1. This forum section is a read-only archive which contains old newsgroup posts. If you wish to post a query, please do so in one of our main forum sections (here). This way you will get a faster, better response from the members on Motherboard Point.

On board Video memory. Am I using the full 256 MB video memory.Shared?

Discussion in 'Nvidia' started by lbbss, May 15, 2009.

  1. lbbss

    lbbss Guest

    I have a fast Dell (quad core) xp computer with 2MB ram and 256MB on
    board video memory (nvida). I use 3D cad and getting crashes often
    when rotation complex cad models. I updated to the latest video
    drivers and latest bios. Looked in the bios and there is nothing
    limiting the video memory. I looked under video advanced settings
    and it tells me that I am using 11MB of the video memory, on a
    different occasion it show I was using 30MB of video memory. My
    question is, how do I know that my system is using the full 256MB of
    the video memory? Is there any settings on my computer that dictates
    how much of it can be used? How do I know that my video memory is
    not shared with anything else on my computer? thank.

    p.s. Sorry I could not at the moment give you more information on the
    specs of my computer or video card (I thing its Nvida), I am posting
    from home, and don't remember all the specifics from work. could add
    some more details tomorrow after work. thanks.
     
    lbbss, May 15, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. lbbss

    deimos Guest

    I'm going to assume you have something like a Geforce 6100 or GF8 series
    integrated graphics. You should be able to run AutoCAD, ProE, CATIA,
    Solidworks, etc, provided you're using vendor certified drivers and that
    your chip supports some of the extensions those vendors use. For
    example, Dassault certifies Quadro drivers for Solidworks.

    http://www.nvidia.com/page/partner_certified_drivers.html

    I've run into problems with my own Quadro FX1400 crashing in certain
    laser programming/bending applications, and it can be helped by drivers,
    but sometimes the software provider just has a crappy OpenGL
    implementation. I don't know specifically which CAD program you're
    using though.

    Also, with many Dell workstations, the default setting for onboard video
    can be Auto, which doesn't let you specify an amount, but it might be
    worthwhile to force 256MB or 128MB, etc.

    Also, be sure that your program is actually crashing the NVidia driver
    (as in using OpenGL). There are many legacy apps that still use
    software implementations and any crashes would be totally unrelated to
    the graphics chip.
     
    deimos, May 15, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. lbbss

    andy Guest

    Right click on My Computer, select Properties.
    Under Computer:, how many MB of RAM is shown?
    The difference between 2048 MB and that number is the amount of RAM
    allocated to video memory.
     
    andy, May 15, 2009
    #3
  4. lbbss

    lbbss Guest

    The specs for my system is Dell Optiplex 745 STD Dual core 2.4Ghz, ATI
    Radeon
    X1300 (256MB). I use Microstation V8i, I did not that problem in the
    older version of Microstation. But on the same token, a co-worker
    that has a stand alone video card, does not get the same crashing
    problem. But most of us have the on board video, which will crash in
    the 3D.
    is there an equivallent for ATI?

    How can you force it to use the 256MB? Dell workstation set to Auto?
    Are you referring to the Bios setting?
    How can I know if I am using the max 256MB? tx
     
    lbbss, May 16, 2009
    #4
  5. lbbss

    Paul Guest

    Your system potentially has two video solutions, one of which is
    disabled.

    The motherboard could have a Q965 with GMA3000 chipset graphics.
    That would use system memory, unless you disabled it because you'd
    installed a graphics card in the PCI Express x16 slot.

    http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/Op745/en/UG_en/index.htm

    The video card you say is in the box, also has a "mixed" memory
    capability. The X1300 is "Hypermemory" capable. There would be some
    smaller amount of memory soldered to the video card itself. In
    situations where the memory required is larger than the quantity of
    memory on the motherboard, the video subsystem can also use system
    memory. So it is possible to be using some of both. Or, it may
    be that the video card has a generous portion of RAM on board,
    and the Hypermemory feature is not used.

    http://ati.amd.com/technology/hypermemory.html

    In terms of test cases, I try to come up with tests using freely
    available software. To test basic platform stability, I use Prime95.
    This version is multithreaded, and using the "blended" stress test,
    it can test both the system memory and the processor, for error
    free operation. You don't want to see any errors detected, for at
    least a four hour run. You could start this running, before going
    home at the end of the day (assuming your IT staff don't have
    any weird practices regarding the operation of the machines - a
    Q965 could have remote control capabilities, so the IT staff can
    fool around if they want, like rebooting the machine in the middle
    of the night).

    http://majorgeeks.com/Prime95_d4363.html

    And while the following test does not test OpenGL, it does form
    a basic test of DirectX and the hardware. I use this benchmark
    as a way to check that my video cards work OK. A bad video card
    may "fall over" in the middle of the test. I picked this one,
    because it is a 40MB download. Later versions of 3DMark are
    more stressful, but may also be a larger download.

    http://majorgeeks.com/3Dmark_d99.html

    Another possibility, is some SPEC benchmarks, like SpecViewPerf.
    I haven't tried this before, and it is downloading as we speak.
    Download is 587MB. Any benchmark that runs, should also have
    the side effect, of verifying the correct operation of the
    hardware and software. This would be to test the OpenGL
    capabilities of my humble home computer.

    http://www.spec.org/gwpg/downloadindex.html
    http://www.opengl.org/resources/benchmarks/

    45cdfa71a2a2b8caaa6cd26e433a91b3 SPECViewperf10.exe (MD5SUM)

    The MD5SUM is included, as a way to verify that the file has
    not been modified. I'd really prefer it, if the SPEC people
    placed this value on their web page. (I found this value on
    the FTP site, which doesn't make it useful for verification.
    It should be available on the originating web site.)

    Paul
     
    Paul, May 16, 2009
    #5
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.