Mac Friendly Router (DHCP) & firewall?

Discussion in 'Apple' started by DaveC, Oct 23, 2003.

  1. DaveC

    DaveC Guest

    What routers/firewalls support Macintosh? I know that most of them are now
    web-browser configurable, but I'd also like to know what companies that
    manufacture these products *officially* support Macs.

    Also, what's your experience regarding how well you're treated by support
    departments when you call (regardless if you're using a Mac...)

    Thanks,
     
    DaveC, Oct 23, 2003
    #1
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  2. The Belkin router; it has Mac instructions in the box and is sold at
    the Apple stores.
    I've never had to call them; I've had the router since Jan 2002.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Oct 23, 2003
    #2
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  3. DaveC

    Jack B Guest

    FWIW, I've used:

    Hawking Technologies, worked good for a few years but died, never
    claimed to work with Mac, but I always used a network of Mac OS X,
    Windows, and BSD. Support was very poor, and techs had trouble with
    English language (unfortunately that's the only one I'm fluent in).
    Only problem was firmware update, which support said had to be done via
    Windows; actually I think I could have done it w/TFTP.

    D-Link (DI-604), no problems at all, they specify Mac support. Retired
    in favor of wireless below. Never used support services. Firmware
    update went ok.

    Linksys (WRT54G), no problems at all, no Mac support claimed. Using it
    now and I'm satisfied. Haven't used support services. Firmware update
    went ok.
     
    Jack B, Oct 23, 2003
    #3
  4. DaveC

    John Heaney Guest

    Asante.
     
    John Heaney, Oct 23, 2003
    #4
  5. DaveC

    GRGAUD Guest

    [GR] I've been using a D-Link DI704P and it's jim dandy with Mac OS 9
    and OS X. It's configurable via your browser, but make sure your browser
    will allow pop-up windows. This router has a built-in firewall. very
    nice and inexpensive, but not wireless.
     
    GRGAUD, Oct 23, 2003
    #5
  6. DaveC

    Dan Cottler Guest

    If you want a real Mac solution: build your own, using a used Mac and
    IPNetRouter and IPNetSentry. (I like PowerMac 7300 systems for this)
    That combo makes for a kick-ass fast reliable router and full function
    firewall... AND there's enuf umph left on the Mac to also use it as a
    home file/ftp/web server.

    Details at http://www.sustworks.com/
    ObDisclaimer: I'm a Sustworks reseller. Good prices! :)


    Of the off-the-shelf boxed NAT routers, I'm not sure if any officially
    support Macs, except Apple's Airport. They all work tho, but some are
    better than others. Note that the "firewall" included in these routers
    are actually just simple/minimalistic ip:protocol based packet filters.

    If your connection is faster than 2 Mbps, stay away from LinkSys.
    They're grossly underpowered; too easy to swamp out if you have more
    than one computer cranking away.

    And currently, I'm not fond of Netgear routers. Netgear released some
    buggy "firmware" a while back - then didn't make any real effort to
    announce the bugs or that a fix was available. I've seen a lot of
    people on Comcast's support forums screwed by this.

    FWIW,
    - Dan.
     
    Dan Cottler, Oct 23, 2003
    #6
  7. Asante's do, for one.
     
    Roland Hutchinson, Oct 23, 2003
    #7
  8. I haven't used it.
    Customer Support didn't seem to even read my email to them.

    However, the interface for configuration -- and especially the log --
    will help diagnose and solve problems if you pay attention to it.

    Highly recommended, especially over LinkSys and NetGear.
    Customer Support is insane. Oh, they try, and they try hard, and
    sometimes they even have suggestions for you. But they don't seem to
    really understand what they're doing.

    NetGear: No Mac support claimed (that I ever saw). Very poor
    performance, with lots of dropped packets. On the plus side, had a RS232
    interface for configuring *in addition to* the web interface. Very handy
    when you configure yourself into a corner. :) Customer support's only
    suggestion was "try a different firmware revision."

    Neither the NetGear nor Linksys ever died, I just got tired of dealing
    with them and their technical support.
     
