NF7-S vc NF7-M

Discussion in 'Abit' started by Bjarke Ravn-Jonsen, Jan 8, 2004.

  1. Can the Abit NF7-M run with a FSB of 400? Apparently it supports PC3200
    memory, but I couldn't find out whether it is possibly to do the same as on
    the NF7-S (that is, overclocking a CPU which is supposed to run at 333 FSB
    to a FSB at 400)
    So is the only difference the GFX part on the chipset, from M to S ?
    And what about the bios, does M still have softmenu like the S ?
     
    Bjarke Ravn-Jonsen, Jan 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. Bjarke Ravn-Jonsen

    Jef Norton Guest

    | Can the Abit NF7-M run with a FSB of 400? Apparently it supports PC3200
    | memory, but I couldn't find out whether it is possibly to do the same as
    on
    | the NF7-S (that is, overclocking a CPU which is supposed to run at 333 FSB
    | to a FSB at 400)
    | So is the only difference the GFX part on the chipset, from M to S ?
    | And what about the bios, does M still have softmenu like the S ?
    |
    |
    | --
    | /Bjarke
    |
    |

    Hi Bjarke -

    The maximum official front side bus speed on the NF7-M is 333MHz. It will
    run PC3200 memory, but will only accomplish a memory speed of 400MHz if you
    use an add-on video card. The on-board video significantly limits the
    ability to overclock the NF7-M.

    Revision 2.0 of both the NF7 and the NF7-S support an official front side
    bus of 400MHz.

    Both systems can be overclocked, though, as mentioned before, the NF7-M is
    limited in this area if using the on-board video.

    Both boards have AGP 4X/8X slots for add-on video cards.

    Other differences between the NF7-M and the NF7-S include:
    .. NF7-M uses a Realtek audio chip (MCP2) where NF7-S has the much better
    SoundStorm audio (MCP2-T).
    .. NF7-M has on-board nVidia GeForce4 MX graphics (AGP 4X).
    .. NF7-S has on-board Serial ATA.
    .. NF7-S has on-board IEE1394.

    Both boards have the SoftMenu III BIOS for setting up the bus speed and
    multiplier, etc.

    Jef
     
    Jef Norton, Jan 9, 2004
    #2
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  3. Bjarke Ravn-Jonsen

    Erik Alvar Guest

    I have the NF7-M and can verify that things get a bit hairy w/
    200/400FSB and onboard video enabled. It can be done, however with some
    patience and willingness to spend time testing BIOS settings. I have an
    Athlon XP 1700+ (JIUHB0302) running at 2200 (200x11) and it is very stable.
    It took some tweaking in the BIOS and I had to increase voltages, but it is
    stable. Anything over 202 gets iffy.

    I'm running Kingston HyperX PC 3000 (2x256) memory. I am using a
    ThermalTake Volcano 9 heatsink/fan and Arctic Silver thermal compound.

    E
     
    Erik Alvar, Jan 9, 2004
    #3
  4. Bjarke Ravn-Jonsen

    SL Guest

    The NF7-M is much less of a board than is the NF7-S. You would be better
    off buying the S and then springing for a cheap video card until you could
    afford a nice one. About the only thing the M is good for is
    building a bunch of workstations for an office, where you didn't want to
    bother putting them together.

    S
     
    SL, Jan 9, 2004
    #4
  5. Bjarke Ravn-Jonsen

    John Guest

    The NF7-M does indeed support a 200 FSB (400 when doubled) just like the
    NF7-S.

    The NF7 series boards are built in a common chipset, and are very similar.
    NF7 Basic board
    NF7-S Adds SATA drive support (no onboard video)
    NF7-M Adds onboard video (no SATA)

    The onboard video is identical to a nVIDIA GeForce4 MX 420.
    If you need faster video, get a NF7 and separate video.
    If you need SATA support, get a NF7-S and separate video.
    Otherwise, the NF7-M is a very good choice.

    John
     
    John, Jan 10, 2004
    #5
  6. Bjarke Ravn-Jonsen

    Jef Norton Guest

    Hi John -

    As I mentioned in my first post to the O.P., the maximum *official* front
    side bus speed on the NF7-M is 333MHz (166MHz DDR).

    I did not say the board could not be overclocked to a FSB of 400MHz (200MHz
    DDR). I did say, however, that if the on-board graphics is being used, the
    overclocking capabilities of the board are not as good as the NF7-S
    (especially revision 2.0, which supports an official FSB of 400MHz).

    Check out the product descriptions of both boards at http://www.abit-usa.com
    (I have cut and pasted the following):

    For the NF7-S:
    "The NF7-S, based on nForce2 chipset (MCP-T + SPP), supports the latest AMD
    Athlon XP processors with 200/266/333/400 FSB, (400 FSB support in version
    2.0 only)."

    For the NF7-M:
    "The NF7-M, based on nForce2 chipset (MCP + IGP), supports the latest AMD
    Athlon XP, Barton™ processors with 200/266/333 FSB."

    Revision 2.0 of the NF7 board also supports 200/266/333/400 FSB as well.

    Please don't post inaccurate information.

    Jef


    | The NF7-M does indeed support a 200 FSB (400 when doubled) just like the
    | NF7-S.
    |
    | The NF7 series boards are built in a common chipset, and are very similar.
    | NF7 Basic board
    | NF7-S Adds SATA drive support (no onboard video)
    | NF7-M Adds onboard video (no SATA)
    |
    | The onboard video is identical to a nVIDIA GeForce4 MX 420.
    | If you need faster video, get a NF7 and separate video.
    | If you need SATA support, get a NF7-S and separate video.
    | Otherwise, the NF7-M is a very good choice.
    |
    | John
    |
    |
    | | > On Thu, 08 Jan 2004 23:09:09 +0100, Bjarke Ravn-Jonsen wrote:
    | >
    | > > Can the Abit NF7-M run with a FSB of 400? Apparently it supports
    PC3200
    | > > memory, but I couldn't find out whether it is possibly to do the same
    as
    | on
    | > > the NF7-S (that is, overclocking a CPU which is supposed to run at 333
    | FSB
    | > > to a FSB at 400)
    | > > So is the only difference the GFX part on the chipset, from M to S ?
    | > > And what about the bios, does M still have softmenu like the S ?
    | >
    | > The NF7-M is much less of a board than is the NF7-S. You would be
    better
    | > off buying the S and then springing for a cheap video card until you
    could
    | > afford a nice one. About the only thing the M is good for is
    | > building a bunch of workstations for an office, where you didn't want to
    | > bother putting them together.
    | >
    | > S
    |
    |
     
    Jef Norton, Jan 10, 2004
    #6
  7. Bjarke Ravn-Jonsen

    SL Guest

    About the only thing I would disagree with is your statement regarding the
    ease of getting the M to 400 fsb. I've heard this is very problematic
    using the integrated video. I don't know if you add your own video card
    (if you are going to do that then why buy the M in the first place).

    My point was that the M really offers no advantage over the S, and the S
    offers better sound, SATA, and a guaranteed 400 fsb. Both are about the
    same price the last time I looked.

    I'll be happy to trade my working M for a working S!!!!!!!!!!

    S
     
    SL, Jan 10, 2004
    #7
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