K9N6SGM-V Won't boot XPSP3 off SATA (or Mepis or Win7 either)

Discussion in 'MSI' started by Nobody > (Revisited), Jul 12, 2011.

  1. I don't have the box in front of me, but would like to figure out the
    fix(es) needed for another time.
    (and apologies for not having written down the BIOS rev, etc)

    As it sits now, it's running fine with a 500G WD PATA drive.
    It just irks the crap out of me that I can't get it working on SATA.

    There are no options in the BIOS to set SATA for IDE emulation or AHCI,
    and there are only 2 SATA ports on the mobo.

    It will access SATA drives just fine, just won't boot.

    I suspect it's BIOS/chipset driver issues (nVidea chipset)

    Tried updating BIOS, but couldn't get MSI's version of AFUDOS to work
    right and didn't feel like trying someone else's AFUDOS at the time.



    The whole idea with going SATA was so that I could keep a
    running/working recent image/copy on a drive sitting in an Antec
    EasySata dockbay for fast recovery. (it's a "long-distance relative"
    support thingie). All that would be needed to get them back up would be
    a quick walk thru the BIOS and they could boot off the SATA drive in the
    EasySata dockbay.

    It's not a big deal, they can still keep a fresh image on the SATA drive
    in the EasySATA and move it back to the PATA drive with a bootCD of
    Easus TODO Backup or Partition Manager (as long as the PATA drive itself
    hasn't crashed, and "this user" is far more likely to hose up the boot
    with "India-Delta-Tenner-Tango" issues<g>)

    But it just pisses me off.

    --
    "Shit this is it, all the pieces do fit.
    We're like that crazy old man jumping
    out of the alleyway with a baseball bat,
    saying, "Remember me motherfucker?"
    Jim “Dandy” Mangrum
     
    Nobody > (Revisited), Jul 12, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Nobody > (Revisited)

    Paul Guest

    Nobody > (Revisited) wrote:
    > I don't have the box in front of me, but would like to figure out the
    > fix(es) needed for another time.
    > (and apologies for not having written down the BIOS rev, etc)
    >
    > As it sits now, it's running fine with a 500G WD PATA drive.
    > It just irks the crap out of me that I can't get it working on SATA.
    >
    > There are no options in the BIOS to set SATA for IDE emulation or AHCI,
    > and there are only 2 SATA ports on the mobo.
    >
    > It will access SATA drives just fine, just won't boot.
    >
    > I suspect it's BIOS/chipset driver issues (nVidea chipset)
    >
    > Tried updating BIOS, but couldn't get MSI's version of AFUDOS to work
    > right and didn't feel like trying someone else's AFUDOS at the time.
    >
    >
    >
    > The whole idea with going SATA was so that I could keep a
    > running/working recent image/copy on a drive sitting in an Antec
    > EasySata dockbay for fast recovery. (it's a "long-distance relative"
    > support thingie). All that would be needed to get them back up would be
    > a quick walk thru the BIOS and they could boot off the SATA drive in the
    > EasySata dockbay.
    >
    > It's not a big deal, they can still keep a fresh image on the SATA drive
    > in the EasySATA and move it back to the PATA drive with a bootCD of
    > Easus TODO Backup or Partition Manager (as long as the PATA drive itself
    > hasn't crashed, and "this user" is far more likely to hose up the boot
    > with "India-Delta-Tenner-Tango" issues<g>)
    >
    > But it just pisses me off.
    >


    A BIOS update is your best bet.

    A Newegg review from 7/10/2008 says

    "Cons: Boot sequence gets confused if you mix SATA and PATA drives
    when both have OSes installed. BIOS settings don't seem to
    stick if you let the normal boot sequence happen. I'm sure
    a BIOS update would fix the problem."

    Since the BIOS is so basic looking, that might be your only option.
    You say you can access the disks in regular situations, so that
    rules out hardware issues.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jul 12, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. On 7/11/2011 11:02 PM, Paul wrote:

    > A BIOS update is your best bet.
    >
    > A Newegg review from 7/10/2008 says
    >
    > "Cons: Boot sequence gets confused if you mix SATA and PATA drives
    > when both have OSes installed. BIOS settings don't seem to
    > stick if you let the normal boot sequence happen. I'm sure
    > a BIOS update would fix the problem."
    >
    > Since the BIOS is so basic looking, that might be your only option.
    > You say you can access the disks in regular situations, so that
    > rules out hardware issues.
    >
    > Paul



    Thanks, that's about what I suspected.

    MSI uses AFUDOS as a BIOS tool (and am well acquainted with it...)
    The version MSI provides is ancient, goes off-screen on both CRT and LED
    monitors.

    I've always used the version supplied by the board vendor, but am
    wondering if using the version(s) directly off AMI's website would work.

    http://www.ami.com/support/bios.cfm

    Actually, it looks like they also have a Windows version as well.
    That may work better in this case, as I'm having to support this machine
    via TeamViewer remotely..



