latest iTunes and the music store

Discussion in 'Apple' started by VAXman- , Jul 14, 2008.

  1. VAXman-

    VAXman- Guest

    Why does Apple insist on turning on the iTunes store with iTunes updates?

    I just installed 7.7. I now have a STORE/dowloads item in the left hand
    selection menu beneath LIBRARY and above PLAYLISTS. Despite having the
    iTunes Store disabled in Parental Preferences, I still have STORE showing.


    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"

    Copyright 2008 Brian Schenkenberger. Any publication of _this_ usenet article
    outside of usenet _must_ include its contents _in_its_entirety_ including this
    copyright notice, disclaimer and quotations.

    The citizens of our state must be free, within reason, to speak out on matters
    of public concern. So long as they state the facts implicated fairly and
    express their opinions, even in the most colorful and hyperbolic terms, their
    speech should be protected by us. -- NJ Superior Court Appellate Div. (NJSC)

    .... pejorative statements of opinion are entitled to constitutional protection
    no matter how extreme, vituperous, or vigorously expressed they may be. (NJSC)

    "Coding is _not_ a crime!" Support the EFF: http://www.eff.org
     
    VAXman- , Jul 14, 2008
    #1
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  2. They don't.
    Because you can still have store-related playlists even if access to the
    store itself is disabled. You should note that the items in that group
    that directly related to access to the store are gone when access has
    been disabled.
     
    Gregory Weston, Jul 14, 2008
    #2
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  3. VAXman-

    VAXman- Guest

    That's not the case from my experience.


    What are store-related playlists and who put them there? The only playlist
    I have is one I've titled: Streaming Radio and it maintains 4 streams to my
    radio station's various bit-rate streams.

    I don't buy music on-line -- never have and likely never will. RIAA's rules
    for broadcast require owning tangible media.

    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"

    Copyright 2008 Brian Schenkenberger. Any publication of _this_ usenet article
    outside of usenet _must_ include its contents _in_its_entirety_ including this
    copyright notice, disclaimer and quotations.

    The citizens of our state must be free, within reason, to speak out on matters
    of public concern. So long as they state the facts implicated fairly and
    express their opinions, even in the most colorful and hyperbolic terms, their
    speech should be protected by us. -- NJ Superior Court Appellate Div. (NJSC)

    .... pejorative statements of opinion are entitled to constitutional protection
    no matter how extreme, vituperous, or vigorously expressed they may be. (NJSC)

    "Coding is _not_ a crime!" Support the EFF: http://www.eff.org
     
    VAXman- , Jul 14, 2008
    #3
  4. VAXman-

    billy Guest

    That's but one of its problems. So far this morning I've had a 10.3.9
    machine lose track of its start-up disk, and a 10.4.11 machine hang at
    the 'looking for window server' (or something close to that) part of its
    restart. Which (restarting) I've learned the hard way is necessary
    after an iTunes update, to prevent users freaking out later when they
    are the ones seeing their computers not working. And, yes, on some
    other machines there've been no problems. But, that is the essence
    of buggy software, eh?

    Billy Y..
     
    billy, Jul 14, 2008
    #4
  5. Then either your installation of iTunes is malfunctioning or you're
    using a different definition of "turn on the iTunes store" than any I
    understand.
    Off the top of my head, I'm aware of 4 entries that iTunes may create in
    the "STORE" section of that list. The first, and I think the only one
    present by default, is a link to the store itself. This disappears if
    you disable access to the store.

    The second is the shopping cart. This is created when you activate
    cart-based shopping and again disappears if the store is disabled.

    The third is the list of purchased music. I *think* this is only created
    when you first download content from the store, but I wouldn't swear to
    it.

    The fourth is the downloads list which is (normally) transient. It's
    there during downloads but should disappear when you have no active
    downloads and do not have that entry selected. If you turn off access to
    the store while this entry exists, it will continue to exist until it
    would normally be destroyed per the above conditions.

    There may be ways to create other entries there.

    G
     
    Gregory Weston, Jul 14, 2008
    #5
  6. Sure, but how have you decided *which* software is buggy? It seems
    fairly non-obvious to me to associate either of the problems you
    describe with iTunes. Especially given...

