Is there a huge difference between 64mb and 12mb nVidia FX5600???

Discussion in 'HP' started by The Spectre, Jan 29, 2004.

  1. The Spectre

    The Spectre Guest

    Is there a huge difference between 64mb and 128mb nVidia FX5600??? I am
    looking at getting an HP 7000 series and was wondering. I can get one with
    the 64mb nvidia for like $300.00 cheaper than the 128mb and I just find it
    hard to justify that kind of price difference for just a video card.

    Also, how is performance on games like Call of Duty, 1942, Half-life? I
    realize it may not be cutting edge for latest games but these titles should
    do Ok right?? Anyone have one of these 17" HP's?
     
    The Spectre, Jan 29, 2004
    #1
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  2. The Spectre

    Dan Koren Guest

    Depends on the needs of your application.

    If all the graphics/video data fits into
    64MB, the extra memory won't buy you any
    additional performance.

    Measure it.



    dk
     
    Dan Koren, Jan 30, 2004
    #2
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  3. The Spectre

    Ben Myers Guest

    $300 as the difference in purchase price between 64MB and 128MB graphics
    cards!!! Not worth it. Never. For less than $300, you can buy your own 128MB
    card if you need to, install it, and keep the 64MB card as backup if the 128MB
    card fails due to excessive heat. Wait a couple months and the 128MB card will
    drop in price.

    Or are there other technical differences between the computers to justify the
    $300 difference in price tag??? ... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, Jan 30, 2004
    #3
  4. The Spectre

    Jack T Guest

    I think ben is right the 300$ difference isnt worth it unless you need those
    extra loading times or want to run the highest frames with the highest
    quality textures

    Generally speaking the difference in ram size only influences how much
    faster the game can process textures, if you really need it just buy more
    laptop memory and then open your AGP apeture to a larger number, while this
    is slightly slower that it being on the video board the boost in frames at
    the _MAX_ is only generally 10-20 frames per second from the 64-128, and
    generally a processor that fast runs most games especially ones like half
    life well beyond 100fps (with vsync disabled) and scientifically your eyes
    dont process much over 60 frames per second, so I would just go for the 64,
    and beef up the laptops main memory,
     
    Jack T, Jan 30, 2004
    #4
  5. Hi Spectre,

    I have had my HP Pavilion zd7010us for a little more than 2 months, and I love it. The only bad thing about this machine is
    battery life. I get 1.5 hours on a full charge. I do have all power management turned off (I have a great need for speed (ie.
    performance). The machine is big, but if you use your laptop a lot (I haven't used a desktop in years), you will love the
    screen. The dedicated numeric keypad is great. I liked the machine so much, I bought my son one for his birthday last week, and
    he like it (he's very picky about his computer equipment).

    I have put Uru and Enclave on the machine, and they both play very well.

    Ciao . . .
    C.Joseph

    ++ Let know man judge me until . . .
    he has walked the road I have . . .
    in the shoes I've worn. ++

    http://kalek1.home.mindspring.com
     
    C.Joseph Drayton, Jan 30, 2004
    #5
  6. Hi Ben,

    Spectre is talking about a laptop. Swapping out the graphics card is not a possibility. Pretty much what graphics card you buy
    is what you are stuck with for the life of the laptop.

    Ciao . . .
    C.Joseph

    ++ Let know man judge me until . . .
    he has walked the road I have . . .
    in the shoes I've worn. ++

    http://kalek1.home.mindspring.com
     
    C.Joseph Drayton, Jan 30, 2004
    #6
  7. The Spectre

    Just mee Guest

    Sorry, but that is a total myth, invented by someone who decided that
    since standard television is set at that rate, therefore that was the
    maximum that human eyes could process.. It is a pure falsehood...
    Nothing scientific about it.

    JM


    On Fri, 30 Jan 2004 18:51:19 GMT, "Jack T"
     
    Just mee, Jan 30, 2004
    #7
  8. The Spectre

    Dan Koren Guest

    On the other hand, screen refresh rate on
    most laptops is set at 60Hz and cannot be
    changed, so this matter is academic at
    best.



    dk
     
    Dan Koren, Jan 30, 2004
    #8
  9. The Spectre

    Ken Marsh Guest

    Hi,

    #Is there a huge difference between 64mb and 128mb nVidia FX5600???

