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How to prevent two processes from starting

Discussion in 'Tablet PC' started by Mark Wharton, Oct 17, 2005.

  1. Mark Wharton

    Mark Wharton Guest

    Does anybody know how to prevent the following two processes from running on
    a tablet PC?

    1. KeyboardSurrogate.exe
    2. Tabbtnu.exe

    If you use Task Manager to end KeyboardSurrogate.exe, it goes away but comes
    back on a restart. If you end Tabbtnu.exe it re-spawns itself immediately.

    The first process puts an on-screen keyboard on the login screen (not needed
    if your tablet PC has a keyboard or if it has a fingerprint reader), the
    second puts a "Change Tablet and Pen Settings" icon in the system tray (I
    think that's all it does but I might be wrong).

    Mark
     
    Mark Wharton, Oct 17, 2005
    #1
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  2. Mark Wharton

    Chris H. Guest

    Which Tablet PC are you on, Mark? I would not recommend removing the
    keyboard at logon. You may need it in an emergency, and then you're going
    to be in big trouble. The Tabbtnu.exe sounds like a utility installed on
    your system, based on the manufacturer of your system. You may be able to
    go into the System Configuration Utility (go to Start/Run, put in "msconfig"
    with quotes to open it), then to the Startup tab and remove the check mark
    from the listing to keep it from launching on Startup. Before removing the
    utility, though, I would check your documentation or the OEM's web site info
    to make sure it doesn't affect something you actually use.
     
    Chris H., Oct 17, 2005
    #2
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  3. tabbtnu.exe is the Microsoft hardware button service. You might be able to
    stop it by disabling the hardware button device but then of course you would
    be sacraficing button support.
     
    Josh Einstein, Oct 17, 2005
    #3
  4. Mark Wharton

    Mark Wharton Guest

    Chris:

    It's an IBM X41T, which has a keyboard, so the on-screen keyboard isn't
    necessary. Actually, entering your password via an on-screen keyboard isn't
    very secure. Any onlooker could see which keys you're tapping on.
    Personally, I'd rather use the real keyboard. However, this machine has a
    fingerprint scanner, which I use, and is even more secure than a real
    keyboard.

    Do you know how to prevent KeyboardSurrogate.exe from running? It isn't in
    the HKLM/SW/MSFT/Win/CurVer/Run branch of the registry (pardon the
    abbreviations) so it must have a registered DLL or something similar.

    Mark
     
    Mark Wharton, Oct 17, 2005
    #4
  5. Mark Wharton

    Mark Wharton Guest

    Josh:

    I have an IBM X41T, which has several IBM utilities managing the hardware
    buttons, and I know which utilities they are. I wouldn't want to disable the
    hardware button support, but would like to keep Tabbtnu.exe from running.

    Thank you for your suggestions.

    Mark
     
    Mark Wharton, Oct 17, 2005
    #5
  6. Mark Wharton

    Chris H. Guest

    There is a Registry setting which I believe you can find by searching the
    Internet, however I don't recommend it at all as I previously stated. If
    you have an alternate method of logging on, it should really only be on your
    screen for the few seconds you're using the other method.

    Try going to Start/Run, put in "msconfig" to launch the System Configuration
    Utility, then go to the Startup tab to see if Tabbtnu.exe is listed. You
    may be able to keep it from launching at Startup by removing the check mark.
    However, it doesn't show on any of my Tablet PCs.
     
    Chris H., Oct 17, 2005
    #6
  7. Mark Wharton

    James Gockel Guest

    Hmm.. I dont even remember how to do it..
    DO NOT DO THIS UNLESS YOU KNOW HOW TO EDIT THE REGISTRY. BACK UP YOUR
    REGISTRY BEFORE MAKING ANY CHANGES.
    I CAN NOT BE HELD RESPONCIBLE FOR ANYTHING YOU DO IN YOUR REGISTRY.
    in
    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\TabletTip\LoginKeyboard]
    You can just remove the default in the next key.