    Steven Fisher, Oct 23, 2003
    #8
  9. Actually, Safari will work; you have to explicitly add the port number
    to get it to work. I.e., <http://192.168.2.1:88>

    --Michelle
     
    Michelle Steiner, Oct 23, 2003
    #9
  10. IPNetRouter is an excellent piece of software and served me quite well
    but I don't know that I'd recommend it as a solution at this time. It's
    almost necessarily less stable than a dedicated router and more
    expensive to run if it's not also a machine that sees regular use. Even
    without anything resembling Mac support, I don't regret moving from IPNR
    to a LinkSys device for a second.
    This has very distinctly not been my experience.

    G
     
    Gregory Weston, Oct 23, 2003
    #10
  11. DaveC

    Hugh Wolf Guest

    ["Followup-To:" header set to comp.sys.mac.comm.]
    Probably true, but then routers should be platform independent
    anyway.


    Which Netgear model are you referring to? The RT314 I've been using
    for quite some time is very robust and easily a good enough performer
    for my 1.7Mbps cable modem. Maybe it wouldn't hold up at faster
    speeds, I don't know. This is an old model, I don't think they sell
    it anymore. It's still running the firmware it shipped with.

    And, yes, the rs232 jack _is_ pretty handy in some circumstances :)
    But I had a to buy a usb->serial converter to access it.
     
    Hugh Wolf, Oct 23, 2003
    #11
  12. DaveC

    Bev A. Kupf Guest

    Which particular model? I haven't seen this with the RT314 or the
    MR314.

    Bev
     
    Bev A. Kupf, Oct 24, 2003
    #12
  13. DaveC

    Bev A. Kupf Guest

    Echo the sentiments. This is a well-constructed unit, that is also
    very competitively priced.

    Bev
     
    Bev A. Kupf, Oct 24, 2003
    #13
  14. Its been almost 3 years for my Asante FR300x router with a print server
    and modem port and I've never had any problems with it. Instead of
    getting a new wireless router when I upgraded to an ibook with an
    airport card I got a wireless access point and added that onto the
    Asante. It simply works.

    larry
     
    Larry C. Lyons, Oct 25, 2003
    #14
  15. DaveC

    seaside Guest

    I would wait a bit.

    I expect to appear some Rendezvous enabled router,
    which my simplify configuration.

    Am 25.10.2003 15:47 Uhr schrieb "Larry C. Lyons" unter
     
    seaside, Oct 26, 2003
    #15
  16. RT314. I did a few searches at the time and found it was a fairly common
    problem with outgoing UDP.

    The RT314 had similiar problems with TCP, but since TCP has error
    correction it's never noticed.

    It may have been a firmware problem rather than a hardware one. I gave
    up on it after a while.
     
    Steven Fisher, Oct 26, 2003
    #16
  17. I'll second that emotion. My Linksys was cheap, and it has worked well
    since I got it. You have to learn a little networking to make it go,
    because there is no support.
    They might be kind of weak, I think I might be overloading it right
    now, but who cares? I don't need a huge contraption to hook a few
    computers together. A linux box or a Mac with two ethernet cards would
    work, but how easy would it be to put wireless on one?
     
    Timothy Domst, Oct 27, 2003
    #17
  18. DaveC

    Bev A. Kupf Guest

    Linux - very easy -- there are HOWTOs available on the subject. Mac - I
    imagine fairly easy as well, especially with OS X, although I haven't done
    it.

    Bev
     
    Bev A. Kupf, Oct 27, 2003
    #18
  19. Don't get me wrong, it's a good idea for some configurations, but a
    computer that has two slots for ethernet cards and another for wireless
    is going to draw a lot more power than a router, and have fan noise,
    etc.

    --
     
    Timothy Domst, Oct 28, 2003
    #19
  20. DaveC

    Bev A. Kupf Guest

    Oh, I completely agree with you. But there are some situations
    where a computer with a wireless card, and two ethernet cards is more
    useful than a wireless router .....

    beverly
     
    Bev A. Kupf, Oct 29, 2003
    #20
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