iCloud mail imap access...?

Discussion in 'Apple' started by glawrie, Oct 13, 2011.

  1. glawrie

    glawrie Guest

    I've got access to my @me.com email address via the iCloud web page,
    but cannot get IMAP access from mail.app - I've tried deleting and
    recreating the account, but doesn't want to play.

    Mail.app sets the incoming IMAP server to p99-imap.mail.me.com and
    doesn't allow this value to be changed. Then seems to be unable to
    connect to this server using my @me.com credentials.

    Anyone got any ideas what's going on / what can do to work around etc?

    Thanks in advance
     
    glawrie, Oct 13, 2011
    #1
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  2. Patience is most likely the answer. They've been having issues all
    morning with iCloud. Just wait and things should clear up.
     
    Lloyd E Parsons, Oct 13, 2011
    #2
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  3. glawrie

    Tom Stiller Guest

    I was finally able to set up me.com mail in Mail.app using IMAP by a
    combination of the System Preference "Mail, Contacts, Calendars" and the
    Mail Accounts preference pane.

    I'd give exact instructions but I tried so many combinations I can't
    recall exactly what worked.

    I know that I created an account that didn't work (server not
    responding) and suddenly a working account popped up Mail's list of
    InBoxes.

    Go figure.
     
    Tom Stiller, Oct 13, 2011
    #3
  4. glawrie

    Andy Hewitt Guest

    [..]
    I think you'll find it probably just started working again. I just left
    mine a few hours, and it's now up and running again.

    It always amazes me how people are so surprised when things like this
    happen in the few hours immediately after a major service release. Apple
    have just released a major update to the OS, and some apps (Aperture was
    660MB for one), a new online syncing system, new OS for the mobile
    devices etc.
     
    Andy Hewitt, Oct 13, 2011
    #4
  5. glawrie

    Richard Hix Guest

    About Noon, Texas Time, today; I finally called Apple. I'd been
    getting notices off and on all morning that the iCloud server was not
    recognizing my MobileMe/iCloud password. The Apple rep said they were
    having server problems and that all should be well soon. I've had no
    problems since mid afternoon. Looks like it's working now.
    Richard
     
    Richard Hix, Oct 14, 2011
    #5
  6. glawrie

    Wes Groleau Guest

    Are you blaming it on being a few hours after release,
    or on the fact that it has loads of new code in it?

    I'm not surprised if their servers are overloaded the first few hours.

    But I'm still having trouble accepting the idea that Apple
    may be gradually adopting the quality control "best practices"
    of Microsoft and the U.S. auto industry. I refer to the
    practice of changing the job title from
    "Quality Assurance Engineer" to "Customer"
     
    Wes Groleau, Oct 14, 2011
    #6
  7. glawrie

    JF Mezei Guest


    Nop. It is a just a company getting a bit cocky and thinking its
    infrastructure can take a worldwide roll out all on the same day.
     
    JF Mezei, Oct 14, 2011
    #7
  8. On the other hand this certainly is the thing people want and how it
    should be done. Spreading a rollout over weeks or months is just easier
    on the infrastructure, but not "better".

    I think Apple deserves some respect for not only doing this, but at the
    same time spreading 10.7.2, a new iTunes, iPhoto, Aperture and iWork
    *and* having iCloud going online. With certainly about 100 million iOS
    devices being able to take iOS 5 this was both a highly critical rollout
    and one of enormous scale. I don't know if Apple is cocky here or just
    confident.


    Jochem
     
    Jochem Huhmann, Oct 14, 2011
    #8
  9. glawrie

    Guest Guest

    On the other hand this certainly is the thing people want and how it
    should be done. Spreading a rollout over weeks or months is just easier
    on the infrastructure, but not "better".[/QUOTE]

    anything would have been better than the meltdown they had, and nobody
    said weeks or months. they could have released a number of the items a
    day or two earlier and even a few a day or two later.
    and xcode 4.2, which is about 1.6 gig by itself.
    or stupid.
     
    Guest, Oct 14, 2011
    #9
  10. glawrie

    Alan Browne Guest

    I can't get at my old @me.com address either in the iCloud - it's
    "taken" (by me of course).

    iClould does not show updates to my Calendar on the Mac or the iPhone.

    Reminders of the mobile.me fiasco.
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 14, 2011
    #10
  11. Well, iTunes *was* released a day earlier and all the OS X bits probably
    didn't have such a large impact on traffic because most iPhone/iPad
    users are running Windows anyway. And the "meltdown" was very limited in
    time, when I updated yesterday I had no problems at all.
    Doesn't compute. You don't get such a rollout going without thinking
    about that. They knew what they were doing I'd say.


    Jochem
     
    Jochem Huhmann, Oct 14, 2011
    #11
  12. glawrie

    Guest Guest

    Well, iTunes *was* released a day earlier and all the OS X bits probably
    didn't have such a large impact on traffic because most iPhone/iPad
    users are running Windows anyway.[/QUOTE]

    source for that?
    you're lucky. the meltdown was most of the day and even into the next
    day. last night, a friend of mine was trying to get his ipad working
    and that took a while.

    today, the iphone activation servers are overloaded.

    this isn't the first time it happened either.
    they do? doesn't look that way.

    they built a brand new data center which *should* be able to handle it,
    but it definitely didn't. something is obviously wrong somewhere.
     
