Mighty Mouse - design flaw or faulty unit?

Discussion in 'Apple' started by unfrostedpoptart, Aug 3, 2005.

  1. Well, I went over to the Apple store at lunch and tried the one system
    with the Mighty Mouse they had (dual G5 with 30" monitor!). As a
    reference, I've used one-button, two-button, three-button, wheel mice,
    trackballs, stylii, and lightpens on PCs, Macs, Amigas, and Sun
    Workstations. For a few years I've been using a Wacom Graphire tablet
    with their wireless three-button wheel mouse with PC/WinXP and
    Mac/Tiger. Oh - and I use it left-handed, just to add a twist.

    Anway, I thought it was generally comfortable. Being left-handed, I
    like the symmetrical design. The mini-trackball seemed too small, but
    I think I could get used to it. I even thought the side switch (thumb
    side) worked fine. However... either the mouse I was trying it messed
    up or they blew the design, big time. I could not get right-clicking
    to work at first. I kept trying and checked the control panel. Then I
    had it work a couple of times but couldn't get it again. Finally, I
    figured it out! It only worked if the only place I was touching the
    mouse was the top, right side. If I rested a finger where the left
    button would be or rested my palm on the lower half of the mouse,
    right-click would not work. So, was it just this unit or do they all
    work that way? I hope not - that would be horrible design and create
    lots of finger/hand tension. Finally, they really need to get the
    bluetooth model out!

    David
     
    unfrostedpoptart, Aug 3, 2005
    #1
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  2. Agreed.

    If they make a bluetooth model, I'm there.

    It may be the closest I can expect to get to a Bluetooth trackball
    (assuming that little pea-shaped thing on the MM can be used as a true
    trackball).
     
    Keeper of the Purple Twilight, Aug 3, 2005
    #2
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  3. unfrostedpoptart

    clvrmnky Guest

    On 03/08/2005 4:21 PM, unfrostedpoptart wrote:
    [...]
    Probably by design. At least one reviewer (ars technica) has mentioned
    that if you push both buttons, it's the same as a default click.
     
    clvrmnky, Aug 3, 2005
    #3
  4. unfrostedpoptart

    Mathue Guest

    It behaves much like a trackball, 'like' a trackball. I teied it out
    at the Pleasanton, CA Apple store. I sorta liked it. However, my
    current MS mouse is only 8 months old so unless I get it as a gift the
    current critter is staying.
     
    Mathue, Aug 5, 2005
    #4
  5. Damn - this is confirmed (in intricate, gory detail) on this page where
    they dissected the mouse:
    http://arstechnica.com/articles/paedia/hardware/dissect.ars.
    Summary: there are touch sensors on the left and right sides of the
    mouse shell. If the mouse senses any contact on the left side while the
    mouse is clicked, it assumes a left-click. If no contact, it assumes
    right-click. So stupid. I know I won't be buying one. I'm sure
    within a few months there will be copy-cat (no pun intended) mice with
    the mini trackball, but real buttons. And WinXP drivers.

    David
     
    unfrostedpoptart, Aug 5, 2005
    #5
  6. unfrostedpoptart

    John Heaney Guest

    Well, stupid is a judgement call. I'm sure they spent lots of money and
    tested it with lots of users in determining the best behavior. It
    probably makes a great deal of sense for users of the current one button
    mouse because these people are used to the whole mouse being one button.
    Then the right click becomes unambiguous. My guess is that it eliminates
    more false clicks than doing it any other way.

    The article suggests, though, that this behavior is implemented in the
    mouse itself, making the right button sensor unnecessary. I would think
    that having the right sensor in there would allow a user to switch
    between a right hand and left hand orientation, but it doesn't seem like
    they have done that. It looks like the hardware is in place to reverse
    the logic of the click behavior or even to allow a chordal virtual
    button click, but they decided not to take advantage of it.

    It's not clear to me what exactly the software they used for testing is
    looking at. I wonder, for example, if snooping the usb data would reveal
    separate information from the two sensors. Maybe this is really a driver
    issue.
     
    John Heaney, Aug 5, 2005
    #6
  7. unfrostedpoptart

    Simon Slavin Guest

    It can't.

    Simon.
     
    Simon Slavin, Aug 5, 2005
    #7
  8. Damn.

    Oh well, then I'll repeat:

    Where the FRELL are the true Bluetooth trackballs?

    (And just in case anyone cares to mention 'The Ball' by DVForge...forget
    it.)
     
    Keeper of the Purple Twilight, Aug 6, 2005
    #8
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