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How to Improve Our Wireless Signal

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by gperry, Jul 1, 2007.

  1. gperry

    gperry Guest

    We have wireless internet that works well everywhere but a back
    bedroom where the signal is very low. We have run a cat5 cable from
    the router to that room but would like to be wireless back there also.
    Moving the router is not an option so my question is, can we simply
    install a second router using the cat5 cable from the main router? or
    is there another solution? Any advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks, GP
     
    gperry, Jul 1, 2007
    #1
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  2. gperry

    mike Guest

    Try moving things around. Sometimes a few inches can make a difference.
    You sure your problem is signal and not interference from your neighbor?
    Try another wifi channel.
    Try a gain antenna on the remote unit. There are some interesting
    designs for directional antennas that are just some tinfoil origami.
    Increases signal and reduces interference.
    You can try a gain antenna on the router, but this can be problematic
    if you have receivers in all directions.

    If you've already got the wire installed, put the new access point
    there.
    mike
     
    mike, Jul 1, 2007
    #2
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  3. gperry

    tc Guest

    Any cheap wireless router can be an access point. Just assign it an ip
    address within the range of the main router, disable DHCP and plug the cable
    into one of the LAN ports rather than the WAN port.
    Terry
     
    tc, Jul 1, 2007
    #3
  4. A second router, no. But you could install a second wireless access point.

    By way of explanation, what you call (what is commonly called) a
    wireless router is actually a compound device consisting of 3 distinct
    items in the same box:

    -Wireless Access Point
    -Router
    -Switch

    All of these are sold separately. You only need one router for the
    entire system, but you could install a 2nd wireless access point.
     
    Barry Watzman, Jul 1, 2007
    #4
  5. My attempts to use wireless routers as access points or even just as
    switches have not generally been successful. It sounds like it should
    work, but it usually doesn't.
     
    Barry Watzman, Jul 1, 2007
    #5
  6. gperry

    Val Guest

    I can give a case of it working.

    D-Link DI-624, connected to my wired LAN into one of its LAN ports. DHCP
    turned off. It got a IP address from my Linksys WRT54GS router, my laptop
    connects to the D-Link and get assigned an IP address by the Linksys.

    And, for more fun, at first I had the D-Link connected via it WAN port with
    DHCP enabled, it gave an IP to my laptop and took care of
    communcation/routing from the Linksys.

    So, two ways it can work.

    Val
     
    Val, Jul 2, 2007
    #6
  7. gperry

    tc Guest

    At this moment, I have a Netgear wireless b/g as my main router/internet
    connection and a DLink a/b/g router acting as an A wireless access point for
    my laptop. I recently picked up a cheap Linksys a/b/g router and hooked it
    up as an AG access point in under 15 minutes.
    Once somebody at DLink pointed out where I was misunderstanding the concept,
    it couldn't have been easier (and routers are generally cheaper and more
    abundant than dedicated access points).
    Terry
     
    tc, Jul 2, 2007
    #7
  8. gperry

    tc Guest

    The problem with the WAN approach as I understand it is the laptop would not
    be able to talk to your other computers on your main router as they would be
    on different networks (e.g. 192.168.0.x and 192.168.1.x).
    Terry
     
    tc, Jul 2, 2007
    #8
  9. gperry

    Val Guest

    I just ran this as a quick "proof of concept" test, so I didn't try to
    traipse around the local net.

    But, since the D-link was functioning as router for the laptop wirelessly
    connected to it, and it was hanging off the local net with a local net
    address, I'm guessing it might still work.

    As they are so fond of saying in the textbooks I use, this is left as an
    exercise for the reader....


    Val
     
    Val, Jul 2, 2007
    #9
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