new owner question...???

Discussion in 'Apple' started by The Translucent Amoebae, Aug 24, 2007.

  1. i just got a new macbook today, and without reading the tiny
    instruction book that came with it, i somehow managed to enter
    'default' into the browser set up dealie, and got online.
    of course, i don't have an online account, and i have some inkling
    that i'm piggybacking onto someone elses airport account...???
    a) why is this even possible?
    b) am i able to determine where it's originating from?
    c) when i get caught, what are the penalties?
    thanx.
     
    The Translucent Amoebae, Aug 24, 2007
    #1
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  2. The Translucent Amoebae

    Gerry Guest

    Well if it's a new MacBook it came with at least two word processors,
    Pages is part of the iWork suite, and Text Edit should be found on all
    Macs.
     
    Gerry, Aug 24, 2007
    #2
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  3. That's what it appears to be.
    Because the person didn't secure/protect the wireless network.
    Depends on local jurisdiction; could be nothing. It would be very hard
    to catch you, though, and probably not worth the effort to prosecute,
    even if it is illegal.
    Why? What computers these days come with word processors? TextEdit,
    which technically is a text editor, can do a hefty portion of what a
    word processor can do, and would suffice for many people's word
    processing needs. It came free with your Mac.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Aug 24, 2007
    #3
  4. All he gets with the computer is a trial version of iWork that expires
    after thirty days.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Aug 24, 2007
    #4
  5. The Translucent Amoebae

    David Empson Guest

    .... but the installed copy is a 30-day trial edition. It will cost US$79
    to buy iWork (including Pages).
    Correct.
     
    David Empson, Aug 24, 2007
    #5
  6. The Translucent Amoebae

    David Empson Guest

    Because one of your neighbours has set up a wireless network without
    knowing how to do it properly, and have left it wide open for anyone
    nearby to use. Wireless networks can easily span 30 metres (100 feet),
    usually more.

    A reasonably secure wireless network should at least require a password
    to connect to it.
    Not easily. You could try moving around your house and property with the
    laptop, and observe the wireless signal strength (Internet Connect gives
    the easiest to read strength meter).

    If the wireless signal is stronger at one end of the house than the
    other, then the base station for the "default" network is probably
    closer to that end of the house.

    This isn't 100% reliable, as signal reflections and wall materials might
    result in good and bad areas.

    If you are in an apartment and the base station is above or below you,
    you might get a reasonably even signal over a wide area. You would have
    to try other floors nearby to see whether the signal gets stronger or
    weaker as you go upstairs or downstairs.
    Depends on your local laws. It is probably a civil matter rather than
    criminal.

    You are stealing someone else's Internet connection, so if they are
    paying for connection time or traffic then you are costing them money.
    If they have a limit on the amount of data they can transfer within a
    period such as month, then you are preventing them from using part of
    the service they have paid for. At the very least, you will be causing
    them to get lower performance than they expected, due to your use of
    part of their available bandwidth.

    This could be regarded as a denial of service attack on their network.

    Assuming you don't have your own wireless network, you should resolve
    this by turning off Airport on your laptop. If you have the Airport
    status menu in the menu bar (looks like a quarter circle with concentric
    black bars indicating signal strength), you can easily do this by
    choosing "Turn Airport Off" in that menu.

    You can also do this using the Internet Connect application.

    If you do get your own wireless base station, you should set it up to
    create your own wireless network, give the network a suitable name and a
    reasonable level of security (use WPA/WPA2 mode with a good password),
    then tell your MacBook to use that network instead and ignore the
    "default" entry in your list of available networks.
     
    David Empson, Aug 24, 2007
    #6
  7. The Translucent Amoebae

    Bob Harris Guest

    Open Wifi access point. While your neighbor most likely doesn't
    want you using their broadband account, there are places where
    open access points are intentional, like some coffee shops, new
    car dealer customer service waiting rooms, hotels, etc...

    So if it is an open access point the Mac unless told otherwise,
    will attempt to join the network. In your case it succeeded
    joining your neighbor's network.
    Maybe. Get utility such as "AP Grapher", "MacStumbler", or
    "KisMac". Now take your MacBook and wonder around your
    neighborhood (or apartment building), until you find the
    house/apartment showing you the strongest signal strength for the
    connection you are using.
    Depends on the Country/State you live in. Different laws apply
    depending on location. But it can be much more expensive than
    paying for several years of your own broadband connection.

    And generally, most home broadband agreements do not allow your
    neighbor to share their connection.
     
    Bob Harris, Aug 24, 2007
    #7
  8. The Translucent Amoebae

    Kurt Ullman Guest

    Not easily. You could try moving around your house and property with the
    laptop, and observe the wireless signal strength (Internet Connect gives
    the easiest to read strength meter).[/QUOTE]

    Assuming that the person hasn't changed the SSID to something like
    "Next door Neighbor's Unsecured Network" (g). Of course if it isn't
    secured, it is probably still just "linksys".

