, 2006
    #1
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  2. mamadu

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    I would not recommend that you try. Lithium-ion batteries are extremely
    dangerous devices if they are abused. They are quite safe if used
    correctly. In any event, the supposed procedures apply to an over
    discharged battery - which yours isn't. Yours is just plain knackered.

    If you want a UPS, why not buy one. For a laptop, a suitable UPS can be had
    for as little as $30. That is vastly less than the damage a burning battery
    will cause.

    Make sure that you remove the battery when running from AC power.
    Nope. 37.5% more (or 3/8ths more).
     
    M.I.5¾, May 8, 2006
    #2
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  3. mamadu

    Roger Mills Guest

    In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
    What's the rationale behind this statement? Is it bad for the battery? My
    battery died after about 3 years of being connected to the mains - and I
    very infrequently actually ran off batteries. Is this what killed it?

    In the OP's case, he *has* to have the battery installed when running off
    the mains so that it can automatically take over when the mains fails
    (unless he buys a separate UPS).
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ______
    Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
    monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
    PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!
     
    Roger Mills, May 8, 2006
    #3
  4. mamadu

    Notan Guest

    Heat... A battery's worst enemy.

    By leaving the battery constantly connected, while on AC, you're exposing
    the battery to unnecessary heat, thereby shortening its life.

    Notan
     
    Notan, May 8, 2006
    #4
  5. mamadu

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    If this group had an FAQ, this would be in it.

    There is no official rationale as such. On the surface there is no reason
    why a battery should have a short life when used in this manner. Anecdotal
    evidence suggests otherwise.

    Many speculate that the battery is overcharged, but this is clearly not the
    case. A very large fireball betrays an overcharged battery. No, the
    problem is that the battery is often located near heat producing components
    (of which there are many). Lithium-ion batteries hate even moderate amounts
    of heat. In fact they even prefer to be stored in a refrigerator (but not a
    freezer) rather than kept at room temperature. Laptop designs vary as to how
    much heat the battery is subject to, hence the wide range of claims as to
    how long the battery lasts before expiring.

    3 years is actually quite good. There are laptop designs where the battery
    is not near any heat producing parts at all and they don't seem to have any
    problems, others get quite warm and expire in under a year. The oldest
    Lithium-ion battery that I possess is 12 years old, has never been heated,
    and still has more or less it's full capacity. I have another that is 10
    years old and although it never indicates more than 80% charged, still seems
    to deliver more or less, its original capacity.
     
    M.I.5¾, May 8, 2006
    #5
  6. mamadu

    mamadu Guest

    "If you want a UPS, why not buy one. For a laptop, a suitable UPS can
    be had
    for as little as $30"

    You know of a UPS which is portable and costs about 30$?

    Could you please post a link?

    Thanks,

    M/
     
    mamadu, May 9, 2006
    #6
  7. mamadu

    Paul Rubin Guest

    Paul Rubin, May 9, 2006
    #7
  8. $30 is easy. No, it won't be portable. But the issue is for people who
    use their laptops as desktops, plugged in all the time from a single
    location.
     
    Barry Watzman, May 9, 2006
    #8
  9. When a laptop is really being used as a desktop, plugged in alll the
    time from a single location, just get a normal UPS ... something like an
    APC 350VA unit ... and plug the laptop's AC adapter into that, and
    remove the battery.
     
    Barry Watzman, May 9, 2006
    #9
  10. When a laptop is really being used as a desktop, plugged in alll the
    time from a single location, just get a normal UPS ... something like an
    APC 350VA unit ... and plug the laptop's AC adapter into that, and
    remove the battery.
     
    Barry Watzman, May 9, 2006
    #10
  11. mamadu

    mamadu Guest

    thanks for the very interesting info. although all this is new to me,
    it seems to be that that BC 350VA UPS (350VA / 180 watt power handling
    ability supports entry-level PCs for up to 15 minutes during power
    failures. $100,000 connected equipment Insurance) is better than the
    APC BE 350U (350VA/200W power capacity. Backup time: 8.1 minutes (half
    load), 1.6 minutes (full load). lifetime $50,000 equipment protection
    policy) while being cheaper too. Am I missing something?!
     
    mamadu, May 9, 2006
    #11
  12. mamadu

    flux Guest

    I have another that is 10
    Any idea why as a battery ages its fully-charged percentage decreases?
    My vaio is only 9 months old and the battery has shrunk to 97-98% -- a
    bad omen in my mind, as this hasn't happened in my other laptops nearly
    so quickly. The heat answer seems a reasonable explanation as to why
    the battery dies early, since this laptop seems to have some sort of a
    fission-powered thermal battery. I can't even touch the bottom more
    than a few seconds.

    flx
     
    flux, May 9, 2006
    #12
  13. mamadu

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    That sounds like a totally crap design feature to me.

    Hang on though. Isn't Vaio made by ... SONY - explained!

    And as SONY actually make Lithium-ion batteries, you would think that they
    know better.
     
    M.I.5¾, May 10, 2006
    #13
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