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old bios and bigger hdd's

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by mikele, Apr 21, 2005.

  1. mikele

    mikele Guest

    hello,

    I'm having serious problems with connecting 30 gb hard drive to my
    aging thinkpad 600. It's generally seen as 20 gb size drive by DOS
    FDISK. What's really odd linux cfdisk recognizes only remaining 9 gb
    disk size. The worst thing is that any OS refuses to install - windows
    crashes with BSOD while loading partmgr.sys.
    Could it be caused by old BIOS (circa 1999)?

    Looking forward to reading all your suggestions.
    Regards,
    mike
     
    mikele, Apr 21, 2005
    #1
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  2. mikele

    JHEM Guest

    Update the BIOS!

    Then FDISK the HD and wipe all partitions, then start over again.

    Regards,

    James
     
    JHEM, Apr 21, 2005
    #2
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  3. mikele

    mikele Guest

    Update the BIOS!
    Guess what James - I've just done it - got the latest BIOS and the
    problem persists :( What's even odd I've attached this 30gb drive to
    my desktop computer and it works like charm! Any clue?
     
    mikele, Apr 23, 2005
    #3
  4. mikele

    BillW50 Guest

    Guess what James - I've just done it - got the latest BIOS and
    the problem persists :( What's even odd I've attached this 30gb
    drive to my desktop computer and it works like charm! Any clue?

    Yup, it sounds like the BIOS doesn't support 30GB HD. Which is odd
    since if there is a problem, it is usually at 32GB or larger for
    that era machine.

    All is not lost though. And while I really hate these things. But
    most manufactures of hard drives also have a software program to
    fool the BIOS to see the whole drive. So you might want to check
    that one out.

    The reason why I hate them is because if you use it in another
    computer that doesn't need it, well I don't trust it. Also software
    like Partition Magic seems to have trouble with this stuff as well.
    I almost lost the data on two different hard drives. Had taken about
    two days each time to pull everything back again. What a nightmare!




    Cheers!


    __________________________________________________
    Bill (using a Toshiba 2595XDVD under Windows 2000)
    -- written and edited within WordStar 5.0
     
    BillW50, Apr 23, 2005
    #4
  5. mikele

    mikele Guest

    Bill, great thanks for your help! I tried that "change capacity"
    feature but with no success- it was still seen as 20 GB. Until, I came
    up with this solution totally out of blue: changed my hdd's jumpers to
    DRIVE1 (slave?), booted to fdisk which saw no active partition. Then
    removed jumpers (making it DRIVE0=master), once again loaded fdisk,
    but this time it did see 28.xx GB ! How can you explain that?

    Best regards,
    Mike
     
    mikele, Apr 26, 2005
    #5
  6. mikele

    BillW50 Guest

    Date: 26 Apr 2005 14:28:44 -0700

    Bill, great thanks for your help! I tried that "change
    capacity" feature but with no success- it was still seen as 20
    GB. Until, I came up with this solution totally out of blue:
    changed my hdd's jumpers to DRIVE1 (slave?), booted to fdisk
    which saw no active partition. Then removed jumpers (making it
    DRIVE0=master), once again loaded fdisk, but this time it did
    see 28.xx GB ! How can you explain that? Best regards, Mike

    Hi Mike... Well that removing jumper makes it more puzzling for
    sure! As it would more sense if you needed the jumper to make it a
    Master. As this could easily be explained by a poor connection. And
    often unplugging and re-plugging things back in again fixes many
    problems, believe it or not. <grin>

    But no jumper... well I do know some drives uses electronically
    writable chips (EEPROM) to store the firmware for the drive. And if
    the EEPROM was confused there for some reason until you changed it
    to a Slave and then back to a Master had reset it once again.

    Some drives also has a jumper to add or remove large hard drive
    support. This is for those BIOS that won't normally support them
    without this option. Which could be another reason to explain what
    happened. As maybe this jumper got bumped and kicked it into gear
    again. Otherwise I'm running out of ideas. But at least it working
    now. And that's a good thing! <grin>






    Cheers!


    ________________________________________________________
    Bill (using a HP Pavilion AMD 1.2GHZ under Windows 2000)
    -- written and edited within WordStar 5.0
     
    BillW50, Apr 27, 2005
    #6
  7. I seem to recall FAT32 can't be done on drives over 30 GIG - is this the
    problem perhaps?

    regards,

    MSC
     
    Matthew Carrick, Apr 29, 2005
    #7
  8. mikele

    Lars Guest

    Maximum size of a Fat32 partition is 2 Terabyte or 2048 GB.


    Lars
    Stockholm
    http://web.telia.com/~u84406120/
     
    Lars, Apr 29, 2005
    #8
  9. No, your recollection ("FAT32 can't be done on drives over 30 GIG") is
    incorrect.
     
    Barry Watzman, May 1, 2005
    #9
  10. Oops! Never mind . . . !

    MSC
     
    Matthew Carrick, May 1, 2005
    #10
  11. Windows XP will format only thirty gigabytes in a partition using
    FAT32 because the cluster sizes get too large. It is a limitation
    of operating system and not the file system. You can FDISK and
    format the drive with Windows 95 OSR2 through Windows Millennium to
    get around the limitation.
     
    Earl F. Parrish, May 5, 2005
    #11
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