New PSU for DELL Inspiron 530 desktop

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Jonathan Eales, Nov 8, 2008.

  1. I've just bought on a whim a XFX nVidia 9600GSO overclocked graphics card
    for a good price. The online specification said it requires a 400W PSU,
    however the box says 500W.

    I doubt my DELL Inspiron 530 desktop with a 300W (rated) PSU will handle it
    and I'm not about to try it.

    So I need recommendations for a 500W PSU that will fit into the smallish
    DELL minitower case, is quiet and will have the correct (mostly SATA plus
    PCI-E 6) cabling. Any ideas?

    Jonathan
     
    Jonathan Eales, Nov 8, 2008
    #1
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  2. Thanks Tom,

    But what is likely to happen? Please choose from the following:

    a) system boots, then works and 3D games are fine.
    b) system boots, then works and 3D games crash consistently.
    c) system boots then freezes.
    d) system won't boot gives an error message or beeps.
    e) system won't boot
    f) system boots, then works but 3D game causes sparks, smoke and loud bang;
    requiring replacement of CPU, motherboard, memory, PSU, etc.

    I'll copy any responses onto the insurance claim, especially f) if my house
    burns down. ;-)

    Jonathan


     
    Jonathan Eales, Nov 8, 2008
    #2
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  3. Jonathan Eales

    S.Lewis Guest


    The ATI HD 2600XT 256mb Dell offers with that system requires either a 400w
    or 500w PS:
    http://ati.amd.com/products/radeonhd2600/radeonhd2600xt/specs.html

    So, unless one assumes Dell uses a chassis equipped with that higher spec'd
    PS for orders with that card (possible, but unlikely in my experience), then
    they're running that card off the same PS as yours.

    fwiw.
     
    S.Lewis, Nov 8, 2008
    #3
  4. Jonathan Eales

    WSZsr Guest

    If you want peace of mind, buy a "pc power and cooling" ps but please send
    me your old Dell ps. :)
     
    WSZsr, Nov 8, 2008
    #4
  5. Hi!
    I would encourage you to give it a shot. Dell's power supplies are typically
    well built and heavy enough to stand more of a load than Dell prints on the
    nameplate. (As an example, my Dimension 8300 has all of its expansion slots
    fully loaded, two SATA hard drives, an ATI Radeon X1600, 2GB installed RAM
    and a number of USB devices. It began life with a 3.4GHz Prescott and now
    has a 2.8GHz Northwood CPU. Both were run at 100% utilization constantly in
    distributed.net. The power supply is rated at 305 watts output on the label,
    was made by Lite-On, and pulls about 170 watts from the power outlet on
    average. It has never skipped a beat and has run 24/7 since I bought it in
    2004.)

    Other computer manufacturers don't seem to be as generous.

    If you do want a new power supply, get one that is worth having. I've had
    excellent luck with Enlight, AGI/HiPro, and PC Power and Cooling. Of all of
    these, PC Power and Cooling is top-notch equipment. Your computer uses a
    standard ATX connection setup.

    William
     
    William R. Walsh, Nov 9, 2008
    #5
  6. Thank you all for your confidence that was well placed. I tried the
    graphics card and it works. I spent half an hour hard 3D gaming without any
    problems. The PSU exhaust air just seemed to get slightly warmer and you
    could hear the graphics card fan speed up.

    So far so good. Thanks again everyone.

    Jonathan
     
    Jonathan Eales, Nov 9, 2008
    #6
  7. Jonathan Eales

    LouieG Guest

    I have a 530 with a q6600 quad core, 2 dvd burners, 3gigs of ram, 2 500
    gig hds, a 9600 gt video card ans a soundblaster xfi gamer sound card
    running on my stock psu. Dell really under rates their power supplies,
    and you should be fine.
     
    LouieG, Nov 9, 2008
    #7
  8. Jonathan Eales

    westom1 Guest

    A 300 watt supply rated by computer designers may be labeled as 430
    watts by people selling to computer assemblers.

    Is the power supply sufficient? Nobody can say without numbers.
    Your testing by accessing all peripherals simultaneously then makes
    possible four meter measurements (about 30 second of labor that says
    far more than your 30 minute test). With computer accessing all
    peripherals, simply measure voltages from any one purple, red, yellow,
    and orange wire from that supply. Then post those numbers here so
    that the better informed can say, without doubt, if the power supply
    is sufficient.

