Loud POP !.....then nothing

Discussion in 'Abit' started by blewyn, Dec 9, 2003.

  1. blewyn

    blewyn Guest

    What does it mean when your PC goes POP and then goes dead, not even
    the PSU fan working ?

    Fingers crossed it's the PSU not the mobo....

    :-(

    Blewyn
     
    blewyn, Dec 9, 2003
    #1
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  2. Chances are it's a blown capacitor.
    Could be either one.
    If there is no visual damage on the mobo, then it's probably the PSU.
     
    Jens C. Hansen [Odense], Dec 9, 2003
    #2
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  3. blewyn

    TomG Guest

    I'd be starting by pulling the PS and trying to detect an odor of burnt
    components coming from the PS... but that is about the hardest working
    device in a system especially if the PS is a lower wattage (sorry, 300 watts
    is low nowadays with all the power sucking devices we run).

    --

    Thomas Geery
    Network+ certified

    ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    over 120,000 FTP users served!
    ^^^^^^^
     
    TomG, Dec 9, 2003
    #3
  4. blewyn

    GlassVial Guest

    I'll agree with the other posters... a POP *generally* means power
    supply...was the first thing I thought of just by reading the header.
    Power supplies are generally cheap now, you should be able to get a
    decent one for, say, under $40 (retail) depending on what wattage
    you're talking about. I'd still open the case up (obviously) check
    the board for any blown caps, and burn marks near the p/s connector.
    -GV
     
    GlassVial, Dec 9, 2003
    #4
  5. blewyn

    jeffc Guest

    Khewel!
     
    jeffc, Dec 9, 2003
    #5
  6. blewyn

    Homie Guest

    Check the ATX supply first, then check the pictures on my web page.

    Homie

    --
    Mainboards, Videocards & CPU pin repair.

    http://motherboardrepair.com


    What does it mean when your PC goes POP and then goes dead, not even
    the PSU fan working ?

    Fingers crossed it's the PSU not the mobo....

    :-(

    Blewyn
     
    Homie, Dec 9, 2003
    #6
  7. blewyn

    blewyn Guest

    Thanks for your replies chaps/chapesses. I got myself a 400W
    (allegedly) PSU last night for 70SR (about $20) and it did exactly the
    same thing - worked OK for a while (although the picture was
    washed-out in desktop mode and dark in 3D mode) then POPped and went
    dead during a stress test - in this case during 'Nature' halfway
    through 3DMark2001. I'm a bit suspicious that I was sold a 300W PSU
    marked 400W, but before I go somewhere else to buy another I was
    wondering if it could be down to power spikes ? ie do I need a
    power-smoother thingy ? The back of the PSU was hot, with a very faint
    odour. I'm running :

    Retail AMD XP2000 w/AMD fan/heatsink etc
    Creative FX5950 Ultra
    Abit KG7-RAID
    2xMaxtor HDs
    Creative Audigy Player

    Surely a 400W PSU should cope with this little lot ? I'm going to add
    another HD very soon - will 400W be enough ?

    Cheers,

    Blewyn
     
    blewyn, Dec 10, 2003
    #7
  8. Must be. I have a KT7 with XP2400 @ 2222 MHz, 2x HD, 5 fans, GF4

    My PSU = 350 watt.

    Be sure you buy a good brand PSU. Cheap PSU's are mostly over rated or have
    not the correct load on either the 12v or 5v rail.

    E.g. if your PSU is 400 Watt, this power is shared over the 12v and 5v rail.
    If the 5v rail is to weak you can blow it.


    Some info:

    http://www.tech-report.com/reviews/2003q3/psus/index.x?pg=1


    Regards,

    Mike.
     
    Alice in Chains, Dec 10, 2003
    #8
  9. blewyn

    Skid Guest

    By all means get a good UPS, not just a cheap power strip. Blowing two power
    supplies back to back could mean you are buying lousy psus, but it could
    also indicate a problem with spikes and dips in your wiring. You should also
    take a really good look for shorts, making sure the board doesn't touch the
    case anywhere except the standoffs, etc. At this point you're lucky nothing
    else has gone up in smoke.
     
    Skid, Dec 10, 2003
    #9
  10. blewyn

    TomG Guest

    get yourself a BRAND NAME (such as Antec) 400+ watt power supply. I have
    had excellent results with the Antec Truepower True480 which is a 480 watt
    PS. There are other good brand names out there as well.

    --

    Thomas Geery
    Network+ certified

    ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    over 120,000 FTP users served!
    ^^^^^^^
     
    TomG, Dec 10, 2003
    #10
  11. blewyn

    s f j cody Guest

    Hmmm. My 350Watt PSU seems to cope OK with this lot:

    Abit KX7-333R mboard
    AMD XP1800 w. standard hsink/fan
    Geforce 3 ti200
    3 case fans
    4 7200rpm HDs (2 WD, 1 IBM, 1 Quantum)
    Soundblaster live
    Cold cathode lighting
    TV card

    I will shortly be upgrading to an XP2600. Should I be considering a 400W
    PSU?
     
    s f j cody, Dec 10, 2003
    #11
  12. blewyn

    Skid Guest

    There's no magic formula, it's a quality thing. A good 350 is better than a
    poor 400. My advice is to keep what you have until you have a problem -- but
    when you do, the power supply is one of the first things to check.
     
    Skid, Dec 10, 2003
    #12
  13. blewyn

    John Lewis Guest

    You might want to inspect your video board very carefully indeed.

