MacLINUX

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Fred McKenzie, Jan 17, 2014.

  1. This is an excellent business opportunity. Port the Linux tools for
    Rassberry Pi development to MacOS and sell them through the Mac Store.
    That way you'll be doing your Rassberry Pi development, you'll have
    working tools, and you might be making some money.

    Installing Linux on a Mac directly is a non-starter. It can run in
    VirtualBox (free), Fusion or Parallels ($80). Or port the tools to
    MacOS. Time to move on.
     
    Michael Vilain, Jan 20, 2014
    #21
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  2. It really isn't that bad. Admittedly it wasn't crystal clear how to
    do everything, but it took me about an hour, and if I'd had the good
    sense to take notes, I could have written a page of instructions making
    it easy for anyone else.

    Likely others have done this (written the instructions).
     
    Doug Anderson, Jan 20, 2014
    #22
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  3. The instructions you posted say they don't work with all Mac models.
    Which tells me that maybe the boot code is hardware specific and needs
    to be tweeked depending on the Mac model.

    Doing specific partitioning and whatnot isn't really that much of a
    problem, but I wonder if the OP can cope with that?
     
    Michael Vilain, Jan 20, 2014
    #23
  4. Certainly one has to make sure that rEFIt (or rEFInd, which is the
    other alternative) works on one's hardware.

    I presume someone who is playing with a Pi is up to that.
    Certainly it would be useful to have a good set of instructions for
    doing that.

    At work we had a server crash in early October. I'm not in the
    computer support business, but it became clear that our support people
    were not going to put a critical system back together in a timely way.

    I took a three-year old spare iMac, and in about 4 hours, got it dual
    booting OS X/Ubuntu Linux, installed our server software on it, transferred
    the data from backup, and got it running (on a dynamic IP number, but
    at least usably).

    It ran under heavy use without a hiccup for about 10 weeks until there
    was a lull and we could move it to another machine.

    So I resist the idea that installing Linux directly on Apple hardware
    is prohibitively difficult, though it isn't a job for someone who
    knows nothing besides office software.
     
    Doug Anderson, Jan 20, 2014
    #24
  5. It really isn't that bad. Admittedly it wasn't crystal clear how to
    do everything, but it took me about an hour, and if I'd had the good
    sense to take notes, I could have written a page of instructions making
    it easy for anyone else.

    Likely others have done this (written the instructions).[/QUOTE]

    I'm not exactly the one only familiar with office software, but not too
    far behind! If I hadn't moved up from TRSDOS and CP/M to a Mac 512, I
    might not be having any trouble with LINUX!

    The websites I've found with instructions, seem to all be either
    referring to using a virtual machine or partitioning a Mac's (only) HD.
    Definitely not installing LINUX to a fourth hard drive.

    Even the rEFIt program appears to be geared to working with HD number
    one and maybe two. In my early trials, I noticed it only listed
    partition data on two of my four drives. I assume the terminal command
    used to activate it (sudo /efi/rEFIt/enable.sh) operates on the booted
    OS X drive, not necessarily the fourth drive with LINUX installed. I'm
    not smart enough to adjust the command to work on a different drive.

    So I figured rather than fight it, I'd join the crowd. I partitioned
    the 500 GB HD with 100 GB and 400 GB partitions. I then deleted the 400
    GB partition and installed OS X on the other.

    I installed from a Debian Live 7.2 AMD64 Gnome DVD, choosing the
    "largest free space" option. The only adjustment I made to the
    suggested partition scheme was to set the boot flag on the / partition.

    To get it to work, it was necessary to set HD4 as the default startup
    drive and re-install rEFIt. I issued the terminal command from HD4 to
    activate it, and used the rEFIt partition utility to "fix" the
    partitions.

    Still it took several reboots before everything worked. Using rEFIt
    during the boot process did not help. Eventually, holding down the
    option key during booting let me select one of two "windows" drives that
    appeared. One did not work, but the other did! (I take it the two
    LINUX partitions show up as two separate drives.)

    So Debian works now. But it does not look much like Raspbian!

