How to recover from bad BIOS settings?

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Alberto, Apr 22, 2004.

  1. Alberto

    Alberto Guest

    I have a PC with an ASUS A7N8X-X mobo, which worked perfectly at its
    nominal speed, no overclocking. Then I had the insane idea to try,
    just for fun, to push a bit the speed limits. I set the CPU clock at
    200 MHz (instead of 166), the multiplier at 12, and the memory timings
    at "Aggressive".
    Result : the PC does not boot anymore, emitting a continous string of
    long beeps. I would like to reset the BIOS settings to the default
    values, but how can I do that? The power on sequence does not proceed
    past the long beeps... why doesn't the BIOS revert to the default
    values when there is an error, like my previous mobo (an Abit) did ?

    Thanks for any help and suggestions
    Alberto
     
    Alberto, Apr 22, 2004
    #1
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  2. Alberto

    BigJim Guest

    pull the battery out for a couple minutes or read the user guide for the
    jumpers that reset the bios to default.
     
    BigJim, Apr 22, 2004
    #2
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  3. Alberto

    Paul Guest

    Don't forget to unplug the computer! You cannot leave +5VSB running
    on the board when you reset the CMOS, as it will burn the dual diode
    on the motherboard.
     
    Paul, Apr 22, 2004
    #3
  4. Alberto

    Wizard Prang Guest

    Have you tried clearing the CMOS by moving jumper CLRTC?

    Prang
     
    Wizard Prang, Apr 22, 2004
    #4
  5. Alberto

    Alberto Guest

    That worked, thanks, my PC is resurrected.
    But shouldn't this mobo have a "crashproof" mode, I remember to have
    read words to that effect, where the BIOS reverts to safe values in
    case it is unable to initialize? Or were they just advertizing lies?
    It isn't so comfortable to disconnect all the cables, put the PC on a
    table, open the case, etc..... oh well....

    TNX
    Alberto
     
    Alberto, Apr 23, 2004
    #5
  6. Alberto

    Pluvious Guest

    On 23 Apr 2004 07:30:03 -0700, (Alberto) wrote:

    ||> Have you tried clearing the CMOS by moving jumper CLRTC?
    ||>
    ||> Prang
    ||>
    ||That worked, thanks, my PC is resurrected.
    ||But shouldn't this mobo have a "crashproof" mode, I remember to have
    ||read words to that effect, where the BIOS reverts to safe values in
    ||case it is unable to initialize? Or were they just advertizing lies?
    ||It isn't so comfortable to disconnect all the cables, put the PC on a
    ||table, open the case, etc..... oh well....
    ||
    ||TNX
    ||Alberto


    Instead of clearing the CMOS and messing with jumpers isn't is simpler
    to remove the ram sticks and boot? Then shut it down and put the
    memory back in and boot again. A tech friend of mine at my local shop
    showed me that trick and it seems to work.

    Pluvious
     
    Pluvious, Apr 23, 2004
    #6
  7. Alberto

    Wizard Prang Guest


    I can't see how that could work... but if it works for him, great.

    Besides, swapping the jumper seems easier to me. :)

    Prang
     
    Wizard Prang, Apr 24, 2004
    #7
  8. Alberto

    John Guest

    Crash proof in one thing but, imbecile proof is another
     
    John, Apr 25, 2004
    #8
  9. Alberto

    KCB Guest

    Next time this happens, try holding the Insert key when you turn it on.
    This may let you enter your BIOS by loading default settings.
     
    KCB, Apr 25, 2004
    #9
  10. Alberto

    Gene Puhl Guest

    Speaking of tricks, pressing "Pause" when you want to read the 2nd screen
    of the BIOS info is a good one. The one that tells you what drives are
    installed, com port addresses, memory slots in use etc.
     
    Gene Puhl, Apr 26, 2004
    #10
  11. Alberto

    Alberto Guest

    Nope... did try that, didn't work...


    Are you speaking from your personal experience?

    Alberto
     
    Alberto, Apr 26, 2004
    #11
  12. Alberto

    Tip Guest

    Thanks for that tip. I used it yesterday to get a pc up and running. Much
    easier than hunting for the motherboard jumper setting to reset the CMOS.

    Woot, thx.
     
    Tip, Apr 27, 2004
    #12
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