    There is no such thing as a 64MB nVidia FX 5600. There are 128MB and
    256MB versions. You have to drop down to an FX 5200 to get down to 64MB.
    At that, there is still no $300 difference between the lowest priced
    5200 (about $55) and the highest price 5600 (about $200 MAX but can be
    had for much less, like $110).

    #I am
    #looking at getting an HP 7000 series and was wondering. I can get one with
    #the 64mb nvidia for like $300.00 cheaper than the 128mb and I just find it
    #hard to justify that kind of price difference for just a video card.

    If someone is trying to sell you any FX 5600 for more than $300, even
    Canadian dollars, they are a rip-off artist. The highest price nVidia
    model is only about $400, but it has 256MB not 128MB (the 5950).

    I don't know about the HP 7000. You have to be careful about putting AGP
    8x cards in 4x machines, some can't handle it.

    #Also, how is performance on games like Call of Duty, 1942, Half-life? I
    #realize it may not be cutting edge for latest games but these titles should
    #do Ok right?? Anyone have one of these 17" HP's?

    Even the lowest-end MX cards will do fine for Half-Life, as it is an old
    game. Call of Duty will require you to turn textures way down or off for
    64MB, but will still play. I don't know about 1942, but since it is
    getting a little old its requirements are probably not onerous.

    Upcoming games promise to use LOTS of textures, using video memory way
    beyond what the screen resolution * color depth requires. If I were
    buying a game video card right now, I would not consider a 64MB card at
    all. I would get at least 128MB and pixel shading, DX9 and OpenGL 1.4,
    probably 256MB, all of which is available for well under US$200, even
    under $150.

    Ken.
     
    Ken Marsh, Jan 30, 2004
    #9
  10. The Spectre

    The Spectre Guest

    Basically, no difference really other than the 64mb card and Home vs. Pro
    operating system... Everything else is the same 3.06, 512RAM, 80GB, nVidia
    5600 64mb. Its a warehouse club special and with their sale and HP's rebate
    comes out to a pretty nice deal, under $1500.00 no tax. I just want to run
    at native mode which I think is 1440x900 at a decent framerate so I can use
    it to play 1942, Call of Duty etc.. Other than that mostly business Apps and
    some music burning.

    Someone said you can swap out the video card is that for certain? I don't
    think so, I though they are part of motherboard on the HP 7000 series
    laptops? If that is true then its an even better deal.

    Thanks for the help I am open to any suggestion as I have a week or so
    before I need to make a decision.
     
    The Spectre, Jan 30, 2004
    #10
  11. The Spectre

    The Spectre Guest

    The Spectre, Jan 30, 2004
    #11
  12. The Spectre

    Cosmin N. Guest

    Not true, unless EVERYTHING you run on that laptop has more than 60fps
    at all times. If it drops below that, you WILL feel it.

    I have a desktop with far better specs than the laptop mentioned in the
    OP, and while I mostly use it for Photoshop, Illustrator et al, I also
    have one weakness: AOps (www.americasarmy.com). There are map portions
    where I get 100fps or more and others where it drops to 20-30fps (this
    is especially true on the Hospital map for those who are playing the
    game). I really couldn't care less if I had a million fps in one
    particular spot, what really hurts me is when it drops below 30fps.

    Cosmin
     
    Cosmin N., Jan 30, 2004
    #12
  13. The Spectre

    Cosmin N. Guest

    I'll throw my 2cents worth into this conversation.

    If you are planning on playing any games at all on this laptop (and it
    seems like you are), get the best video card and CPU you can afford.
    Everything else can be upgraded later on, RAM, HDD, DVD/CDRW, etc. But
    with very, very few exceptions you are stuck with the original CPU and
    video card.

