K7D Master-L - up to which Athlon MP CPU?

Discussion in 'MSI' started by Frank Bergemann, Jul 7, 2008.

  1. Hi,

    i am confused about MSI's pages saying
    (http://global.msi.com.tw/index.php?
    func=proddesc&prod_no=664&maincat_no=133)

    CPU
    • Supports dual Socket A (Socket-462) for AMD® Athlon™ MP processors
    • Supports up to Athlon MP 2800+ or higher

    The board supports 133MHz - with overclocking up to 150 MHz.
    In the BIOS the CPU multiplier is at maximum 12.5

    So it is maximum 150 MHz * 12.5 = 1875 MHz CPU clock.
    This sounds as if MP 2200+ (clocked 1800Mhz) is the maximum.

    So how comes MSI states K7D Master-L supports "MP 2800+ or higher"???

    - thanks for your help

    rgds
    Frank
     
    Frank Bergemann, Jul 7, 2008
    #1
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  2. Frank Bergemann

    Paul Guest

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_AMD_Athlon_XP_microprocessors

    Athlon MP "Barton" (Model 10, 130 nm)
    Athlon MP 2800+ 2133 MHz 512 KiB 266 MT/s 16x 1.60V 60.0W May 6, 2003 AMSN2800DUT4C

    That processor has a multiplier of 16x, so 133 * 16 = 2128MHz. (Equals 2133MHz roughly)

    FSB is FSB266, as the FSB is double data rate, and twice the input clock of 133MHz.

    Note that some motherboards, only have multiplier control for
    four of five FID bits. The MSB of the FID is not controllable.
    The board may use an "overclock controller chip", having only
    four FID bits for setting the multiplier. An overclock
    controller chip, stores the FID between board resets, so the
    board will remember the multiplier to use, when the user
    sets a custom value.

    But the actual processor itself, does have five FID bits to drive
    to the socket. So the processor can set 16x if it wants. It is the
    motherboard controls, that may not be able to set a "custom" value
    of 16x.

    A bridge mod or a socket mod, can be used to program the MSB of the
    FID. Which would be another way to modify it. You would flip the
    upper FID bit, and then you can rely on the BIOS setting to control
    the lower four FID bits. Then, you need a table that maps FID
    setting, to actual multiplier. And while testing, you run at
    clock=100MHz, to reduce the impact of using too high a multiplier
    value by accident. Once the multiplier is verified as being correct,
    the clock can be bumped up to the value you want.

    http://www.ocinside.de/go_e.html?/html/workshop/pinmod/amd_pinmod.html

    I think my motherboard only has a four bit FID control, and I never
    go over 12.5x with it. (I have to use a custom setting, because I have
    a mobile processor, and the default multiplier is too low.) Fortunately,
    my FSB goes to FSB400, so 200 * 12.5 = 2500MHz gives me enough room for
    overclocking experiments, without needing a high multiplier.

    Also, on dual socket S462 boards, you should be a bit careful about
    how the power is provided to the Vcore regulators. If you had two
    60W processors, and the Vcore regulators were 90% efficient, then
    the input power required is 133.3W . If that came from the 5V rail,
    that would be 26.7 amps. The main ATX power connector has four
    wires to carry +5V, and each is rated for 6 amps. For a total of
    24 amps under best conditions. There have been some motherboards in
    the past, that had problems with the power connector, as a result
    of the loading coming from the processors. (And the reason they had
    a problem, is the actual loading on the wires was not even. On
    my own S462 motherboard, there is a 1 amp difference in current
    draw, between the highest current flow and the lowest current
    flow, of the four 5V wires. On badly designed motherboards, if
    that imbalance is large enough, the connector pins burn.)

    What the previous paragraph means in practice, is if you've been
    using two high end processors in your motherboard, then pull and
    check the condition of the ATX power connector pins. All the pins
    should be shiny.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jul 7, 2008
    #2
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  3. Frank Bergemann

    hotwinduk Guest

    Hi Frank,

    That is an AMD Athlon XP processor not an MP processor. The rating of XP
    processors is always higher than the clock speed.

    Visit this page to see the full range of AMD processors;

    Desktop CPU Comparison Guide - AMD processors -

    http://www.techarp.com/showarticle.aspx?artno=337&pgno=0

    Eric,

    http://www.pcbuyerbeware.co.uk/

    Hi,

    i am confused about MSI's pages saying
    (http://global.msi.com.tw/index.php?
    func=proddesc&prod_no=664&maincat_no=133)

    CPU
    • Supports dual Socket A (Socket-462) for AMD® Athlon™ MP processors
    • Supports up to Athlon MP 2800+ or higher

    The board supports 133MHz - with overclocking up to 150 MHz.
    In the BIOS the CPU multiplier is at maximum 12.5

    So it is maximum 150 MHz * 12.5 = 1875 MHz CPU clock.
    This sounds as if MP 2200+ (clocked 1800Mhz) is the maximum.

    So how comes MSI states K7D Master-L supports "MP 2800+ or higher"???

    - thanks for your help

    rgds
    Frank
     
    hotwinduk, Jul 9, 2008
    #3
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