    Guest, Oct 14, 2011
    #12
  13. glawrie

    Andy Hewitt Guest

    [..]
    It's easy isn't it?

    The first few hours, and days, the servers and networks will be
    overloaded by people downloading all the updates, settings up accounts
    and complaining on forums.

    Once things have settled down, the systems will easily be able to cope
    with the load they were designed for. No company in their right mind is
    going to buy equipment to cope with 48 hours of temporary overload.

    Just be patient, it's already starting work fairly normally.

    FWIW, considering the amount of loading their systems must have had in
    the first few hours, I'd say it all coped pretty well indeed.
     
    Andy Hewitt, Oct 14, 2011
    #13
  14. No, but if you insist in it I could google for you. But since there are
    much more iOS devices in use than Macs there's no question about this
    anyway.
    What, they should build their data centers to shrug off a one-time spike
    like that? Which will never again happen, since from now on it will be
    delta-updates with iOS? How idiotic would this be?


    Jochem
     
    Jochem Huhmann, Oct 14, 2011
    #14
  15. glawrie

    Guest Guest

    No, but if you insist in it I could google for you. But since there are
    much more iOS devices in use than Macs there's no question about this
    anyway.[/QUOTE]

    not according to a survey today of those in line for an iphone 4s (a
    random sample), where it's fairly close and that is what one would
    expect.

    <http://www.macrumors.com/2011/10/14/survey-of-regent-street-iphone-4s-l
    ine-reveals-record-crowd-and-other-tidbits/>
    one time spike? this has been a problem since the iphone 3g.

    there's a difference between higher than normal volume (which people
    expect) and a total meltdown. according to appleinsider, 1 out of 2
    attempts failed. that's broken.

    <http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/11/10/12/error_3200_massive_ios_5_
    demand_hinders_apples_servers.html>

    Apple's servers are said to be only accepting about half the
    requests, and even if access is granted, users have reported that the
    download takes about 15 minutes. It has also been noted that,
    following a successful download, the backup process is taking much
    longer than usual to complete, with some seeing 3 hour wait times.
     
    Guest, Oct 14, 2011
    #15
  16. Funny how this should work out with about 50 million Macs and more than
    200 million iOS devices.
    Maybe, but first it happened only at high-profile updates and second it
    won't happen again this way because from now on iOS supports delta
    updates (instead of the full OS images up to now).
    And to avoid 1 out of 2 attempts to fail for a day or two they should
    scale their network connections and servers and everything for that
    single spike?


    Jochem
     
    Jochem Huhmann, Oct 14, 2011
    #16
  17. glawrie

    Guest Guest

    Funny how this should work out with about 50 million Macs and more than
    200 million iOS devices.[/QUOTE]

    funny how there's not a 1:1 relationship between mac ownership and ios
    devices. a lot of people have more than one ios device, especially
    families where each person has an iphone or ipod touch and maybe an
    ipad for the family, but just one or two macs (or windows boxes for
    that matter).
    are you guaranteeing that?
    it should not fail.

    a short delay is understandable when there's a major update. cryptic
    errors, bricked iphones and lost data are *not* acceptable.
     
    Guest, Oct 14, 2011
    #17
  18. Yeah, but then there are also a lot of people and schools and companies
    who own Macs and no iPhone/iPad.

    But if you want to believe that most iOS users also use a Mac, do that.
    Why should *I* guarantee that? It's one major feature of iOS 5. Apple
    will have that factored in. It will be a major reason to change that,
    distributing full OS images for updates just scales very badly.
    I don't think that bandwidth or server bottlenecks have led to bricked
    iPhones or lost data. In a perfect world nothing of this would happen of
    course, but with 200 million devices out there shit happens now and
    then.


    Jochem
     
    Jochem Huhmann, Oct 15, 2011
    #18
  19. Any sort of software upgrade _should_ go flawlessly, otherwise it should
    be canceled until everything is in place so that it does. I don't know
    how Apple forecast, planed, and built for the server load that this
    update would create.

    There are people out there that do such things for a living, usually for
    banks. The initial AT&T rollout of the iPhone was a total disaster and
    I'm sure those people aren't working for Apple or AT&T any more.
    How Apple responds to the outage is more important. AT&T just pretended
    everything was fine leaving customers with no phone while the
    registration issues were ironed out.

    Waiting a few _weeks_ if not months to get a .1 version of a major
    release is my usually strategy to avoid these sorts of things, YMMV.
     
    Michael Vilain, Oct 15, 2011
    #19
  20. glawrie

    Paul Sture Guest

    On Fri, 14 Oct 2011 17:29:12 +0100
    That is precisely the sort of the thing that "on demand" computing is
    supposed to cater for. Need some extra wallop for 48 hours? Rent the
    resources from Amazon or whoever.
    I don't recall problems when Lion was first released. In fact I was
    surprised to see some security updates come down during that.
     
    Paul Sture, Oct 21, 2011
    #20
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