    But it'd be just stupid to do so. But it's your computer, so do what you
    want.
    -James
     
    James Gockel, Oct 17, 2005
    #7
  8. Mark Wharton

    James Gockel Guest

    I also cannot be held responcible for any spelling errors in my messages.
    -James

     
    James Gockel, Oct 17, 2005
    #8
  9. Mark Wharton

    Jan Wagner Guest

    I posted this a longer time ago: to remove the login keyboard, you
    need to unregister loginkey.dll

    regsvr32 "c:\program files\common files\microsoft
    shared\ink\loginkey.dll" /U

    It hasn't shown any side effects on my Acer C302 yet.
    I don't think you can remove it, other than maybe renaming
    tabbtnu.exe (and renaming may break a lot... I certainly wouldn't
    recommend doing that).

    If you are only annoyed by the icon in the system tray: Control
    Panel, Taskbar and Start Menu, check "Hide inactive icons", click
    Customize, set "Change tablet and pen settings" to "always hide".

    Don't "optimize" your system too much! ;-))

    cheers,
    - Jan
     
    Jan Wagner, Oct 17, 2005
    #9
  10. Mark Wharton

    Jan Wagner Guest

    LOL! Well, use the TIP and handwriting recognition, and you may get
    less spelling errors :) (nevermind the grammar ... ;)

    - Jan
     
    Jan Wagner, Oct 17, 2005
    #10
  11. James:

    Thanks for the tip (spelling and all!).

    Honestly, I don't understand why so many people think that it's stupid to
    want to remove the login virtual keyboard. This machine has a real, PHYSICAL
    keyboard. The virtual keyboard is not only unnecessary, it creates somewhat
    of a security issue. As a user types their password on the physical
    keyboard, the virtual keyboard displays every press of the Ctrl, Alt, and
    Shift keys, giving away bits and pieces of information to curious onlookers.

    Mark

    "James Gockel" <flibbertigibbet007_at_hotmail_dot_com> wrote in message
    | Hmm.. I dont even remember how to do it..
    | DO NOT DO THIS UNLESS YOU KNOW HOW TO EDIT THE REGISTRY. BACK UP YOUR
    | REGISTRY BEFORE MAKING ANY CHANGES.
    | I CAN NOT BE HELD RESPONCIBLE FOR ANYTHING YOU DO IN YOUR REGISTRY.
    | in
    | [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\TabletTip\LoginKeyboard]
    | You can just remove the default in the next key.
    |
    | But it'd be just stupid to do so. But it's your computer, so do what you
    | want.
    | -James
    |
    |
    |
    | | > Chris:
    | >
    | > It's an IBM X41T, which has a keyboard, so the on-screen keyboard isn't
    | > necessary. Actually, entering your password via an on-screen keyboard
    | > isn't very secure. Any onlooker could see which keys you're tapping on.
    | > Personally, I'd rather use the real keyboard. However, this machine has
    a
    | > fingerprint scanner, which I use, and is even more secure than a real
    | > keyboard.
    | >
    | > Do you know how to prevent KeyboardSurrogate.exe from running? It isn't
    in
    | > the HKLM/SW/MSFT/Win/CurVer/Run branch of the registry (pardon the
    | > abbreviations) so it must have a registered DLL or something similar.
    | >
    | > Mark
    | >
    | > | >> Which Tablet PC are you on, Mark? I would not recommend removing the
    | >> keyboard at logon. You may need it in an emergency, and then you're
    | >> going to be in big trouble. The Tabbtnu.exe sounds like a utility
    | >> installed on your system, based on the manufacturer of your system.
    You
    | >> may be able to go into the System Configuration Utility (go to
    Start/Run,
    | >> put in "msconfig" with quotes to open it), then to the Startup tab and
    | >> remove the check mark from the listing to keep it from launching on
    | >> Startup. Before removing the utility, though, I would check your
    | >> documentation or the OEM's web site info to make sure it doesn't affect
    | >> something you actually use.
    | >> --
    | >> Chris H.
    | >> Microsoft Windows MVP/Tablet PC
    | >> Tablet Creations - http://nicecreations.us/
    | >> Associate Expert
    | >> Expert Zone - www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    | >>
    | >>
    | >> | >>> Does anybody know how to prevent the following two processes from
    | >>> running on a tablet PC?
    | >>>
    | >>> 1. KeyboardSurrogate.exe
    | >>> 2. Tabbtnu.exe
    | >>>
    | >>> If you use Task Manager to end KeyboardSurrogate.exe, it goes away but
    | >>> comes back on a restart. If you end Tabbtnu.exe it re-spawns itself
    | >>> immediately.
    | >>>
    | >>> The first process puts an on-screen keyboard on the login screen (not
    | >>> needed if your tablet PC has a keyboard or if it has a fingerprint
    | >>> reader), the second puts a "Change Tablet and Pen Settings" icon in
    the
    | >>> system tray (I think that's all it does but I might be wrong).
    | >>>
    | >>> Mark
     
    Mark J. Wharton, Oct 17, 2005
    #11
  12. Jan:

    That's the ticket for removing the login virtual keyboard! Thanks; that
    worked.