    Fred
     
    Fred McKenzie, Jan 20, 2014
    #25
  6. I'm not exactly the one only familiar with office software, but not too
    far behind! If I hadn't moved up from TRSDOS and CP/M to a Mac 512, I
    might not be having any trouble with LINUX!

    The websites I've found with instructions, seem to all be either
    referring to using a virtual machine or partitioning a Mac's (only) HD.
    Definitely not installing LINUX to a fourth hard drive.

    Even the rEFIt program appears to be geared to working with HD number
    one and maybe two. In my early trials, I noticed it only listed
    partition data on two of my four drives. I assume the terminal command
    used to activate it (sudo /efi/rEFIt/enable.sh) operates on the booted
    OS X drive, not necessarily the fourth drive with LINUX installed. I'm
    not smart enough to adjust the command to work on a different drive.

    So I figured rather than fight it, I'd join the crowd. I partitioned
    the 500 GB HD with 100 GB and 400 GB partitions. I then deleted the 400
    GB partition and installed OS X on the other.

    I installed from a Debian Live 7.2 AMD64 Gnome DVD, choosing the
    "largest free space" option. The only adjustment I made to the
    suggested partition scheme was to set the boot flag on the / partition.

    To get it to work, it was necessary to set HD4 as the default startup
    drive and re-install rEFIt. I issued the terminal command from HD4 to
    activate it, and used the rEFIt partition utility to "fix" the
    partitions.

    Still it took several reboots before everything worked. Using rEFIt
    during the boot process did not help. Eventually, holding down the
    option key during booting let me select one of two "windows" drives that
    appeared. One did not work, but the other did! (I take it the two
    LINUX partitions show up as two separate drives.)

    So Debian works now. But it does not look much like Raspbian![/QUOTE]

    It looks a lot like it at the system level: the filesystem, the
    shell, the utility programs, etc.

    The Gnome GUI might be very different looking than the GUI you have on
    Raspbian (or you may not have a GUI on Raspbian).
     
    Doug Anderson, Jan 21, 2014
    #26
  7. I replaced Gnome with LXDE, and it has a simpler desktop. It is
    probably as close as I will get to Raspbian on a Mac.

    Fred
     
    Fred McKenzie, Jan 21, 2014
    #27
  8. So he can learn how to use Raspbian in a less constrained environment.

    I'm not saying this is a good way of doing that - I don't know enough
    about Raspbian to know.
     
    Doug Anderson, Jan 21, 2014
    #28
  9. Well, just for starters, you may not have room to install your
    favorite web browser (depending on what that is) so as you program and
    run into questions, you might be frustrated by the process of getting
    them answered.

    Plus the machine is slow, so it takes longer to find out things don't
    work.

    And, if like me you are an emacs guy, you might find the mouse
    capabilities of the version of emacs that Raspbian runs are
    frustrating.

    Then there is the question of things like software develepment tools.
    As you are programming, it could be nice to be doing it on a full
    computer with lots of tools, only importing the finished product to
    Raspbian.

    Etc. There are really a lot of reasons why one might want to
    experience a similar operating system running on a proper computer
    before plunging yourself into an environment with haveily limited
    speed, memory and storage space.
    Yes, probably. It isn't what I'd do, I expect, but I come from a
    place of already having some unix familiarity.
     
    Doug Anderson, Jan 21, 2014
    #29
  10. Of course.
    I have no idea - I haven't done development on Raspbian. It is a
    basically open source amateur stuff. That doesn't mean these tools
    don't exist, but it wouldn't shock me if the development tool suite
    for Raspbian didn't measure up to that for Android, iOS, Windows CE,
    or other mainstream commercially successful platforms.
     
    Doug Anderson, Jan 21, 2014
    #30
  11. I had a similar discussion with a sysadmin client. He bought a Rasberry
    Pi solely to run DNS and LDAP for his home network. They are low
    overhead services and it should be fine for that. I originally mixed the
    function of an Arduino board with a Rasberry Pi and finally got them
    sorted out. You mention embedded systems and I picture an Arduino while
    a Rasberry Pi is a full-fledged system capable of running Linux and a
    bunch of stuff, albeit slowly.
     
    Michael Vilain, Jan 22, 2014
    #31
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