How hot is too hot?

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Robert McMillan, Oct 7, 2005.

  1. I have an I8600 and recently the weather has been getting hotter and so has
    my system. I was wondering how hot should it be allowed to run. I tried
    FANGUI, found here http://www.diefer.de/i8kfan/index.html as another user
    suggested in a different post and it returned that CPU = 55C, GPU = 53C and
    HDD = 52C.
    Is this too hot? Thanks in advance for any replies.

    Robert
     
    Robert McMillan, Oct 7, 2005
    #1
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  2. Yeah, those home multimedia full-power desktop replacement 'laptops'
    get pretty warm, but that's a bit too warm for my comfort level,
    especially the hard disk. 50C is "too hot to touch", try sitting it
    up on blocks to see if it'll cool off. Also, look into the cooling
    holes,slots,covers and see if there's any dust or lint plugging them
    up.
     
    William P. N. Smith, Oct 7, 2005
    #2
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  3. Robert McMillan

    Tom Scales Guest

    That does seem hot. I just installed it on my Inspiron 9300 for a
    comparison. The 9300 is a pretty complete multimedia machine with a 17"
    display. It's running on my lap (where it always runs).

    According to i8KFanGui, the CPU temp is 34 degrees. The hard drive temp is
    37 degrees.

    Pretty good.

    Tom
     
    Tom Scales, Oct 7, 2005
    #3
  4. Robert McMillan

    S.Lewis Guest

    You might check the cooling vents, heatsink and fan(s) for accumulated dust.
    A can of (electronics) compressed air can be used to remove most all of this
    (better if you can partially disassembly the laptop to fully clear the dust
    as opposed to blowing it further back into the chassis.).

    Technically, it's not running "too hot" or it would shut down from the
    overheat.


    Stew
     
    S.Lewis, Oct 7, 2005
    #4
  5. Robert McMillan

    Guest Guest

    Tom> That does seem hot. I just installed it on my Inspiron 9300 for a
    Tom> comparison. The 9300 is a pretty complete multimedia machine with a 17"
    Tom> display. It's running on my lap (where it always runs).

    Tom> According to i8KFanGui, the CPU temp is 34 degrees. The hard drive temp is
    Tom> 37 degrees.

    Tom> Pretty good.

    I thought Dells did not have the temp sensors. Did
    that change?

    ah
     
    Guest, Oct 7, 2005
    #5
  6. Robert McMillan

    S.Lewis Guest


    The Intel hardware within the CPU die as well as on the system boards do
    have temp diodes - they're just not "open" or made accessible/readily
    viewable to the end-user like many retail Intel-based boards are.

    Tom and the OP are accessing the temps via the software utility i8KFanGui,
    which an individual created some years back for the Inspiron 8000.

    hth

    Stew
     
    S.Lewis, Oct 7, 2005
    #6
  7. Side comment on this and other heat related issues.

    1. If you have pets take extra care as PCS in general and laptops in
    particular are particularly vulnerable to pet hair and dander. Many pets
    have oily coats as part of their protections from the natiral environment.
    As such the hair traps dust and lint as it acumulates more than human hair.

    2. Smoking deposits tar and nicotine on any surface exposed to smoke.
    Computers using cooling fans automatically suck in outside air (and smoke)
    and act as an ad hoc filter with the tar and nicotine getting deposited on
    it's internals. Tar deposits are tacky and as such dirt and dust sticks to
    it quite well. making it doubly hard to clean off.

    KC
     
    Kevin Childers, Oct 7, 2005
    #7
  8. Robert McMillan

    Tom Scales Guest

    Dimensions don't. Some Optiplex, Latitude and Inspirons do.
     
    Tom Scales, Oct 7, 2005
    #8
  9. Robert McMillan

    User N Guest

    But what are your (pl) configs, ambient temps, and loads? The 9300 temps
    appear consistent with idle/light load at moderate ambient. I expect you could
    run those up quite a bit if you tried. The OP's temps are up there, but under or
    after the right load in a hot room I don't think they'd be bad.
     
