iTunes and MP3 players

Discussion in 'Apple' started by John Heaney, Dec 19, 2003.

  1. John Heaney

    John Heaney Guest

    I have to say that the new iTunes information on Apple's web site
    doesn't make it clear exactly what you can and can't do. It used to be
    quite clear that I could download songs into a Rio MP3 player. Now there
    is no mention of any players at all, other than the iPod. Can you still
    download music to an MP3 player? More importantly, can you download
    music purchased from the Music Store into non-iPod MP3 players? Even the
    iTunes help doesn't make any of this clear.
     
    John Heaney, Dec 19, 2003
    #1
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  2. John Heaney

    Oxford Guest

    sure you can... you just have to burn all your AAC/Fairplay music files
    to a cd... then the Fairplay DRM is removed and converted to MP3's...
    then copy them back to your mac, then put them on a Rio, etc...

    A couple 100 iTunes songs fit on a CD... so it's not that hard to do...
    get a CD-RW CD and erase / re-use it... so the cost is basically free...

    Oxford

    -
     
    Oxford, Dec 19, 2003
    #2
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  3. John Heaney

    John Heaney Guest

    I found I was still able to download normal MP3s to the Rio 800, so I
    gather you are talking specifically about Music Store files here. I can
    see that it is possible to save them to a CD as MP3s. It seems rather
    annoying that you can't just save those same MP3s to an MP3 player. At
    least there is a workaround. Thanks.
     
    John Heaney, Dec 19, 2003
    #3
  4. John Heaney

    Tom Stiller Guest

    If you're talking about iTunes Music Store downloads, they're not MP3s,
    they're AAC and with or without DRM, you can't expect an MP3 player to
    play them.
     
    Tom Stiller, Dec 19, 2003
    #4
  5. John Heaney

    John Heaney Guest

    But, apparently, you can convert them to MP3s when burning a CD. It does
    not seem unreasonable to allow a conversion to MP3 when downloading to
    an MP3 player. It would just eliminate some steps.
     
    John Heaney, Dec 19, 2003
    #5
  6. John Heaney

    Tom Stiller Guest

    Somehow, I just don't see Apple, who makes and sells iPods and supports
    the AAC audio format, willing to put in extra engineering costs to make
    to make their software directly support a competing product and audio
    format.
     
    Tom Stiller, Dec 19, 2003
    #6
  7. John Heaney

    Oxford Guest

    yes, what we really need is a AAC/Fairplay to MP3 and a WMA to MP3
    converter program... that would solve all this mickey mouse...

    surely someone can figure out exactly what happens when an AAC/Fairplay
    file gets written to CD, same for WMA to CD...

    someone needs to get cracking...

    Oxford

    -
     
    Oxford, Dec 19, 2003
    #7
  8. With non DRM m4a files, you can import them as MP3 without having to
    burn them to a CD. Can't you also do this with the DRM iTMS m4a
    files? I have not purchased any music from iTMS. I have converted
    AAC files I made myself to MP3 for when I needed to play them on an
    MP3 player that doesn't grok AAC.
     
    David Steuber, Dec 19, 2003
    #8
  9. John Heaney

    John Heaney Guest

    Somehow, I just don't see Apple, who makes and sells iPods and supports
    the AAC audio format, willing to put in extra engineering costs to make
    to make their software directly support a competing product and audio
    format.[/QUOTE]

    Well that may be so, but Apple supported MP3 players from the beginning
    with iTunes...long before iPod became the portable music wet dream.
     
    John Heaney, Dec 19, 2003
    #9
  10. John Heaney

    John Heaney Guest

    What iTunes has needed from the beginning is a preferred destination
    format/bit rate setting that does automatic conversions as needed. That
    way, you can set the download quality based on the destination
    independently of the stored quality in your library.
     
    John Heaney, Dec 19, 2003
    #10
  11. John Heaney

    sbt Guest

    Well that may be so, but Apple supported MP3 players from the beginning
    with iTunes...long before iPod became the portable music wet dream.[/QUOTE]

    The difference is that the firmware to play the MP3 is on the MP3
    player (and a lot of them have licensed WMA interpreters as well).
    Apple would have to implement the decoder into the players' firmware to
    put AAC support on a generic MP3 player. It's a relatively trivial
    exercise for them to do so on an iPod, since they control the firmware,
    but not on a Rio or the like.

    Additionally, you can't convert them to MP3 for burning to a CD. If you
    try to burn an MP3 format CD from AAC using iTunes, you'll be presented
    with an error alert saying that it isn't permitted. Burning to a CD
    "expands" them to AIFF (similar to a Windows WAV file, it's a PCM
    format), for compliance with the Red Book standard for CD-DA (Compact
    Disc-Digital Audio). Thus, it is a two-step process...first you write a
    CD-DA, then you import/encode the tracks from that disc as MP3.
     
    sbt, Dec 19, 2003
    #11
  12. John Heaney

    Ken Prager Guest

    Get Audio Hijack Pro. It'll save you a few steps.

    <http://www.rogueamoeba.com/audiohijackpro/features.php>

    HTH,

    KP


    P.S. Also see...

    <http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=convert+aa
    c+to+mp3&sa=N&tab=wg>

    ....for more info.
     
    Ken Prager, Dec 20, 2003
    #12
  13. John Heaney

    John Heaney Guest

    I wasn't suggesting that the Rio be changed to allow playing AAC files,
    but since you bring it up, I wonder why this isn't the case. Apple
    doesn't want to license the technology to other players? The third
    parties don't want to license the technology? The MP3 players don't have
    the ability to support the AAC format (maybe due to a shortage of memory
    or processor power)?
    I see. I guess I must have misunderstood the previous poster. I did just
    check and you are correct, you cannot burn an MP3 CD from purchased
    music.
     
    John Heaney, Dec 20, 2003
    #13
  14. John Heaney

    Tom Stiller Guest

    As others have pointed out, Apple doesn't own the technology. See
    <http://www.vialicensing.com/products/mpeg4aac/licenseFAQ.html>.
     
    Tom Stiller, Dec 20, 2003
    #14
  15. John Heaney

    John Heaney Guest

    John Heaney, Dec 20, 2003
    #15
  16. John Heaney

    frl_4 Guest

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