K7N2G-L want to run but won't......

Discussion in 'MSI' started by Mark, Jul 5, 2003.

  1. Mark

    Mark Guest

    I built a system based on a K7N2G-L with an Athlon 2200 yesterday. Every
    time I attempt to start the system, it runs for about 1 or 2 seconds and
    shuts off. After each attempt, it has to be unplugged from the wall in
    order to reset.

    I've swapped the fans around thinking it might be the sensor. Swapped
    the DDR memory thinking it might be bad. Pulled all of the case switches
    and verified their positions are proper. Pulled the CD's to see if it
    might be a low power situation. All of the above had no effect.

    Any ideas out there? I've built 7 other systems based on this board with
    no problems. Other than changing out the power supply, I'm stumped.

    Mark
     
    Mark, Jul 5, 2003
    #1
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  2. Mark

    dsgdag Guest

    I build my own pc´s too. In your case I would try the following...
    - Start it without hard disks connected and see if you can get to bios
    - Lower the fsb to 100, connect the hard drives & cd and try to boot
    - Try to boot with just one memory module

    No help? You might be short circuited
    - Remove the mainboard from the case and place it over the box it came with.
    Put the vid card to slot and try to boot... (connect the power swith from
    the case to the mainboard)
    - If you can boot this way, you were short circuited. Install the mainboard
    back to the case with more attention to contacts between the case and the
    board.
     
    dsgdag, Jul 5, 2003
    #2
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  3. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Hello,

    Thanks for the ideas on my little 'problem child' here.
    I tried that before you suggested it, but a 2nd try couldn't hurt. It
    didn't have any affect.
    Don't know if I can do that without getting into the bios. So far I
    haven't gotten that far. The system shuts down too quick.
    Actually, I usually just start out with a single stick. I've even
    switched the memory module with a known working module. Once everything
    is operating right, I add the second stick.
    Tried that too. Same issue. I'm going to switch out the power supply and
    see if that gives me any relief. I'm using a Enlight case which comes
    with a 300watt power supply. They've worked great on all the other units
    that are identical to this one but it's possible to get a weak supply I
    guess.

    So, if it turns out to be the power supply great. But if it's not the
    power supply then what? Board? Processor? I hate to tear apart a working
    system to test parts from a non-working system.

    Any other suggestions?

    Mark
     
    Mark, Jul 5, 2003
    #3
  4. Mark

    Kevin Guest

    I like the power supply idea, or the board being shorted to the case
    somewhere, but I realize you've eliminated the latter.

    It sounds like something is pulling the supply voltages out of spec
    and causing the power supply to shut down. As I'm sure you're aware,
    it could be anything in the case, from the PSU itself to any of the
    electronics.

    Unfortunately ATX supplies don't want to start without a load. If
    you've got another board that you can test with, that may give you
    some idea of what's going on. Personally, I'd swap out the PSU first,
    rather than nuking a good board with an unknown CPU.

    Kevin.
     
    Kevin, Jul 5, 2003
    #4
  5. Mark

    Doughnut Guest

    I remember having to look at a system with similar problems a year or so
    ago, turned out to be a faulty on/off swicth (sticking in so it turned off
    after 4 secs) on the case. I just took the switch header off and shorted
    the 2 pins with a screwdriver and all was well. Just had to fix the switch.

    doughnut
     
    Doughnut, Jul 5, 2003
    #5
  6. Mark

    Mark Guest

    That wouldn't be too tough to test. The power and reset switches are
    identical so I'll switch the two and give it a test.

    Well, it was worth a try. Still no dice.

    Guess it's time to dig up another ATX power supply. I'll keep you guys
    informed. Thanks for the ideas.

    Mark
     
    Mark, Jul 6, 2003
    #6
  7. Mark

    Spaz Guest

    --
    Mine did that turned out cpu fan wasn't properly seated


    Michael Zentner
     
    Spaz, Jul 6, 2003
    #7
  8. Mark

    Kurt Guest

    Got the same board and had the exact same problem.

    The fix...... flip the cpu fan around 180 degrees.

    One thing to check is the CPU fan, make sure you don't have
    it in backwards. I've built many systems and I did not not catch
    this one. Just goes to show we all make mistakes. :D

    Also, you may want to try and clear the CMOS.
     
    Kurt, Jul 6, 2003
    #8
  9. Mark

    Spaz Guest

    It stopped that quick and yes they can!
     
    Spaz, Jul 6, 2003
    #9
  10. Mark

    pops48 Guest

    when I built my system based on K7N2 it did exactly the same thing.
    Found my cure to be as follows:
    plug mains into case, switch on mains on power supply - system runs for a
    couple of seconds, then press front panel on/off power swicth. Should
    power up ok!!
     
    pops48, Jul 6, 2003
    #10
  11. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Just wanted to thank the group for the help! The gold star winners are
    Michael & Kurt.

    While I was very reluctant to remove the CPU Heatsink, I did so after
    Michael's 2nd post where I questioned the speed that the system sensed
    and shutdown. He confirmed it this morning.

    Then Kurt mentioned having the heatsink turned 180 degrees but this was
    not the situation. I'm using a Thermalright SLK-800A heatsink
    http://www.thermalright.com/slk800.html and the orientation is the same
    on all of them. I was careful to make sure the notch was in the proper
    position.

    Here's what it turned out to be:

    When I get these Thermalright heatsinks they have a pair of small rubber
    bars that are intended to be applied to the edges of the cpu for
    stability. (the SLK-800A only has a narrow area of copper that contacts
    the center of the CPU. It can tip from side to side if the bars are not
    applied) These little rubber bars are always too long so I cut them with
    a scissors before applying them.

    After cutting the rubber bars and applying them, I grabbed the heatsink
    and pulled the protective tape from it. Some of the adhesive was left
    behind on the heatsink so I re-applied the tape repeatedly to get the
    adhesive off. It took about 20 or 30 tries but it all came off. I set
    the heatsink down and applied goop to the CPU and placed the heatsink on
    the CPU.

    Today, when I took the heatsink off the CPU there was a small cutting of
    the rubber bar attached to the bottom of the heatsink. It wasn't on the
    contact area of the CPU but it was close. Apparently, when I set the
    heatsink down, I set it on the rubber cutting and failed to recheck the
    face of the heatsink when I attached it. (see my red face?) It kept the
    heatsink from making full contact.

    Thanks to Michael and Kurt for the help and the insight. Thanks to the
    rest of the group for ideas and encouragement. As I write this the
    system is formatting the 120gig HD.

    Thanks,

    Mark



    Spaz wrote:

    Mine did that turned out cpu fan wasn't properly seated

    Michael Zentner



    Then later...... Kurt wrote:

    Got the same board and had the exact same problem.

    The fix...... flip the cpu fan around 180 degrees.

    One thing to check is the CPU fan, make sure you don't have
    it in backwards. I've built many systems and I did not not catch
    this one. Just goes to show we all make mistakes. :D

    Also, you may want to try and clear the CMOS.
     
    Mark, Jul 6, 2003
    #11
  12. Mark

    Flasherly Guest

    I take new heatsinks and put a little artic silver on them and work it
    out with a thin 3/8" box cutter. A central circular swirl, consistant
    and smooth, similar to fine oil paint with linseed and a palatte
    knife. After seated to the cpu nice and snug, I pull it back off.
    Then I take the box cutter and lightly cut into the face of the
    heatsink along the edges where the cpu die leaves its imprint. With
    guide lines I'm more accurate next time around.
     
    Flasherly, Jul 7, 2003
    #12
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