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Operating system not found

Discussion in 'IBM Thinkpad' started by koreantiger, Nov 23, 2006.

  1. koreantiger

    koreantiger Guest

    Help! My computer got the blue screen of death (BSOD). I rebooted 3-4
    times and it keeps saying OS not found. I have IBM product recovery
    disks that seem to have some utilities in there and I can boot into a
    DOS prompt. However, not sure what commands to use. Can someone help?
    I have data on the laptop that hasn't been backed up, so clean
    reinstall is NOT an option for me. Do I just need to repair Windows?
    I'm hoping it's not the hard drive and don't think it is.

    Thanks, Hyejin
     
    koreantiger, Nov 23, 2006
    #1
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  2. koreantiger

    Nick Danger Guest

    It could be various things. Only a lot of trial and error will tell. If
    you're lucky, it's just one corrupt file or maybe even a memory problem. But
    the most important thing you need to do now is back up your data. The
    simplest thing to do is to find someone else with a laptop computer, then
    get hold of a suitable caddy for the disk drive and slide it into the CD
    drive slot in their machine, and copy whatever files you need to save from
    your machine into a safe place. You don't want to boot any computer (either
    your own or any other computer you've borrowed) from that disk drive since,
    if it's corrupted, it could be getting more and more scrambled every time
    you start it up.

    After you've saved your files, I would recommend running a memory check
    program like memtest86, and then reinstalling Windows. There are options for
    repairing Windows or validity-checking your files, but this doesn't always
    fix everything. Even apart from your current problem, an occasional Windows
    reinstall is a good thing as it clears out a lot of the sludge that builds
    up at the bottom of the OS. If it passes the memory test and Windows
    reinstalls successfuly and all your apps run well, then you can enter a
    period of cautious optimism - and keep backing up your files. If you're
    lucky, it was just one random accident, and everything will be OK. If you
    start seeing the same problems, then you have to consider various hardware
    problems. Even after several hours of memtest86, there's still a possibility
    that you could have an undetected memory error. If you get errors but can
    still run Windows, then look at the system log for any indications of
    errors.

    But again - before doing anything else - get the necessary caddy or adapter
    so you can slide that disk into another computer as a second disk and copy
    your important files before doing anything else.
     
    Nick Danger, Nov 24, 2006
    #2
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  3. koreantiger

    kjfisher Guest

    Another approach to save off the files, would be to install the drive
    (assuming that it IS still ok) in one of the fairly cheap external USB
    drive enclosures for 2.5" drives) and connect it to the USB port on
    your desktop.

    I bought one a few weeks ago for $24.95 at Frys, mounted an old system
    drive from a Dell D600 notebook in it, and had no trouble reading and
    copying selected files to my desktop computer.

    Good Luck!

    Ken
     
    kjfisher, Nov 25, 2006
    #3
  4. koreantiger

    kjfisher Guest

    Another approach to save off the files, would be to install the drive
    (assuming that it IS still ok) in one of the fairly cheap external USB
    drive enclosures for 2.5" drives) and connect it to the USB port on
    your desktop.

    I bought one a few weeks ago for $24.95 at Frys, mounted an old system
    drive from a Dell D600 notebook in it, and had no trouble reading and
    copying selected files to my desktop computer.

    Good Luck!

    Ken
     
    kjfisher, Nov 25, 2006
    #4
  5. koreantiger

    News Guest



    You don't provide enough information to point to specifics, but this
    error could be thrown by several issues, one being a damaged Master Boot
    Record (MBR). The simplest way to repair or re-create the MBR is to run
    the Microsoft utility, included in MS-DOS, Windows 95/98/ME, FDISK with
    a parameter /MBR, such as:

    A:\> FDISK.EXE /MBR

    If you have Windows NT / 2000 / XP, you can boot from startup floppy
    disks or CDs, choose the "Repair" option during setup, and run the
    Recovery Console. Once logged on, run the FIXMBR command to fix the MBR.
     
    News, Nov 25, 2006
    #5
  6. koreantiger

    Tony Hwang Guest

    Hi,
    Safe mode·Î ÇØ º¸¼Ì´ÂÁö¿ä?
     
    Tony Hwang, Nov 27, 2006
    #6
  7. koreantiger

    koreantiger Guest

    Hi Tony and everyone else,

    I tried safe mode, but that didn't work. The computer just hung.

    The strange thing is that after turning the laptop on and off a few
    times it started up properly. I was able to back up everything. I
    couldn't run fdisk from a floppy because I have no floppy drive for
    this laptop. Nor could I do a Windows repair because all I have is the
    IBM recovery disks; no XP disk.

    After getting it to boot, it kept freezing at random times. The laptop
    has a history of many virus infections, which could be the cause of
    trouble. I ran a bunch of diagnostics and it passed every test,
    including hard drive. I decided to wipe the computer, which went well.
    So far so good. I have another question which I will start a new
    topic on.

    Thanks everyone,
    Hyejin
     
    koreantiger, Nov 27, 2006
    #7
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