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Is liquid cooling any good?

Discussion in 'Overclocking' started by James A. Donald, Dec 7, 2003.

  1. In order to look damn sweet, one has to have the water visibly moving,
    which means an air/water surface in your system has to be visible.

    Not sure how to manage that.
     
    James A. Donald, Dec 9, 2003
    #21
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  2. James A. Donald

    Adam Webb Guest

    I do agree that comparing temps reported by one board against another is
    Abits generaly report lower temps than Asus i think...dunno but i remember
    in the old days of onboard diodes on the A7V, A7V133 vs the Abit KT133 and
    KT133a boards, Asus temps = 50-60ish while Abit was 40-50ish (depending on
    bios)

    Even ondie has not fixed this, as different motherboards have different
    trace lengths and different sensor chips. Comparing temps is too hard, and
    we cant compare cooling by overclock either, since you seem to have a much
    better barton core than mine. mine is week 06 of 2003
    http://www.webb291.freeserve.co.uk/Pictures/WC/New/barton.jpg
    im guessing yours is alot newer?

    In the old days when i first got watercooling i was disapointed with the
    100mhz increase, but now after using water for almost 3 years using Air is
    so limiting (well at least the Alpha 8045's ive got and the CBK-II58). One
    thing i have noticed though, is while Aircooling is noisy when i am next to
    my pc, 10 foot away its quieter, the noise from 80mm fans doesnt seem to
    travel too far...maybe its the pitch of the sound, or maybe its because ive
    got my case side on for the first time in 3 years? :)

    I will be going back to water once i find a way of getting my Socket A block
    onto a Socket 754 board :)
     
    Adam Webb, Dec 10, 2003
    #22
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  3. James A. Donald

    Muttly Guest

    With a uv die and a uv lamb the water currents would be visible and then
    you'd see the water moving. Even with nothing like this a water cooling
    system looks cool.
    Martin.
     
    Muttly, Dec 10, 2003
    #23
  4. James A. Donald

    Hank Guest

    A clear reservoir.

    Hank
     
    Hank, Dec 10, 2003
    #24
  5. Bah, that is for utter newbies. What you want to do is mix colored
    water and mineral oil in your cooling system. Yep, you got it -
    cooling by Lava-Freaking-Lamp! ;)
     
    Michael Cecil, Dec 10, 2003
    #25
  6. James A. Donald

    anthonyi Guest

    I guess water also opens up the possibilities of cooling using a Peltier
    unit. Air doesn't offer that.

    Just my 2 cents...
     
    anthonyi, Dec 10, 2003
    #26
  7. James A. Donald

    BigBadger Guest

    Peltiers really can't cut it with modern CPU's, For 'below ambient' cooling
    you have to go with refrigeration these days..The heat output it just too
    much for pelts.
     
    BigBadger, Dec 10, 2003
    #27
  8. James A. Donald

    anthonyi Guest

    (I'm not yet a pelt or phase change user, but am likely to go one way or the
    other in the next year).

    That's an interesting first point, and not one I've actually come across
    before.

    I guess pelts can still be used to improve cooling without going < ambient.
    In fact, I've seen some product on the web recently designed to vary the
    power to a TEC unit to keep the temps a preset amount above ambient,
    presumably to eliminate the need for condensation proofing.

    From what I understand, pelts do seem to be something of a pain, with the
    condensation issues, high current requirement and (generally) need for a
    dedicated PSU. However, phase change is still pretty expensive for most of
    us, sadly.
     
    anthonyi, Dec 11, 2003
    #28
  9. James A. Donald

    Adam Webb Guest

    T.E.C's are easy to use on modern CPU's. Sure the Heat output is high, but
    thats why your watercooling right?

    Peltier is the effect :)
     
    Adam Webb, Dec 11, 2003
    #29
  10. Biggest problem now is that, as stated before, the amount of heat put out by
    a CPU requires immense pelts to be able to handle it. Once you exceed the
    "rating" of a pelt, things go downhill very fast. For example, the
    ThermalTake (I think it was) peltier setup. After the CPU was overclocked
    and overvolted sufficiently (which wasn't that much), the unit completely
    fell apart performance-wise and became worse than a stock cooler IIRC.
     
    Michael Brown, Dec 11, 2003
    #30
  11. James A. Donald

    SilverBack Guest

    SilverBack, Dec 12, 2003
    #31
  12. James A. Donald

    Adam Webb Guest

    Adam Webb, Dec 12, 2003
    #32
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