    Yes, on a little 12" display, the icon is consuming scare screen real
    estate, so I'd like to remove it. Hiding it is not an option; people are
    always suggesting that one to me. Call it personal preference or prejudice,
    but I don't use this feature of the taskbar.

    Since the functions provided by the "Change Tablet and Pen Settings" tray
    icon are available in the control panel, a tray icon is redundant. I was
    hoping that there was a similar dll to unregister that would remove it. I
    was hoping to get a response from a programmer who understands how this part
    of the Tablet PC software works.

    Optimizing is a personal thing, much like a person will "optimize" their
    furniture in the living room. I've been able to personalize the UI of
    Windows pretty much to my own likes and dislikes, but if you want a real
    good example of customizable, take a look at KDE on Linux. Their UI can be
    tweaked almost any way your little heart desires.

    Mark

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Jan Wagner" <>
    Newsgroups: microsoft.public.windows.tabletpc
    Sent: Monday, October 17, 2005 6:42 AM
    Subject: Re: How to prevent two processes from starting


    | I posted this a longer time ago: to remove the login keyboard, you
    | need to unregister loginkey.dll
    |
    | regsvr32 "c:\program files\common files\microsoft
    | shared\ink\loginkey.dll" /U
    |
    | It hasn't shown any side effects on my Acer C302 yet.
    |
    | If you are only annoyed by the icon in the system tray: Control
    | Panel, Taskbar and Start Menu, check "Hide inactive icons", click
    | Customize, set "Change tablet and pen settings" to "always hide".
    |
    | Don't "optimize" your system too much! ;-))
    |
    | cheers,
    | - Jan
     
    Mark J. Wharton, Oct 17, 2005
    #12
  13. I agree, Mark. On a laptop if your physical keyboard goes you're just as
    screwed (until you get to a USB keyboard). And we all know keys dying on
    laptops are one of the most common problems. My money is on the fingerprint
    scanner any day.

    --
    Josh Einstein
    Tablet Enhancements for Outlook 2.0 - Try it free for 14 days
    www.tabletoutlook.com

     
    Josh Einstein, Oct 17, 2005
    #13
  14. Mark Wharton

    Jan Wagner Guest

    Nice to hear it's a solution for you.
    Ok! Personally I've been generally pleased with that icon hiding
    feature, ~10 necessary apps in the tray but only 2 most critical shown.
    True. With "careful in optimizing" I meant doing those things that
    aren't directly intended for the users and which Microsoft doesn't
    endorse ;-) For example, unregistering the loginkey.dll. I.e. things
    that /might/ eventually break something crucial. Like cutting out
    that last piece of supportive wall in the living room just to fit a
    larger "panel" TV.

    But - hopefully someone else has another idea on how to remove that
    icon.
    I'm running KDE (XP Pro Tablet + SuSE 9.3 dual boot) as the linux
    window manager, and yes, I do realize XP's deficiency in that regard! ;)

    If you feel like doing something rather radical to your XP shell,
    then you could try out GeoShell at http://www.geoshell.com/

    GeoShell has it's shortcomings, but overall it is rather neat. It
    allows for a "gripper hide" style of hiding unnecessary panels, has
    those familiar panel plugins, menus fold correctly to the left (for
    right-handed tablet pen users), etc. The default geoshell skin is a
    bit on the tiny side, so although it works fine on my 14" 1024x768
    screen and the tablet pc pen, it /might/ be a problem on 12".

    If you're really into recovering screen estate, you can probably
    find a few more shell candidates via http://deskmod.modblog.com/
    (Blackbox 4 Windows, LiteStep, ..., and IIRC there used to be at
    least one commercial one around, too, called "Style XP" or something
    similar)

    That's just to give you an idea about linux-like desktop
    customizeability in XP. But back in reality, maybe the thought of
    replacing the entire shell is a bit overkill, just to remove one
    single annoying icon! :)

    regards,
    - Jan
     
    Jan Wagner, Oct 17, 2005
    #14
  15. I can give you a reason. I just got my Toshiba m200 back from replacing the
    keyboard. On a business trip in September I spilled diet coke on it.
    Everything on my computer continued to work EXCEPT about half the keys on
    the keyboard and 2 of the bezel buttons no longer worked.