    Access to a Hall-effect current meter to check the currents in the
    PS feeds to the mother-board and video board would be very useful,
    just turning on the power-supply for brief intervals.

    Did you have any other odd symptoms before the second power-supply
    blew ? Were all your HDs, CD/DVD, floppy drives working normally ?

    PC Power-supplies seldom blow up. They normally have both over-voltage
    and fold-back current limits that protect both PS and other circuitry
    If you get a quality name-brand replacement, make sure that you get
    one that can deliver at least 15amps from +12 volts. Both the CPU and
    the 5950 video card are power-hogs on the 12 Volt supply.

    When you try again, turn on the 5950 GPU temp monitor and leave the
    case open. Also run Hardware Monitor or similar MB temp monitor.
    Watch, smell and feel for any signs of heat-distress, power-supply, MB
    or video card. The GPU temp should not exceed 75 degrees
    C............regardless of the stupid 125 or 145 limit in the current
    version of the driver. Do not leave the computer unattended until
    you are absolutely certain that there is no heat distress after
    running your most intense applications. If only the power-supply
    is distressed, allow PS to cool, remove all periphs from the MB,
    and add periphs one at a time until the culprit is found, starting
    with the video card.

    Youy may find that with a name-brand PS replacement, your computer
    fails to fire up or shuts down some time after power-up. It may be
    that the better internal protection detects the overload and shuts
    down before any damage. You should hear occasional ticks from the
    power-supply whenever the protection circuitry attempts to re-cycle.
    If so, remove all peripheral and try with MB alone, then replace
    periphs one by one until the culprit is found.

    Is this a system-build from scratch ? Or is the PS failure associated
    with recently replacing any item ( e.g: 5950 ) ?

    John Lewis
     
    John Lewis, Dec 10, 2003
    #13
  14. blewyn

    Leon Smith Guest

    I'm running an Athlon 1.4ghz, GF4 Ti4200, 2 hd's, 2 cd's, about 5 additional
    80mm case fans, a fan bus and cathode tube from the 235 watt psu that came
    with my 3 year old In-Win Q500 full tower case. Completely stable.

    I guess it's the modern processors which are tipping the wattage scales.

    I wouldn't upgrade unless you notice problems.
     
    Leon Smith, Dec 11, 2003
    #14
  15. blewyn

    VIC Guest

    I recall a thing about "BUY CHEAP, GET CHEAP". I can't understand so
    much ignorance regarding the NEED of a GOOD PSU. Man it's the
    foundation of the box. And the problems a poor cheap one can create,
    wow!
     
    VIC, Dec 12, 2003
    #15
  16. blewyn

    JD Guest

    Vic,
    I can understand the "ignorance". I've been using PCs and networks since
    the early eighties. As the networks were in Banks they were large. In
    all that time I never had a PSU problem until about the last twelve
    months. Since then I've had three fail. One just stopped working and the
    other two went 'pop'. Opening them revealed at least one capacitor in
    shreds. I believe that the capacitor issues that caused Abit so much
    grief over the last few years (the BX133 MB mostly) are just a symptom
    of a wider problem. Either the latest equipment is demanding much
    cleaner power to a finer tolerance or the PSU/Case manufacturers are
    shaving every last nickel and dime and buying the absolute cheapest PSU
    components. So that's where the problem stems from. For a long time the
    PSU was never an issue. Now it is becoming more and more so.

    Just my 2Cents!
    Jim
     
    JD, Dec 12, 2003
    #16
  17. blewyn

    wes Guest

    Stay FAR away from DEER powersupplys. They have a bad fault in
    popping one of the filter caps after the full wave bridge rectifier
    which allows full voltage to pass through to your computer components.
    I fried over 15 systems (at work) before determining what the problem
    was with the DEER ps. I recommend you get a 400W ANTEC ps. They have
    worked wonderfully for me over the years.
    The popping sound is more than likely a power supply capacitor. pull
    apart the ps after you replace it and look around inside, you will
    find what looks like paper or small cardboard parts, which is whats
    left of the electrolitic cap.
    as the previous poster stated, your lucky that so far thats the only
    thing getting damaged on your system.
     
    wes, Dec 12, 2003
    #17
  18. blewyn

    blewyn Guest

    John,

    Thanks for your reply. The power problems have indeed started after
    installing the 5950, no problems at all beforehand. Having said that,
    all the PSU's I have so far tested have been non-brand cheap units
    (brand names simply not available here in Saudi Arabia).

    I got myself another 400W PSU a couple of days ago and switched the PC
    on without using any 3D games or demos for an hour or so. Then I
    played Halo at 800x600, Tron2 at 1024x768, ran 3DMark2003 at 1024x768,
    then went back to Halo at 1024x768 about 3 hrs on and it lasted maybe
    5 mins and blew again. Do you think the problem is in the card, or is
    it simply a case of crappy PSU and spiky power supply ?

    Cheers,

    Blewyn
     
    blewyn, Dec 13, 2003
    #18
  19. blewyn

    blewyn Guest

    I had an XP2000 with 3 HDs and 4 fans with 350W PSU when I had my GF4.
    I think the 5950 is the problem. Thanks for the info link.

    Cheers,

    Blewyn
     
    blewyn, Dec 13, 2003
    #19
  20. blewyn

    blewyn Guest

    Good point, thanks.

    Blewyn
     
    blewyn, Dec 13, 2003
    #20
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