No CD copy program exists on Vista

Discussion in 'Dell' started by BigRog, May 17, 2007.

  1. BigRog

    BigRog Guest

    When I updated from Windows XP to Vista home edition, I lost the
    preinstalled "CD Copy" program that was came with computer. I think
    the old program was called Sonic

    In other words I was able to diskcopy any CD non copyright program.

    What do I use now?

    Thanks.

    Roger
     
    BigRog, May 17, 2007
    #1
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  2. That program was not a part of XP, it was a 3rd party program that was
    supplied by another vendor.

    A CD Copier program comes with the "full retail" version of all of the
    major CD burning software (Roxio, Nero and Sonic)(actually, Sonic now
    owns Roxio, but the product lines are not yet merged).
     
    Barry Watzman, May 17, 2007
    #2
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  3. BigRog

    BigRog Guest

    Hi Barry,

    I am looking for a freebee.

    Roger
     
    BigRog, May 17, 2007
    #3
  4. BigRog

    Ben Myers Guest

    Try Burn4Free and CDBurnerXPPro. Not sure if either works with Vista, but they
    are worth the try. There are a couple of other free CD burning programs
    available, but I have not tried any of them yet... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, May 17, 2007
    #4
  5. BigRog

    S.Lewis Guest


    Did Vista lose the "native" Roxio drop/drag or "send to" CD burning
    features from XP?

    I haven't attempted it yet as I have Nero 7 installed on WinVU.

    Anyone?


    Stew
     
    S.Lewis, May 18, 2007
    #5
  6. BigRog

    BigRog Guest

    I found Free Download


    Roxio Easy Media Creator 7.5 Supersonic (E) 7.5 Supersonic (E) for
    windows XP. Does anybody know if it works for Vista?

    Roger
     
    BigRog, May 18, 2007
    #6
  7. BigRog

    Ben Myers Guest

    All you can do is install and try most of these programs. Recently, Microsoft
    complained that Independent Hardware Vendors (IHVs) did not provide enough
    drivers for Vista. Well, Vista has changed radically enough that both older
    drivers and older software applications break when installed or run. So
    Microsoft spreads the blame for the lack of success of Vista. How unpatriotic
    of us all to think that Vista is flawed! Though not covered by the Patriot
    Act, any dissent about Vista could be under surveillance... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, May 18, 2007
    #7
  8. I'm not aware of any Roxio products that are legally free.

    I believe that only Roxio version 9 works with Vista.
     
    Barry Watzman, May 18, 2007
    #8
  9. BigRog

    Tom Scales Guest

    Ben,

    Your position is ludicrous. Normally we agree a bit more.

    By your argument, Microsoft should never make any substantial changes to
    Windows, because it would require effort on the part of the IHV and ISV.
    Microsoft must ensure that every interface is absolutely identical from
    release to release.

    Even though they published the specifications literally years in advance
    and locked them down a good two years ago. Even though the have been
    providing betas for almost four years.

    You do realize that by your argument, we'd all be running the latest
    release of Windows 1.0? Not even 3.1, 1.0. No 95. No NT. No Windows
    2000. No XP. We would still have DOS underneath. No true multitasking.
    No multimonitor support. No wireless support. Minimal network support.
    No domains.

    Seriously, what would you suggest that they should have done
    differently? The VAST majority of applications and even drivers run
    unchanged. If the developer followed the XP development standards, it is
    very likely the application still works. It is the developers that
    pushed out the edges and delivered code that worked in XP, but barely,
    that are having problems. Every single application that I have
    developed and use (programming is a hobby) runs flawlessly without
    recompile. Install and run. Some are complex file manipulation
    utilities. Every one works.

    I don't have a single commercial application that did not work on Vista.
    Not one. Some required I be running the latest version, which seems
    reasonable, as how could they have shipped me a version years ago that
    would have anticipated Vista. That said, many of my very old
    applications work fine too.

    I would love to hear what you believe they should have done differently.

    Tom
     
    Tom Scales, May 18, 2007
    #9
  10. BigRog

    Journey Guest

    I'm with Tom on this one. I expected Vista to be so much trouble
    based on gloomy predictions, and everyone jumping on the negative
    bandwagon about Vista.

    Comments about the Vista production release being a beta and people
    should wait for SP1 are untrue. This isn't a beta. It's a solid
    release. See my recent favorite utitilites post. Yes, people should
    know that their apps run under Vista, but for many I believe they will
    find that all of them do.

    I use Roxio Easy Media Creatore Deluxe on Vista and it works fine. I
    disable drag-to-disk at startup because it causes problems at times.

    To me it seems that MS took it's time to have a loooong beta and RC
    test.

    Also, built into Vista are options that enable you to run without
    Glass in case those graphics API's cause apps to not work under glass.

    I bought 2 hard drives for my laptop. One of them was going to be
    dedicated to Vista, which based on the bandwagon of criticism I
    thought wouldn't be stable. My XP hard drive is sitting there unused.
    Vista, as I posted about before, is prime time for me, and I am using
    it, and I like it.

    There are only a few things that don't run on Vista. One is my old HP
    Jornada 728 handheld PC. Vista's new ActiveSync replacement doesn't
    work with devices that old. No biggie, I don't use it at all right
    now.

    I don't think MS should have done anything differently as far as
    testing and release of Vista. I do wish that they had made several
    changes to the interface, but I wasn't part of the betas adding my 2
    cents worth either.
     
    Journey, May 18, 2007
    #10
  11. BigRog

    Ben Myers Guest

    In defense of my position, let me state that the marketplace by-and-large has
    decided that Vista offers too little bang for the buck. Let me count the ways:

    1. Price of Vista itself. Why spend a minimum of $100 to fix what is not
    broken?
    2. Price of hardware added to the computer and needed to run an
    ever-more-bloated new version of Windows. Think memory, more memory, and a
    graphics card.
    3. Price of replacement peripheral devices to take the place of devices for
    which Vista drivers do not exist. Some of these are high quality devices with
    relatively low usage like printers and scanners. Chipsets on motherboards and
    add-in cards end up as orphans, too, when the manufacturer of the chipset has
    gone belly up or simply decides not to do anything for Vista.
    4. Price of any additional software required to replace software that will not
    run under Vista. There are some commercial retail-packaged products in this
    category, but the biggest impact is on the in-house applications written by
    financial, governmental, and other large enterprises.
    5. Absence of any truly compelling "must have" features or functions that would
    sell an operating system product.

    Microsoft has tried to make the tail wag the dog with Vista, thinking that the
    operating system will sell all by itself. The reality is that applications and
    hardware sell the operating system.

    So what next? Continued slow acceptance of Vista, as individual computer
    owners and businesses both do what is required to be able to use computers that
    run it. At some point, Microsoft will cease all support for XP, and this, too,
    will stimulate sales of new Vista-capable equipment.

    Dell made the extremely pragmatic decision to offer XP again on many of the
    models which were Vista-only since the original Vista launch date in November.

    .... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, May 19, 2007
    #11
  12. BigRog

    BigRog Guest

    BigRog, May 19, 2007
    #12
  13. BigRog

    GTS Guest

    InfrRecorder is a free open source program that supports Vista. I have used
    it in Vista with no problems copying and burning CDs (and DVDs). It is not
    as good as Nero and the like and seems to have problems with advanced
    features like multi session burns, but it's basic features work fine.
    http://infrarecorder.sourceforge.net/
     
    GTS, May 20, 2007
    #13
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