New Mac Security Update 2007-005

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Derek Currie, May 25, 2007.

  1. Derek Currie

    Derek Currie Guest

    You can read about the new update at:

    <http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=61798>

    It patches 13 security vulnerabilities. I'll spare you the list.


    As ever, before installing the update be certain to:

    A) Have a backup. (Rule #1 of computing...).

    B) Repair your boot drive. Do it from your boot DVD/CD if you
    have to via Disk Utility.

    C) Repair your boot drive's permissions.

    After the installation the system will ask to restart. It will
    then boot TWICE, so don't be freaked out.

    If you have any troubles (no one I know has) then check out
    MacFixIt for the latest suggestions.
    <http://www.macfixit.com>

    The vast majority of problems after updates are due to
    pre-existing problems on the boot drive.


    Share and enjoy,

    :-Derek

    --
    Fortune Magazine 11-29-05: What's your computer setup today?
    Frederick Brooks: I happily use a Macintosh. It's not been
    equalled for ease of use, and I want my computer to be a tool,
    not a challenge.
    <http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2005/12/12/8363107/>
    [Frederick Brooks is the author of 'The Mythical Man Month'.
    He spearheaded the movement to modernize computer software
    engineering in 1975.]
     
    Derek Currie, May 25, 2007
    #1
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  2. Derek Currie

    Wes Groleau Guest

    Hmmm. SU says I'm up-to-date but I have not installed 2007-005.
    I have 10.3.9 which is specifically listed on some of the
    issues.

    I wonder what else I'm missing.
     
    Wes Groleau, May 25, 2007
    #2
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  3. Nope, I've installed 2007-005 via SU on two machines with 10.3.9. (A
    600 MHz G3 iMac and a 1 GHz G4 eMac.)
    --
     
    Bjarne Bäckström, May 26, 2007
    #3
  4. Derek Currie

    Timberwoof Guest

    I updated my Xserve, which is running 10.3.9 (server), with today's
    update.
     
    Timberwoof, May 26, 2007
    #4
  5. Derek Currie

    Jesus Guest

    Same here... successfully updated a G4 PowerMac this morning.
    Rebooted once.
     
    Jesus, May 26, 2007
    #5
  6. Derek Currie

    Wes Groleau Guest

    Several of the items in its documentation list
    that they apply to 10.3.9
     
    Wes Groleau, May 26, 2007
    #6
  7. Derek Currie

    Derek Currie Guest

    ??

    My MOSX Server 10.3.9 SU noticed it right away when it was
    released.

    I believe Apple have a manual install app. You might give it a
    try. But I also suggest you check out your boot volume for
    problems.

    :-D

    --
    Fortune Magazine 11-29-05: What's your computer setup today?
    Frederick Brooks: I happily use a Macintosh. It's not been
    equalled for ease of use, and I want my computer to be a tool,
    not a challenge.
    <http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2005/12/12/8363107/>
    [Frederick Brooks is the author of 'The Mythical Man Month'.
    He spearheaded the movement to modernize computer software
    engineering in 1975.]
     
    Derek Currie, May 26, 2007
    #7
  8. Derek Currie

    Wes Groleau Guest

    Solved. I forgot I added a script ages ago to my
    periodic tasks to run software update. This
    Sec. Update was installed while I was sleeping
    about twenty hours ago.

    --
    Wes Groleau

    Change is inevitable.
    Liberals need to learn that "inevitable" is not a synonym for "good."
    Conservatives should learn that "inevitable" is not a synonym for "bad."
    -- WWG
     
    Wes Groleau, May 26, 2007
    #8
  9. Derek Currie

    Derek Currie Guest

    I personally would remove the script. There are two reasons why:

    1) Apple are not perfect and occasional updates in the past have
    been faulty and caused damage to systems. It is useful to get
    news from a site like MacFixIt where bleeding edge users verify
    the success of the latest update.

    2) It really is critical to follow the ABC rules before
    installing any update to Mac OS X:

    A) Make a backup (which is the first rule of computing).
    B) Repair your boot volume (from your boot install CD if
    necessary).
    C) Repair your boot volume permissions.

    Typically when I read about someone ending up with a mess after
    an update it turns out that their boot volume or hard drive had
    pre-existing problems.

    It is also useful to follow up any update with:

    D) Repair your boot volume permissions again.

    It has been a long while since I have seen an Apple update mangle
    permissions, but it most certainly has happened in the past. This
    can result in problems until the permissions are repaired.

    CONCLUSION: It is better to perform updates by your approval,
    making sure you follow steps A, B and C beforehand and D
    afterward.

    Also, it is not a good idea to keep a script on your Mac that
    contains your administrator password, which I expect is the case
    here. That password ideally shouldn't be anywhere but in your
    head. Alternatives are to store it in your Keychain or in an
    encrypted file, the passwords for which again would ideally be
    only in your head.


    Best Wishes,

    :-Derek

    --
    Fortune Magazine 11-29-05: What's your computer setup today?
    Frederick Brooks: I happily use a Macintosh. It's not been
    equalled for ease of use, and I want my computer to be a tool,
    not a challenge.
    <http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2005/12/12/8363107/>
    [Frederick Brooks is the author of 'The Mythical Man Month'.
    He spearheaded the movement to modernize computer software
    engineering in 1975.]
     
    Derek Currie, May 29, 2007
    #9
  10. I have never done any of that with regard to updating system software
    (or any other software), although since January of last year, I have
    done daily backups (but have never needed to restore from them), and
    have never encountered any problems resulting from the updates.
     
    Michelle Steiner, May 29, 2007
    #10
  11. Count yourself lucky, Michelle. Plenty of us *have* experienced
    major problems from Apple software updates that were released with
    errors in them where Apple figured out there were errors not long
    after and corrected them only after a few thousand people were bitten
    by them.[/QUOTE]

    I must lead a charmed life because I have rarely, if ever, experienced
    problems that other people have had. Even with the infamous Microsoft
    Word 3.0 release that was so bug ridden, I escaped all those ills.
     
    Michelle Steiner, May 29, 2007
    #11
  12. Derek Currie

    Wes Groleau Guest

    I have bootable clones that I can restore from
    if and when this happens.
    As mentioned.
    Done during reboot, which I cron'ed for every night
    (due to an application that has a "memory leak")
    BOO!! HISS!! Apple and I do NOT agree on what the groups
    and permissions should be.
    I have another daily task that sets groups, owners, and permissions
    to what _I_ want.
    No password is required for a root process ('cron') to run a script.
     
    Wes Groleau, May 29, 2007
    #12
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