    Cosmin
     
    Cosmin N., Jan 30, 2004
    #13
  14. The Spectre

    Ben Myers Guest

    Oops! I didn't notice that it was a laptop. As a rule, graphics in a laptop
    can't be changed from what arrives when the computer is new... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, Jan 30, 2004
    #14
  15. The Spectre

    Squiggly30 Guest

    I'll throw in my 2 cents worth as well.

    For performance issues, you want to get a hard drive that has 7200 rpm
    rotation speed. Mine only has a 4200 rpm drive in it, and it sucks at
    playing command and conquer generals, zero hour, and my system is a 2.2 Ghz,
    512 mob ram and 64 mob nvidia FX5600.
    My friend's desktop has a slower processor, (Athlon XP 2000) with 512 mob
    ram but with a 7200 rpm hard drive, and the same game runs way faster than
    mine.

    Joe
     
    Squiggly30, Jan 31, 2004
    #15
  16. The Spectre

    Ben Myers Guest

    Interesting tradeoffs here: Speed versus power consumption, heat and battery
    life..

    Faster drives consume more power and run hotter.
    More memory on the graphics subsystem means greater power and more heat.

    There is a good reason notebook computers often have 4200 rpm drives in them.
    Less heat.

    Today, the best notebook computer still cannot hold a candle to a top end
    desktop for gaming.

    So either it's a fast notebook that runs hot and has a short battery life, or a
    slower model which runs cooler and conserves power... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, Jan 31, 2004
    #16
  17. The Spectre

    Squiggly30 Guest

    my laptop is plugged in 95% of the time, so I would welcome the faster hard
    drive, and I can live with the extra bit of heat because it rarely sits on
    my lap, it's almost always on a table or a desk. So, IMHO, bring on the
    speed and performance.

    Joe

     
    Squiggly30, Jan 31, 2004
    #17
  18. The Spectre

    Ben Myers Guest

    Your use of a notebook computer is hardly traditional, but more and more people
    are now using notebook computers the way you do, mostly to conserve space.

    You might be able to live with the extra heat, but maybe the notebook computer
    cannot. Space is awfully tight in there, with precious little breathing room
    for ventilation. One of the reasons that notebooks cost lots more than desktop
    computers is that somebody has done a serious amount of analysis and design to
    satisfy thermal requirements. For example, if you replace a 4200 rpm drive with
    a 5400 rpm drive (or even a 7200 rpm 2.5" drive, if such and animal exists), the
    amount of added heat may not be ventilated sufficiently, and something in the
    system will burn out.

    As a rule, I would approach any and all notebook upgrades with extreme care
    other than the obvious ones of installing more memory and plugging in PC Card or
    USB devices... Ben Myers

    <SNIP!>
     
    Ben Myers, Jan 31, 2004
    #18
  19. The Spectre

    Cosmin N. Guest

    Ben Myers wrote:
    [snip]
    [snip]

    That's exactly the conclusion I reached. I have a very fast desktop for
    my daily computing (mostly Photoshop) and games, and a far slower
    sub-notebook for email, net, web development and other non-intensive tasks.

    And since I purchased the laptop without games in mind, I'm not
    dissapointed when I can't play a single modern game on it. Half Life and
    CS are the only ones that do play well, but they're a bit too old.

    BTW, my laptop is a Compaq Evo N410c, P3m 1.2Ghz, 12.1TFT XGA, 768Mb
    RAM, 30Gb hdd, Radeon 16Mb video card. It does a great job at
    everything, except games. The battery's kinda' shot, so it needs
    replacing, but I still get about 2h of battery life.

    Cosmin
     
    Cosmin N., Jan 31, 2004
    #19
  20. The Spectre

    roger Guest

    Hi Spectre,

    I have a Toshiba 5205-s705 with a NV 5600 64 MB and have had no
    trouble running two games on it so far. I regularly run X-Plane
    simulator and Hot Pursuit 2. Although not particularly stressful they
    both run well. Not being an avid gamer I can't comment on other
    games. Since your processor will be faster than my 2.4 GHz 400FSB,
    I'll bet other games run well too. I'd say you have to weigh the
    $300.00 against just savng it toward a new laptop in the future, when
    games will stress it more. Then you'll want the latest laptop again.
     
    roger, Jan 31, 2004
    #20
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