    "(restarting) I've learned the hard way is necessary after an iTunes
    update,"

    In the Mac OS X era, across several machines only some of which are
    administered by me, I have never restarted after Software Update when
    the install itself didn't mandate it. If your experience is that
    installing iTunes regularly necessitates a restart, something's
    definitely up with your systems.
     
    Gregory Weston, Jul 14, 2008
    #6
  7. VAXman-

    billy Guest

    The _only_ change to the formerly correctly operating machines
    was updating iTunes. The machines involved here do not run 24
    hours a day. I come in, turn them on, watch them boot (verbose
    console mode is on in all of them) normally, then I do the update.
    Backups had already been run just before they were last shutdown.
    The restart is not being forced by the update, it's part of the
    testing I feel is necessary, because these machines are started
    up each day by their users (no air conditioning after everyone's
    gone), and my life is a lot more pleasant when that "just works."

    Billy Y..
     
    billy, Jul 14, 2008
    #7
  8. "Post hoc ergo propter hoc" doesn't count as diagnosis.
    I specifically avoided saying "forced." I said "regularly necessitates."
    And I still say that if you find that installing iTunes routinely leads
    to stability problems, there's something up with the machines in
    question.
     
    Gregory Weston, Jul 14, 2008
    #8
  9. VAXman-

    Warren Oates Guest

    Why on earth do you have a long and boring sig file that's longer than
    your messages?

    I know, I can turn it off, but I never felt the need before, and Jesus
    in a Cadillac, it sure is boring.
    --
    Why on earth do you have a long and boring sig file that's longer than your messages?

    I know, I can turn it off, but I never felt the need before, and Jesus in a Cadillac, it sure is boring.

    See how annoying it is. I could post the entire GPL 3 here if I was so inclined and you'd probably complain.
     
    Warren Oates, Jul 14, 2008
    #9
  10. VAXman-

    billy Guest

    But, restoring a "pre hoc" backup does count as a fix. Heh.
    And, the failures I'm seeing (this time..) are in the system
    software itself.
    You're welcome to your opinion. Mine is Apple is so involved dealing
    with their phones, and DRM, that they release buggy updates to both iTunes
    and Quicktime. For example, I filed bug report #5678944 on 9-Jan-2008.
    The problem was (apparently inadvertantly) resolved in a release less than
    a week later, but, that broke some other things. Then, _four months_ later
    I received a response from Apple saying the original and fixed problem is
    is currently being investigated. Were it not for NDAs, I'd be including
    plenty of material to make my point here... Some of these problems are
    really basic, like undefined symbols that anyone (particularly the person
    who built the release) should have noticed. Others, like the one I just
    had this morning, are harder for me to pin down. If I have the time, I
    will be giving that a shot, though. Generally with this sort of thing
    it's easier to just wait for the next release, and see what happens then.

    Billy Y..
     
    billy, Jul 15, 2008
    #10
  11. VAXman-

    VAXman- Guest

    Spend 14 years in the courts, then tell me its boring.

    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"

    Copyright 2008 Brian Schenkenberger. Any publication of _this_ usenet article
    outside of usenet _must_ include its contents _in_its_entirety_ including this
    copyright notice, disclaimer and quotations.

    The citizens of our state must be free, within reason, to speak out on matters
    of public concern. So long as they state the facts implicated fairly and
    express their opinions, even in the most colorful and hyperbolic terms, their
    speech should be protected by us. -- NJ Superior Court Appellate Div. (NJSC)

    .... pejorative statements of opinion are entitled to constitutional protection
    no matter how extreme, vituperous, or vigorously expressed they may be. (NJSC)

    "Coding is _not_ a crime!" Support the EFF: http://www.eff.org
     
    VAXman- , Jul 15, 2008
    #11
  12. It is a violation of netiquette. Four lines, max.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Jul 15, 2008
    #12
  13. Or you're just masking the most visible symptom.
    So have you confirmed the problems you're seeing in any installation
    where you aren't an administrator?