    --
    "Shit this is it, all the pieces do fit.
    We're like that crazy old man jumping
    out of the alleyway with a baseball bat,
    saying, "Remember me motherfucker?"
    Jim “Dandy” Mangrum
     
    Nobody > (Revisited), Jul 12, 2011
    #3
  4. Nobody > (Revisited)

    Paul Guest

    Nobody > (Revisited) wrote:
    > On 7/11/2011 11:02 PM, Paul wrote:
    >
    >> A BIOS update is your best bet.
    >>
    >> A Newegg review from 7/10/2008 says
    >>
    >> "Cons: Boot sequence gets confused if you mix SATA and PATA drives
    >> when both have OSes installed. BIOS settings don't seem to
    >> stick if you let the normal boot sequence happen. I'm sure
    >> a BIOS update would fix the problem."
    >>
    >> Since the BIOS is so basic looking, that might be your only option.
    >> You say you can access the disks in regular situations, so that
    >> rules out hardware issues.
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    >
    > Thanks, that's about what I suspected.
    >
    > MSI uses AFUDOS as a BIOS tool (and am well acquainted with it...)
    > The version MSI provides is ancient, goes off-screen on both CRT and LED
    > monitors.
    >
    > I've always used the version supplied by the board vendor, but am
    > wondering if using the version(s) directly off AMI's website would work.
    >
    > http://www.ami.com/support/bios.cfm
    >
    > Actually, it looks like they also have a Windows version as well.
    > That may work better in this case, as I'm having to support this machine
    > via TeamViewer remotely..


    As long as the BIOS chip is socketed and can be removed for
    maintenance, go for it. If the BIOS chip is soldered in,
    think twice (do the research, and find out how often
    the various provided flash methods, fail).

    If the flash update fails, there is always badflash.com .
    If the chip is socketed, you can extricate yourself for
    about $30. (Less, if a local shop has a programmer you
    can use. I used to have access to a universal programmer
    at work, that could program practically anything, for
    a purchase price of around $7000.)

    The same can't be said, for the newer motherboards with
    serial flash on them. There is a seven pin header for
    re-flash, but try and find a reasonably priced flasher.
    On many boards, the eight pin DIP is soldered in. Only
    a few, bother with a socket. Many people end up sending
    the board back to the manufacturer, to get rescued. At
    least with the older boards, with 32 PLCC chip package in
    a socket, there are more options.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jul 12, 2011
    #4
  5. On 7/12/2011 9:45 AM, Paul wrote:
    > Nobody > (Revisited) wrote:
    >> On 7/11/2011 11:02 PM, Paul wrote:
    >>
    >>> A BIOS update is your best bet.
    >>>
    >>> A Newegg review from 7/10/2008 says
    >>>
    >>> "Cons: Boot sequence gets confused if you mix SATA and PATA drives
    >>> when both have OSes installed. BIOS settings don't seem to
    >>> stick if you let the normal boot sequence happen. I'm sure
    >>> a BIOS update would fix the problem."
    >>>
    >>> Since the BIOS is so basic looking, that might be your only option.
    >>> You say you can access the disks in regular situations, so that
    >>> rules out hardware issues.
    >>>
    >>> Paul

    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks, that's about what I suspected.
    >>
    >> MSI uses AFUDOS as a BIOS tool (and am well acquainted with it...)
    >> The version MSI provides is ancient, goes off-screen on both CRT and
    >> LED monitors.
    >>
    >> I've always used the version supplied by the board vendor, but am
    >> wondering if using the version(s) directly off AMI's website would work.
    >>
    >> http://www.ami.com/support/bios.cfm
    >>
    >> Actually, it looks like they also have a Windows version as well.
    >> That may work better in this case, as I'm having to support this
    >> machine via TeamViewer remotely..

    >
    > As long as the BIOS chip is socketed and can be removed for
    > maintenance, go for it. If the BIOS chip is soldered in,
    > think twice (do the research, and find out how often
    > the various provided flash methods, fail).
    >
    > If the flash update fails, there is always badflash.com .
    > If the chip is socketed, you can extricate yourself for
    > about $30. (Less, if a local shop has a programmer you
    > can use. I used to have access to a universal programmer
    > at work, that could program practically anything, for
    > a purchase price of around $7000.)
    >
    > The same can't be said, for the newer motherboards with
    > serial flash on them. There is a seven pin header for
    > re-flash, but try and find a reasonably priced flasher.
    > On many boards, the eight pin DIP is soldered in. Only
    > a few, bother with a socket. Many people end up sending
    > the board back to the manufacturer, to get rescued. At
    > least with the older boards, with 32 PLCC chip package in
    > a socket, there are more options.
    >
    > Paul


    No biggie if the flash fails, never gave been all that happy with this
    mobo. The nVidea chipset on this muddaboad has never really impressed me.

    There's still some new (or NOS) AMD/ATI chipsetted AM2+ DDR2 mobos out
    there, so I can reuse the CPU and RAM.

    --
    "Shit this is it, all the pieces do fit.
    We're like that crazy old man jumping
    out of the alleyway with a baseball bat,
    saying, "Remember me motherfucker?"
    Jim “Dandy” Mangrum
     
    Nobody > (Revisited), Jul 13, 2011
    #5
    1. Advertisements

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Similar Threads
  1. bussinessmenss

    new motherboard installed, but won't boot.

    bussinessmenss, Oct 13, 2007, in forum: Motherboard General Discussion
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    1,439
    garsky
    Apr 30, 2008
  2. Paul
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,812
    sweet15
    Jul 15, 2008
  3. method

    My HP Pavilion ze4500 doesn't boot,how to fix it ?

    method, Feb 25, 2009, in forum: Motherboard General Discussion
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    2,402
    method
    Feb 25, 2009
  4. MZB
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    472
  5. jacatone

    How do P.O.S.T. cards work?

    jacatone, Apr 20, 2010, in forum: Motherboard General Discussion
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,123
    onadal
    Sep 2, 2010
  6. mm
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    684
    Gadfly
    Oct 29, 2010
  7. Mike S.

    Slipstreaming XPSP3

    Mike S., Apr 26, 2011, in forum: Dell
    Replies:
    24
    Views:
    1,522
    Mike S.
    Apr 26, 2011
Loading...