Is "PCI-X" and "64-bit PCI" the same thing ?

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Fred Mau, Sep 21, 2007.

  1. Fred Mau

    Fred Mau Guest

    I'm playing around with a surplus PowerEdge 1400SC, dual 1.4 processors.

    I'm thinking it might do adequately as an inexpensive file server for my
    office if I can stick a SATA RAID card in it like an Adaptec 1420SA and a
    couple of cheap SATA drives.

    The Adaptec 1420SA goes in a "PCI-X" slot. The PE1400 has four slots that
    LOOK like this, but the documentation simply calls them "64-bit PCI"

    Is "PCI-X" and "64-bit PCI" in fact the same thing ? Or is it two different
    things that just coincidentally have similar looking slots ?
     
    Fred Mau, Sep 21, 2007
    #1
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  2. Fred Mau

    Jay B Guest

    they are one in the same.

    i would advise against sata raid in that config unless you really really
    need it. and know what you're doing. and you will make really good
    backups of all your irreplaceable data.
     
    Jay B, Sep 21, 2007
    #2
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  3. Fred Mau

    Fred Mau Guest

    Yeah, I need some sort of RAID. I want to set up a small FTP server in
    my SOHO so myself and others can access files remotely, leaving it
    unattended for sometimes weeks at a time. I keep everything backed up on
    DVD but I also want the data online without having to worry about 1 hard
    drive failing when I'm not there.

    When I got the PE1400SC surplus, it had a PERC-2 SCSI RAID card with
    three noisy 18.2 gig drives in a RAID5 array.

    So I COULD theoretically put larger drives on the PERC-2 controller. But
    for the price of even one large scsi drive, I can buy two 160-gig SATA
    drives (about $60 each) plus an adaptec 1420SA raid card (about $100),
    and set up a RAID-1 mirrored array.

    Only thing I wasn't sure of is if I could put the 1420SA, which says
    PCI-X, into the PE1400SC which has 64-bit slots but doesn't specifically
    call them "PCI-X".
     
    Fred Mau, Sep 21, 2007
    #3
  4. Fred Mau

    Jay B Guest

    i personally dont like raid on anything but scsi or SAS (serial attached
    scsi--looks like and backward compatible to sata) so check out sas
    controllers as well. that's what a lot of the new dell servers have.

    the raid mirror is your best safe bet in either case. (i.e. not striping)
     
    Jay B, Sep 21, 2007
    #4
  5. Fred Mau

    Sudohnim Guest

    64-bit PCI and PCI-X are two different things... you can google and
    wikipedia for some background info.

    A quick google suggests that your PE 1400SC is equipped with four 5v
    64-bit 33MHz PCI slots, so you'll either need one of those cards or a
    universal card (a card that works in 5v/3.3v PCI and 3.3v PCI-X slots).
    IIRC the 1420SA falls into the latter category.
     
    Sudohnim, Sep 22, 2007
    #5
  6. Fred Mau

    Jay B Guest

    the slot is the same thing, pci-x starts at 66mhz.
    the OP has 33mhz speeds, the card should work. worst case at a reduced
    speed.
     
    Jay B, Sep 22, 2007
    #6
  7. Fred Mau

    Sudohnim Guest

    I'm not sure what you mean by that. It is my understanding that PCI-X is
    an evolutionary variant of PCI, and that PCI-X uses some different
    signaling/transactions/protocols, making it more than "PCI clocked faster".
    Yes, you can plug a compatible PCI card into a PCI-X slot and the bus/
    slot will run in a convential PCI mode that the card supports thus allowing
    you to use the card. Likewise you can plug a compatible "PCI-X card"
    into a PCI slot and the card will run in a convential PCI mode that the slot
    supports. However, there is a difference between equivalence and (some)
    compatibility. IOW, I believe "64-bit PCI and PCI-X are one in the same"
    to be inaccurate.
     
    Sudohnim, Sep 22, 2007
    #7
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