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Is it safe to travel with laptop hibernated, or is it better to shut it off??

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by xx, Jan 31, 2004.

  1. xx

    xx Guest

    -------
     
    xx, Jan 31, 2004
    #1
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  2. xx

    E Brown Guest

    On 31 Jan 2004 00:15:02 -0800, (xx) wrote:

    Perfectly safe to have it hibernated - it's exactly the same as being
    off, except the contents of your RAM are saved to a file on the hard
    drive. Heck, I travel with my laptops in suspend - quicker
    verification at the airport if they ask.
    Emanuel
     
    E Brown, Jan 31, 2004
    #2
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  3. xx

    LarryLOOK Guest

    What is "suspend". Is it equivalent to standby?

    Also does standby use the battery more than hibernate? And how long will
    the average new laptop battery last while in hibernate? (Just a very rough
    estimate is fine for my purposes).
     
    LarryLOOK, Jan 31, 2004
    #3
  4. xx

    E Brown Guest

    Suspend is (apparently) old people speak for standby. Sigh.
    Hibernate doesn't use *any* battery life, but it takes a bit longer
    for the system to wake up - mostly dependent on hard drive speed.
    Standby uses some battery power - how little depends on how well
    it's implemented by your laptops maker. My IBM Thinkpads can suspend
    for days and lose 5 or 10 percent of their charges; my Sony VAIOs
    (with BIOSes written by Phoenix Technologies) will lose 50 percent or
    more over the same period. Most power management outlets provide a
    dialog saying how long they can last in standby.
    Emanuel
     
    E Brown, Jan 31, 2004
    #4
  5. xx

    xx Guest

    Sorry for the multiple post before.

    On my Toshiba Power Saver Properties it says:

    Life on Standby: 50 hours.

    Life on Hibernation: 16 days.

    If its on standby or hibernation, the fan wouldn't be likely to come
    on, or something start beeping, and panic the "homeland security"
    dudes at the airport, would it?

    Also, the drive wouldn't be spinning, and liable to damage, would it?
     
    xx, Feb 1, 2004
    #5
  6. xx

    E Brown Guest

    In neither of those modes does the drive spin, nor does the CPU do
    anything that would activate the fan. I'm surprised the battery drains
    while in hibernate, by Toshibas have always done that.
    Emanuel
     
    E Brown, Feb 1, 2004
    #6
  7. I have an older WinBook Si that I almost never turn off and I never use
    Hiberate.

    I have it set to Standby (NOT Hibernate) when I close the lid. I've
    never had a problem.
     
    Stromm Sarnac, Feb 2, 2004
    #7
  8. xx

    LittleMac Guest

    However... if in your scheduled tasks you tell the computer to wake up
    to perform the scheduled task then you could concivably burn up the CPU.
    Solution: make sure than any scheduled tasks will not wake up the
    'puter -OR- suspend the scheduled tasks for the time that you will have
    it in its bag.
     
    LittleMac, Feb 2, 2004
    #8
  9. xx

    Steve Norris Guest

    I believe that this hibernation estimate is based on the plain fact
    that batteries, even our beloved lith-ions, discharge over time just
    sitting there doing nothing (even as their bosses hibernate)!
    I read somewhere that they can discharge as much as 5% / day just
    sitting. Sounds like an awful lot to me but - your 16 day figure comes
    out to 6.25% / day!
     
    Steve Norris, Feb 2, 2004
    #9
  10. xx

    Gray Beard Guest

    :>On 31 Jan 2004 16:39:41 -0800, (xx) wrote:
    :>>On my Toshiba Power Saver Properties it says:
    :>>
    :>>Life on Standby: 50 hours.
    :>>
    :>>Life on Hibernation: 16 days.
    :>>
    :>>If its on standby or hibernation, the fan wouldn't be likely to come
    :>>on, or something start beeping, and panic the "homeland security"
    :>>dudes at the airport, would it?
    :>>
    :>>Also, the drive wouldn't be spinning, and liable to damage, would it?
    :>
    :> In neither of those modes does the drive spin, nor does the CPU do
    :>anything that would activate the fan. I'm surprised the battery drains
    :>while in hibernate, by Toshibas have always done that.
    :> Emanuel

    Well, if you stop and think about it, there has to be some "active" circuitry
    that "remembers" if the computer was put into hibernation mode on shutdown so it
    knows whether to load the hibernation file back into memory on powerup or to do
    a normal boot into the operating system ignoring the hibernation file that's
    always there in the root of your "system drive".

    Beard
     
    Gray Beard, Feb 2, 2004
    #10
  11. xx

    E Brown Guest

    Not really - coming from hibernation is usually a hidden BIOS
    option similar to having a dual-boot system; hibernating simply writes
    a bit as "load 1" rather than "load 2" and the system detects that on
    boot-up and reads from that file instead of the others in the root
    directory or where ever.
    The thing with Toshibas used to be (and may still be) that rather
    than a CMOS that charged from the adapter when plugged it they used
    one that charged itself from the system battery. As the system sits
    and the battery drains, it pulls more juice from the main and drains
    it more.
    The upside is that losing your CMOS settings takes longer than some
    models if the system sits idle a lot (early Sony CMOS batteries
    drained in about a month, and the system wouldn't boot until you let
    it charge for 10-12 hours) - the downside is the main ages and dies
    sooner.
    Emanuel
     
    E Brown, Feb 3, 2004
    #11
  12. No they must be using some power for holding system status for waking up
    again or something similar. If you pull the battery out while a Toshiba
    is in hibernate, it will do a cold boot when you start it again.


    Noel Bachelor noelbachelorAT(From:_domain)
     
    Noel Bachelor, Feb 3, 2004
    #12
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