    User N, Oct 8, 2005
    #9
  10. Robert McMillan

    Tom Scales Guest


    Oh, I'm sure I could. That's definately a light load in a nicely air
    conditioned room.

    Tom
     
    Tom Scales, Oct 8, 2005
    #10
  11. Out of curiousity what is the ambient temperature where you are. It is
    currenlty reaching around 35C over here so expected mine to be hotter than
    that but i wasnt sure how much. Mine is a good 15C over the temperature of
    the room (I dont currently have airconditioning) and was wondering how this
    compared. I am going to get myself some compressed air when i am out at the
    shops later and see if giving it a clean helps at all. Thanks for everyones
    comments so far.

    Robert
     
    Robert McMillan, Oct 8, 2005
    #11
  12. Robert McMillan

    User N Guest

    Did you ever run some tests to see how high they would go?
     
    User N, Oct 8, 2005
    #12
  13. Robert McMillan

    Tom Scales Guest

    In the room, roughly 12C.


     
    Tom Scales, Oct 8, 2005
    #13
  14. Robert McMillan

    Tom Scales Guest

    Just did.

    Pretty high.

    Started running [email protected] and maxed the CPU for the last 10 hours. Running
    at 67C now. Interestingly, sit not really hot on my lap.

    Tom
     
    Tom Scales, Oct 8, 2005
    #14
  15. I wasnt doing anything particularly intensive on the computer. Merely
    internet and word processing. It was a warm day however and i was wondering
    if the computer was too hot. I have yet to get some compressed air and try
    blowing it into the vents but i am wondering how far i would need to
    disassemble such that i would not be simply blowing dust further into the
    laptop. Does this void my warranty at all? Thanks for everyones comments so
    far.

    Robert
     
    Robert McMillan, Oct 10, 2005
    #15
  16. Robert McMillan

    User N Guest

    Studying the system docs, particularly the service manual, would give
    you some sense I would think.

    http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/ins8500/en/en.htm

    FWIW, I'd leave the microprocessor thermal cooling assembly in place
    so as to not disturb the thermal junction between it and the CPU. I can't
    tell what's up with the so called video card. What they point to as being
    the video card looks like a heatsink that contacts a MB mounted GPU.
    If so, there would be another thermal junction I'd not disturb.
    I would expect the answer to be "no, assuming you don't damage anything".
     
    User N, Oct 10, 2005
    #16
  17. Thanks for this information. I have been browsing through the Dell websites
    and came across how to remove the fan from the case. One interesting point
    in it was that all the pictures i can find show the fan cover as having
    vents in it where as mine has no vents.
    Fan removal shown here
    http://supportapj.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/ins8500/en/8600cr/sm/fan.htm#1000550
    Does anyone else here own an I8600 or similar model and have vents / no
    vents on the fan cover. Thanks for any replies.

    Robert

     
    Robert McMillan, Oct 10, 2005
    #17
  18. Upon starting my computer i just recieved the following message:

    Your system automatically powered off because it became warmer than
    expected.
    This may have been caused by:
    o) operating or storing the system in an environment where the ambient
    temperature is too high, or
    o) obstructing the air flow from the system fan vents.
    If this problem recurs, please phone Dell Support with the error code
    #M1004.

    Interestingly enough though was the fact that this message occured after a
    regular system shutdown and that my system was not in fact "automatically
    powered off". Anyway this seems to confirm my suspicion that it is running
    too hot as the room temperature today has been only 25C which is well within
    operating guidlines. So I will be calling Dell tomorrow. Thanks to everyone
    for there help.

    Robert
     
    Robert McMillan, Oct 10, 2005
    #18
  19. That may have been a reporting glitch, it may have overheated
    previously but not shut down, or hit the overheat limit just as you
    told it to shut down. I wouldn't read too much into it.
    I'd blow the dust out of it and try running it up on blocks for a
    while before calling Dell, tech support (especially on home systems)
    is becoming a real nightmare lately.
     
    William P. N. Smith, Oct 10, 2005
    #19
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