1. This forum section is a read-only archive which contains old newsgroup posts. If you wish to post a query, please do so in one of our main forum sections (here). This way you will get a faster, better response from the members on Motherboard Point.

IAR versus HEW (Renesas High-performance Embedded Workshop)

Discussion in 'Embedded' started by Like2Learn, Apr 1, 2011.

  1. Like2Learn

    Like2Learn Guest

    We have a middle-scale C project for embedded network device
    development, and I need to choose one IDE between the IAR and Renesas
    HEW. The MCU is Renesas RX62N, and RTOS is a small-footprint not-so-
    popular one.

    Have anybody used both of these IDE before? What is your preference?
    Could you please let us know the main reason for your choice.

    Thank you very much for sharing!
     
    Like2Learn, Apr 1, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. I have used both, but don't like to comment on preferences. However, if
    you download the FreeRTOS .zip file you will find RX62N projects that
    use both. The FreeRTOS projects can be used with free eval versions of
    HEW and IAR, so I would suggest you try both and find your own
    preference before making a decision.

    http://www.freertos.org/FreeRTOS_RX62N_Renesas.html
    http://www.freertos.org/FreeRTOS_RX62N_GCC_GNURX.html
    http://www.freertos.org/FreeRTOS_RX62N_IAR.html


    Regards,
    Richard.

    + http://www.FreeRTOS.org
    Designed for Microcontrollers. More than 7000 downloads per month.

    + http://www.SafeRTOS.com
    Certified by TÜV as meeting the requirements for safety related systems.
     
    FreeRTOS info, Apr 2, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Like2Learn

    Chris H Guest

    In message <
    Are you interested in the IDE or the compiler/debugger?
     
    Chris H, Apr 3, 2011
    #3
  4. I have used both IAR and HEW for Renesas M32, compiling pure C code
    (including a small kernel). This was a couple of years ago.

    In a nutshell:

    1) Both IDEs (and compilers) do a god job.
    2) Code size is better with IAR compiler, probably because their libraries
    are better in this regard (if you don't use any standard C library, this is
    not an issue).
    3) HEW is a better IDE when your target has more than one CPU and you want
    to debug them running in parallel.

    BUT if I had to choose one of them for another processor, I'd test them
    again.
     
    Ignacio G. T., Apr 5, 2011
    #4
  5. Like2Learn

    ChrisQ Guest

    No recent experience of IAR, but worked on a project for 18 months or so
    using Renesas M32C87, the usb emulator and ide based tools.

    Good points:

    * Very good compiler, producing at times a single line of assembler per
    line of C

    * Free updates for the tools, with auto update utility

    * Ide good and easy to get productive, though as usual only using a
    fraction of capability.

    * Ide and toolchain didn't crash once and no bugs found.

    Bad points:

    * Emulator screws into special adapter, soldered s/m, on pcb, which is
    expensive, quite fragile and not physically robust enough for the job.
    Whole assembly on pcb is top heavy and only held in place with the
    (100pin) surface mount adapter. Solution is to epoxy each corner
    of the adapter to the pcb and is essential to avoid tearing off the
    adapter with careless tug on usb or power connector cable etc.

    * Special s/m adapters mean that you have to get a small batch specially
    made from production, although pinout profile is the same as the processor.

    * Emulator is approx 800.00 ukp each, but tools free for download and
    evaluation.

    * Some docs can be difficult to find on the Renesas website

    Other than the above, it just worked out of the box, there were no
    showstoppers at any stage and it got the job done. For an alternative
    gcc based toolchain, the Canadian company Kpit Cummins do an Eclipse
    toolchain for the full range of Renesas processors and are free, fwir.

    Regards,

    Chris
     
    ChrisQ, Apr 5, 2011
    #5
  6. Like2Learn

    Like2Learn Guest

    Thanks. I will read the links.
     
    Like2Learn, Apr 5, 2011
    #6
  7. Like2Learn

    Like2Learn Guest

    Good question. I think I prefer the compiler/debugger more than IDE
    itself.
     
    Like2Learn, Apr 5, 2011
    #7
  8. Like2Learn

    Like2Learn Guest

    Good point. Thank you for sharing.
     
    Like2Learn, Apr 5, 2011
    #8
  9. AFAIK KPIT Cummins were at least originally an Indian company. I used
    their SuperH toolchains on Windows for hobby projects many years ago
    (before they started distributing HEW), and they seemed to know what they
    were doing. They support registered users (registration is free), and when
    I reported a case of inefficient code generation they fixed it and pushed
    the change to upstream GCC.

    -a
     
    Anders.Montonen, Apr 5, 2011
    #9
  10. For several years (up until about two years ago) I used their H8
    toolchain source releases (from which I build my own executables).
    They were definitely an Indian company, and they very definitely knew
    what they were doing.

    I assumed they were either sponsored by Hitachi[1] or where heavy
    users of Hitachi processors, because they certainly never tried to get
    any money from me. Judging by the results, I would have guessed they
    had several people dedicated full time to maintenance of the Hitachi
    toolchains (H8 and SH).

    [1] Despite the "merger" I never saw any indication that the Hitachi
    and Mitsubishi microcontroller groups worked together or even
    talked to each other. To me, they're still seperate operations.
     
    Grant Edwards, Apr 5, 2011
    #10
  11. Like2Learn

    Paul Guest

    Definitely one of the better Indian companies. Their whois for
    kpitcummins.com/.org still lists India so does their gnuh8.com .
    I do believe they were sponsored by Hitachi, may still be by Renesas
    that is from my recollection of limited conversations and emails with
    Hitachi guys in UK. Then some of the Hitachi guys at least knew of me
    as Grant would know.
    That was my view as well
    The R series Mitsubishi seems to be heavily pushed these days at the
    lower volume end, the H Hitachi series seem to be retreating even more
    to their high volume markets like automotive. As for SH Hitachi I see it
    less and less even being promoted, probably due to ARM/MiPS competition.

    --
    Paul Carpenter |
    <http://www.pcserviceselectronics.co.uk/> PC Services
    <http://www.pcserviceselectronics.co.uk/fonts/> Timing Diagram Font
    <http://www.gnuh8.org.uk/> GNU H8 - compiler & Renesas H8/H8S/H8 Tiny
    <http://www.badweb.org.uk/> For those web sites you hate
     
    Paul, Apr 6, 2011
    #11
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.