    Kurt (Master of the Obvious) Ullman
     
    Kurt Ullman, Aug 24, 2007
    #8
  9. The Translucent Amoebae

    Kurt Ullman Guest

    Didn't we just go through this LOOOONNNNGG thread a coupla months
    ago??
     
    Kurt Ullman, Aug 24, 2007
    #9
  10. The Translucent Amoebae

    historystamp Guest

    It depends what the laws are.

    The wifi networked broadcasted its presence. Your computer saw the
    broadcaste. Your computer requested an ip address and the wifi network
    responded by sending you an ip address.

    The owner of the wife network has an option of turning off the
    broadcaste and not giving out an ip address.

    Do not know how far this argument would go.

    Robert
     
    historystamp, Aug 24, 2007
    #10
  11. The Translucent Amoebae

    Beavis Guest

    A much better analogy: If you're watching a movie on your big TV with
    your curtains open, and I'm walking on the sidewalk, am I welcome to
    watch that TV? Sure -- you're broadcasting it out into the street for
    all to see, just as the unsecured wireless access point is.
     
    Beavis, Aug 24, 2007
    #11
  12. The Translucent Amoebae

    Kurt Ullman Guest

    Can't we all just agree that until the Courts and/or
    lawmaker weigh in, we are pretty much just blowing smoked up each
    other's... well ya know... and let it go at that???

    Kurt (My guess is "no") Ullman
     
    Kurt Ullman, Aug 24, 2007
    #12
  13. The Translucent Amoebae

    Marc Heusser Guest

    Nice, isn't it?
    Apart from knowing whether the other party left the access point open
    intentionally, protect your computer:
    System Preferences>Sharing>Firewall >Start (if it is not running yet).

    HTH

    Mac

    (If you want to find more open nets: iStumbler, KisMac ...)
     
    Marc Heusser, Aug 24, 2007
    #13
  14. The Translucent Amoebae

    Ian Gregory Guest

    I agree. If anyone is "in the wrong" it is arguably the TV or access
    point owner. In the case of the access point they may have an agreement
    not to share the connection, and by willingly handing out IP addresses
    to random people they are breaking that agreement. If you are watching
    a DVD on your TV the copyright notice says it is only for your own
    private viewing - you are not allowed to show it to the public.

    The person walking past your window or accidentally finding themselves
    connected to your wireless point rather than their own or a public
    access one is not breaking any such agreement.

    But as everyone knows, the law is an ass, so what happens in practice
    is anybody's guess.

    Ian
     
    Ian Gregory, Aug 24, 2007
    #14
  15. The Translucent Amoebae

    David Empson Guest

    Assuming that the person hasn't changed the SSID to something like
    "Next door Neighbor's Unsecured Network" (g). Of course if it isn't
    secured, it is probably still just "linksys".[/QUOTE]

    According to the OP's description, the SSID was "default". I think that
    is what D-Link uses by default.
     
    David Empson, Aug 24, 2007
    #15
  16. The Translucent Amoebae

    Kurt Ullman Guest

    I don't recall. I probably killfiled it...[/QUOTE]

    Might of been on alt.internet.wireless, instead. This seems like a
    carbon copy, so it is VERY killfileable... In fact, that's such a good
    idea, that I think I';; do it. Thanks for the suggestion..
     
    Kurt Ullman, Aug 24, 2007
    #16
  17. ZOMG! You are right! It doesn't come with a large integer crunching
    suite! Or a spreadsheet! Or the development tools!

    Oh wait, most people don't need those, either.

    Does Windows XP come with Office? I'm just asking. It's been awhile
    since I had to deal with a Windows box not created for me by an IT group.

    I'm guessing Windows /still/ comes with an RTF editor like WordPad. If
    only there was the equivalent or better installed by default with OS X...
     
    Clever Monkey, Aug 24, 2007
    #17
  18. ZOMG! You are right! It doesn't come with a large integer crunching
    suite! Or a spreadsheet! Or the development tools![/QUOTE]

    I believe that it does come with the development tools.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Aug 24, 2007
    #18
  19. The Translucent Amoebae

    Jon Guest

    I believe that it does come with the development tools.[/QUOTE]

    And an RTF editor...
     
    Jon, Aug 24, 2007
    #19
  20. The Translucent Amoebae

    Ian Gregory Guest

    But note the first step in the instructions for installing
    MacPorts:

    1) Download and install the latest version of Xcode Tools -
    do not install an older version from the OS X 10.4 install
    disk or some ports may fail to install.

    Fortunately XCode (development tools) is a free download from Apple.

    As to the inclusion or non-inclusion of a "Word Processor" in
    Mac OS X, I for one couldn't care less. I have never used a
    "Word Processor" and I am not about to start - Vim does what
    I need.

    Ian
     
    Ian Gregory, Aug 24, 2007
    #20
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