    G
     
    Gregory Weston, Jul 15, 2008
    #13
  14. YAWN.
     
    Dave Balderstone, Jul 15, 2008
    #14
  15. VAXman-

    billy Guest

    This particular time I haven't looked anywhere other than Usenet, but
    in the past I've seen them mentioned in Apple's discussion groups and
    various other Mac sites.

    iTunes is used by some of the people in my work, but the 7.7 update
    doesn't add anything they need, so I haven't spent much time digging
    for info yet.

    Billy Y..
     
    billy, Jul 15, 2008
    #15
  16. VAXman-

    Warren Oates Guest

    I don't think that's his name.
     
    Warren Oates, Jul 15, 2008
    #16
  17. I don't think that's his name.[/QUOTE]

    Ha ha.

    I had to read it three times before getting the joke. It's too early in
    the morning.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Jul 15, 2008
    #17
  18. VAXman-

    VAXman- Guest

    Netiquette isn't law; the First Amendment is... or it was.

    It's people like me taking this shit through the courts so that people like
    you can exercise your "rights" to voice your opinion about what you believe
    on usenet/internet.

    So, if you don't like my .sig, sue me. I don't like the big .sig either;
    however, the bastard that filed suit against me seems to forget that there
    is a freedom of speech and expression in the US. The citations in the .sig
    are there to remind the judges that prior case law prohibits such lawsuits
    which have been termed SLAPPs.

    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"

    Copyright 2008 Brian Schenkenberger. Any publication of _this_ usenet article
    outside of usenet _must_ include its contents _in_its_entirety_ including this
    copyright notice, disclaimer and quotations.

    The citizens of our state must be free, within reason, to speak out on matters
    of public concern. So long as they state the facts implicated fairly and
    express their opinions, even in the most colorful and hyperbolic terms, their
    speech should be protected by us. -- NJ Superior Court Appellate Div. (NJSC)

    .... pejorative statements of opinion are entitled to constitutional protection
    no matter how extreme, vituperous, or vigorously expressed they may be. (NJSC)

    "Coding is _not_ a crime!" Support the EFF: http://www.eff.org
     
    VAXman- , Jul 15, 2008
    #18
  19. Do you really think that the judges are reading your usenet messages?

    Do you realize that "free speech" applies only to governmental actions
    that attempt to restrict free speech?

    If someone sued you about something that you wrote or said, that's a
    libel or slander suit, and does not fall under the purview of the first
    amendment because it is a matter between people, not between the
    government and a person.

    I suspect that you did not do well in the "gets along with others"
    category in elementary school.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Jul 15, 2008
    #19
  20. VAXman-

    VAXman- Guest

    You are naive. In an action, the original content would be cited and
    referenced in exhibit.

    Do you realize you are wrong? The 2 quotes in the signature come from
    case law civil defamation suits between non-government entities (i.e.
    individual citizens).

    Why don't you take the time to read the comment about "pejorative state-
    ments" instead of playing high and mighty netcop?

    My "elementary" schooling was long before such nonsense permeated the
    sensibilities of the US educational system. I've no problem "getting
    along with others", it's others that seem to feel that their position
    in the chain of being is more highly valued than others.

    I still haven't read a reasonable response as to why iTunes insists on
    enabling the iTunes Store save for one reply which was rather tongue-
    in-cheek and probably the most sensible answer I'll get here.

    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"

    Copyright 2008 Brian Schenkenberger. Any publication of _this_ usenet article
    outside of usenet _must_ include its contents _in_its_entirety_ including this
    copyright notice, disclaimer and quotations.

    The citizens of our state must be free, within reason, to speak out on matters
    of public concern. So long as they state the facts implicated fairly and
    express their opinions, even in the most colorful and hyperbolic terms, their
    speech should be protected by us. -- NJ Superior Court Appellate Div. (NJSC)

    .... pejorative statements of opinion are entitled to constitutional protection
    no matter how extreme, vituperous, or vigorously expressed they may be. (NJSC)

    "Coding is _not_ a crime!" Support the EFF: http://www.eff.org
     
    VAXman- , Jul 15, 2008
    #20
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