Mountain Lion's cost

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Michelle Steiner, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. Based on the cost of Snow Leopard and of Lion, and the degree of change
    from Leopard to Snow Leopard or Snow Leopard to Lion, I can't see Apple
    charging more than $10 or $15 for Mountain Lion if you have Lion already.
    And for those who are still running Snow Leopard, I see a price of $39 or
    so, which would be the cost of Lion and Mountain Lion combined.

    I think those prices would be reasonable, but ML will probably be the same
    $39.99 that Lion was.

    On a related subject, my iMac is almost six years old as a model (but the
    machine itself is about five years old), so I was planning to buy the next
    model of iMac, which I expect to be released in April or May. Maybe I'll
    wait until ML is released, though, so I can buy the iMac with ML already
    installed and save the few bucks for the upgrade. Indications are that my
    computer (late 2006 iMac) won't run ML.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 19, 2012
    #1
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  2. Michelle Steiner

    Alan Browne Guest

    I'd wait unless you have some pressing need.

    As to price, sheesh, Lion just came out. The update should be no more
    than $4.99.

    Maybe Apple should just lease us the OS at so much per year.
     
    Alan Browne, Feb 20, 2012
    #2
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  3. shhhhhh
     
    Howard S Shubs, Feb 20, 2012
    #3
  4. I'd wait unless you have some pressing need.[/QUOTE]

    My advise to others is to wait until you can't wait any longer. That way,
    if a new machine comes out the next day, you'll know that you couldn't have
    waited even one more day.

    But sometimes, wants supersede needs. :)
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 20, 2012
    #4
  5. Don't you mean "advice?" Advise is a verb, advice is a noun.
     
    Chance Furlong, Feb 20, 2012
    #5
  6. Don't you mean "advice?" Advise is a verb, advice is a noun.[/QUOTE]

    Can't you recognize a typographical error when you see one? BTW, you should
    have used a semicolon instead of a comma in the second sentence.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 20, 2012
    #6
  7. Michelle Steiner

    Fred Moore Guest

    Can't you recognize a typographical error when you see one? BTW, you should
    have used a semicolon instead of a comma in the second sentence.[/QUOTE]

    Ooo! Ooo! Ooo! Comma fight! Comma fight!

    In addition to the semicolon error, I would also argue that Mr.
    Furlong's question mark is misplaced. It should be outside the quotes.

    LET THE PUNCTUATION WARS RESUME!
     
    Fred Moore, Feb 20, 2012
    #7
  8. Michelle Steiner

    George Kerby Guest

    Can't you recognize a typographical error when you see one? BTW, you should
    have used a semicolon instead of a comma in the second sentence.[/QUOTE]

    "OUCH! And Steiner, with a Left Grammar Hook, flattens the challenger!!!"
     
    George Kerby, Feb 20, 2012
    #8
  9. You are entirely correct.

    And the winner, by 40 rods, is Fred Moore.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 20, 2012
    #9
  10. Michelle Steiner

    Bread Guest

    My iMac won't run Lion. It's on SL and is still behaving pretty well,
    but I'm ready to upgrade. My inclination right now is to wait until
    they introduce a new iMac and get one of the current-generation ones on
    clearance. The bottom-of-the-line current one as a refurb has been
    seen at $1000 - a couple of hundred bucks off. It's awfully tempting.
    I'm not quite ready to move from SL on my desktop yet, so I'm hesitant
    to get the next-gen iMac which will almost certainly not run SL. The
    current one, of course, still does, as it came out a few months before
    Lion.
     
    Bread, Feb 20, 2012
    #10
  11. Michelle Steiner

    Bread Guest

    It depends on the context and on the punctuation mark itself. Periods
    and commas always go inside. Other things, not necessarily. In
    particular, in the case which started this, the ? should be on the
    outside since the entire question is not in the quote.

    This is a pretty nice guide:

    http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/quotes.asp

    Maybe if we all ask nicely, TheOatmeal will help us out with this in
    his signature humorous style.
     
    Bread, Feb 20, 2012
    #11
  12. That is an archaic custom, resulting from typesetting. Periods and commas
    were delicate pieces of type, so needed the protection of the quotation
    mark to keep them from being damaged when next to a blank (space) slug.

    Periods and commas should now follow the same rules as all other
    punctuation marks, placing them inside or outside the quotation, depending
    on context.

    -- Michelle
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 20, 2012
    #12
  13. Michelle Steiner

    Bread Guest

    I agree with the logic of "pertains to the quoted material". But after
    using the old standard for so long, it always looks a little funny to
    me.

    I'm not sure about Michelle's assertion that the old rule was a
    holdover from typesetting. It was taught to me many years ago and not
    in the context of typesetting, and reinforced in a typing class
    (although rules from typing are not all as sensible now as they may
    have once been, such as the double space after a sentence).
     
    Bread, Feb 20, 2012
    #13
  14. The period should go inside because the quote is an entire sentence.

    -- Michelle
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 20, 2012
    #14
  15. Once the rule became established and applied everywhere, no one bothered to
    explain where the rule came from.

    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quotation_mark#Punctuation>
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 20, 2012
    #15
  16. Then the containing sentence has no punctuation. No thanks. I'll keep it
    like it is.[/QUOTE]

    It's no different from he following:

    Just before leaving, she asked, "Should I install those updates on my
    computer?"

    The containing sentence has no punctuation.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 20, 2012
    #16
  17. I don't know of any style manual that recommends that.

    -- Michelle
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 21, 2012
    #17
  18. Michelle Steiner

    Henry Guest

    Can't you recognize a typographical error when you see one?[/QUOTE]

    Not so fast. If it had been 'advixe', 'adviwe' or 'advide', I think we
    would all agree to call it a typo. But in this case the mistake
    represents one of the classic examples of confused usage (along with
    things such as you're / your, discrete / discreet, etc.). However, the
    fact that 's' and 'c' are quite close together on a standard
    English-language keyboard (which you are presumably using) does stand in
    mitigation. Reasonable doubt? Yeah, all right -- you can have your
    'typographical' error.

    cheers,

    Henry
     
    Henry, Feb 21, 2012
    #18
  19. Michelle Steiner

    Alan Browne Guest

    Dude I can hit the L key when typing the Q key...

    But, there is also how people "spell". Some are deliberately thinking
    of the word and whether it is a noun, verb, adverb whatever. Some are
    more phonetic (me) and tend to make silly errors of the "there"
    "they're" type. I don't always read what I wrote before posting.

    Not sure 'type' what Michelle is but I'd tend to believe former rather
    than later.
     
    Alan Browne, Feb 21, 2012
    #19
  20. Gee, thanks.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 21, 2012
    #20
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