Newbie question about backups and time machine

Discussion in 'Apple' started by JF Mezei, Sep 4, 2009.

  1. JF Mezei

    JF Mezei Guest

    Am I correct in assuming that Time Machine doesn't have a full backup of
    my hard drive, only certain folders are scanned for updates ?

    Prior to upgrading to snow leopard, should I just stop time machine, zap
    the backup drive and then use some disk copy utility to copy my drive
    onto the backup drive ? (is disk-util OK to do full disk copy , or
    should I look at some unix level ones to do it ?)
     
    JF Mezei, Sep 4, 2009
    #1
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  2. JF Mezei

    Guest Guest

    it has nearly everything.
    superduper can clone a time machine drive, if that's what you are
    asking. otherwise, snow leopard should continue to use the existing
    backup after you upgrade.
     
    Guest, Sep 4, 2009
    #2
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  3. The only folders that are not backed up are the ones that you explicitly
    exclude in TM's preferences.
    No need to stop or Zap TM; if you want to make a clone backup, make it to
    another hard drive.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Sep 4, 2009
    #3
  4. JF Mezei

    Guest Guest

    not true. it skips things like cache folders (which can be recreated)
    and some unix folders (which usually won't matter to most people).
     
    Guest, Sep 4, 2009
    #4
  5. not true. it skips things like cache folders (which can be recreated)
    and some unix folders (which usually won't matter to most people).[/QUOTE]

    OK. The only meaningful folders that are not backed up are the ones that
    you explicitly exclude in TM's preferences.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Sep 4, 2009
    #5
  6. JF Mezei

    Guest Guest

    OK. The only meaningful folders that are not backed up are the ones that
    you explicitly exclude in TM's preferences.[/QUOTE]

    the unix folders may be meaningful to some people, such as adam engst
    of tidbits. he wrote about how time machine skipped archiving his sql
    database which was in /private somewhere (i don't remember exactly
    where). he only learned this when he had to restore it and the database
    wasn't as up to date as he thought.
     
    Guest, Sep 4, 2009
    #6
  7. JF Mezei

    Warren Oates Guest

    I back that (and everything else) up using rsync. I've never really
    looked into TM.
     
    Warren Oates, Sep 5, 2009
    #7
  8. You should, if only to see the effect of having your desktop drop down
    and reveal the hidden time machine behind it.

    It's so dramatic that even after having done it dozens of times I still
    get goose bumps when I open the <cue echo chamber> Time Machine.
     
    John Steinberg, Sep 5, 2009
    #8
  9. JF Mezei

    Tim Streater Guest

    It's also dead simple to use and when restoring a file means no faffing
    about in Terminal to do so.
     
    Tim Streater, Sep 5, 2009
    #9
  10. JF Mezei

    Warren Oates Guest

    If I need to restore a file, I can use the mouse and GUI.
     
    Warren Oates, Sep 5, 2009
    #10
  11. JF Mezei

    Simon Slavin Guest

    Ones which can or will be reconstructed without losing anything
    important. For instance, '/tmp' and many folders which exist just to
    contain caches.
     
    Simon Slavin, Sep 5, 2009
    #11
  12. JF Mezei

    Guest Guest

    no, it skips stuff that might matter. ask adam engst of tidbits how it
    skipped backing up hi sql database.
     
    Guest, Sep 5, 2009
    #12
  13. JF Mezei

    Tom Stiller Guest

    /dev, for one; it's rebuilt on IPL.
     
    Tom Stiller, Sep 6, 2009
    #13
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