    Some of those missing keys were required for me to type in my password. I
    suspect your finger print reader is also on your bezel and would be just as
    likely as my bezel buttons to stop working under the same set of
    circumstances.

    Despite the fact that my keyboard was non-functional I made it through the
    next 5 days of that business trip, returned home to find a hurricane on my
    doorstep. By the time it was possible to think about sending the tablet in
    for repair I had another business trip scheduled. Then played catch-up on my
    return.

    So I was able to continue to work on the tablet for almost a month before
    sending it in for repair. Without the ability to login using the on screen
    keyboard I'd have been dead in the water for the remainder of that business
    trip (or working on a French language external keyboard with keys in the
    wrong place) and been stuck taking my Mac PowerBook (my other portable) to
    two Microsoft conferences (at Microsoft).
     
    Cheryl D Wise, Oct 24, 2005
    #15
  16. Mark Wharton

    Ken Schaefer Guest

    I agree with Mark (and others) that the onscreen keyboard is a real security
    issue, and I can understand why people wish to remove it. Shoulder surfers
    can see what you're typing (the keys, and the modifiers, ala shift, via the
    onscreen keyboard)

    In the situation you describe, it would have been relatively trivial to
    attach an external keyboard, logon, resurrect the removed registry key, and
    renable the onscreen keyboard.

    Cheers
    Ken

    "Cheryl D Wise" <wiserways.wiserways.com> wrote in message
    :I can give you a reason. I just got my Toshiba m200 back from replacing the
    : keyboard. On a business trip in September I spilled diet coke on it.
    : Everything on my computer continued to work EXCEPT about half the keys on
    : the keyboard and 2 of the bezel buttons no longer worked.
    :
    : Some of those missing keys were required for me to type in my password. I
    : suspect your finger print reader is also on your bezel and would be just
    as
    : likely as my bezel buttons to stop working under the same set of
    : circumstances.
    :
    : Despite the fact that my keyboard was non-functional I made it through the
    : next 5 days of that business trip, returned home to find a hurricane on my
    : doorstep. By the time it was possible to think about sending the tablet in
    : for repair I had another business trip scheduled. Then played catch-up on
    my
    : return.
    :
    : So I was able to continue to work on the tablet for almost a month before
    : sending it in for repair. Without the ability to login using the on screen
    : keyboard I'd have been dead in the water for the remainder of that
    business
    : trip (or working on a French language external keyboard with keys in the
    : wrong place) and been stuck taking my Mac PowerBook (my other portable) to
    : two Microsoft conferences (at Microsoft).
    :
    : : > James:
    : >
    : > Thanks for the tip (spelling and all!).
    : >
    : > Honestly, I don't understand why so many people think that it's stupid
    to
    : > want to remove the login virtual keyboard. This machine has a real,
    : > PHYSICAL
    : > keyboard. The virtual keyboard is not only unnecessary, it creates
    : > somewhat
    : > of a security issue. As a user types their password on the physical
    : > keyboard, the virtual keyboard displays every press of the Ctrl, Alt,
    and
    : > Shift keys, giving away bits and pieces of information to curious
    : > onlookers.
    :
    :
     
    Ken Schaefer, Oct 26, 2005
    #16
  17. Except if your USB ports fail as has occurred frequently on my M1300,and
    as happened again now when it came out of stand-by mode.
     
    Mike Williams, Oct 28, 2005
    #17
  18. If your USB, keyboard, and fingerprint scanner all fail, I think it's time
    to get a new Tablet PC. :)

    What we all seem to be forgetting here is that laptops and desktops are all
    subject to this very same problem and I can say with a straight face, I have
    never been locked out of my computer because of a keyboard issue. I'm not
    sure what planets would need to be aligned for all of the above to happen.
    You can also make the same argument that you might break your pen so you
    should never take it out of its sleeve and always use the keyboard instead.
    But that would be ridiculous.
     
    Josh Einstein, Oct 28, 2005
    #18
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