    A defective or too small supply can still boot a computer and work
    for a half hour as you tested. But the same defective or too small
    supply is indentified in but 30 seconds with the meter. IOW how to
    avoid a long list of strange and confusing failures in the future.
    Get meter numbers.

    Chances are the power supply was more than sufficient. Dell
    provides honest numbers at 300 watts. Others hype a higher wattage
    number because their market is people who know nothing about
    electricity and little about how computers work. Meter would not only
    confirm your power supply is sufficient. It would also teach
    additional and useful information for the future.
     
    westom1, Nov 10, 2008
    #8
  9. Jonathan Eales

    S.Lewis Guest


    The only thing that concerns me in the OP's scenario is the fact that Dell
    no longer uses a Dell-badged/label PS any more in the Inspiron and Vostro
    desktop systems. In fact, those models now use PS's from 2-3 vendors such
    as Best Tec - who also supply EMachines, HP and the like.

    I suspect this was and is a cost-cutting measure.

    The non-budget lines of Dell desktops (Optiplex, XPS, and Precision
    workstations) still use a Dell-labeled PS that used to be produced by
    Delta/Hi-Pro.

    Bottom line: I really don't know how good the OEM PS is/are in the Inspiron
    and Vostro desktops; but I feel sure that they are cheaper.

    fwiw.......
     
    S.Lewis, Nov 10, 2008
    #9
  10. Jonathan Eales

    westom1 Guest

    Two type of power supplies exist. Those that do what was required
    even 35 years ago. Another supply, relabeled with higher watts, may
    be also missing essential functions required even 35 years ago. Was
    the supply vetted by an engineer, or selected by an accountant? If
    the computer is labeled as Gateway or E-machines, then the power
    supply may have been selected using financial reasoning. If the
    computer is labeled Dell or HP, then the power supply was selected by
    using the Wal-mart technique of learning what is inside - a product
    oriented analysis.

    Dell never made power supplies just like they never made disk
    drives, CPUs, BIOSes, or ribbon cables. Were each component selected
    by the finance or purchasing department, or by the engineering
    department? Does that power supply contain essential functions that
    were standard even 35 years ago? Many power supplies hyped to
    computer assembler simply claims more watts because too many computer
    assemblers never even demand a full page or two of numeric
    specifications.

    Having said all this, even Dell and HP sell two types of systems.
    One will even use non-standard parts because nothing is intended for
    upgrade. The other uses industry standards (ie ATX power supplies)
    because the more expensive computer is also designed to be upgraded.

    Is the computer designed by finance people or product people? One
    indication. Did the manufacturer provide comprehensive hardware
    diagnostics for free? A finance person will only see increased cost
    and is marketing to computer assembler types who don't even know what
    a diagnostic is. Computer designed by product people would also have
    those necessary hardware diagnostics.
     
    westom1, Nov 11, 2008
    #10
  11. Jonathan Eales

    Ben Myers Guest

    Stew,

    I second your motion about the cheapness of Bestec. Pretty awful
    junk... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, Nov 11, 2008
    #11
  12. Jonathan Eales

    S.Lewis Guest



    I keep forgetting they sold their soul to the devil completely with those
    two models. The reason I forget is that I've only placed (1) of them with a
    client in the last two years - preferring to go with either other models
    from the Outlet or new.
     
    S.Lewis, Nov 11, 2008
    #12
  13. I've sold a lot of the Vostros and Inspiron desktops and despite my initial
    misgivings about the flimsy case and the number of screws, etc. they do seem
    to be reliable. And as this episode has shown, well specified and
    conservatively rated.

    In the UK you pay a 50% premium if you want to purchase an equivalently
    specced Optiplex 360, the value business model. That is quite a premium for
    most small companies at the moment.

    Jonathan
     
    Jonathan Eales, Nov 11, 2008
    #13
  14. Jonathan Eales

    S.Lewis Guest


    I can certainly understand that argument.

    Here in the states the Opti330 prices are comparable or even cheaper at
    times (depending on promotions and coupons) than the Vostro desktop line -
    and most times with a 3-year NBD onsite warranty versus only 1 for the
    Vostros.

    We do what we can.
     
    S.Lewis, Nov 11, 2008
    #14
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