1. This forum section is a read-only archive which contains old newsgroup posts. If you wish to post a query, please do so in one of our main forum sections (here). This way you will get a faster, better response from the members on Motherboard Point.

How to erase chip numbers from a chip?

Discussion in 'Embedded' started by ElderUberGeek, Feb 22, 2006.

  1. What is the best way to remove the chip numbers/information from the
    top of the chips on a PCB? (so that no one knows what chip was
    used...).
     
    ElderUberGeek, Feb 22, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. ElderUberGeek

    JohnH Guest

    file or potting.
     
    JohnH, Feb 22, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. A belt sander will do it, but really, it's generally not a good idea.
    It only advertises that you think your profit margin is too high, and
    any engineer worth their salt can figure it out pretty quickly anyhow.


    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
     
    Spehro Pefhany, Feb 22, 2006
    #3
  4. I wouldn't bother - makes your product look amateurish and won't take someone long to figure it out
    anyway unless it's a really obscure chip, or used in a particularly unusual way.
     
    Mike Harrison, Feb 22, 2006
    #4
  5. ElderUberGeek

    Dave Hansen Guest

    Just slap a big ugly cheap paper "QC" label on the chip in question --
    but stick it on with epoxy.
    You can never make your product completely secure. What you can try
    to do is make the cost of reverse-engineering high enough to make it
    unprofitable. Sometimes raising the bar a little -- making it
    difficult rather than trivial -- is all it takes.

    Regards,
    -=Dave
     
    Dave Hansen, Feb 22, 2006
    #5
  6. ElderUberGeek

    Rich Webb Guest

    An "air eraser" does the trick. It's quite fast and easier than a file
    or sander. You'll need to have good dust management in place, though.
    http://www.bearair.com/prodinfo.asp?number=100072 for one source.
     
    Rich Webb, Feb 23, 2006
    #6
  7. ElderUberGeek

    cs_posting Guest

    Bend all the pins over and solder it to the board upside down...

    Then add a heatsink to some random bit of low power logic.
     
    cs_posting, Feb 23, 2006
    #7
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.