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OT: a wooden computer (almost)

Discussion in 'Embedded' started by martin griffith, Jun 22, 2007.

  1. martin griffith, Jun 22, 2007
    #1
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  2. martin griffith

    larwe Guest

    larwe, Jun 22, 2007
    #2
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  3. Impressive. It's good to see Big companies having a sense sense of fun
    on their websites

    As soon as I hit send, I realised I should have called the post
    "gravity based computing", so no good for the ISS !


    martin
     
    martin griffith, Jun 22, 2007
    #3
  4. martin griffith

    Dave Hansen Guest

    Dave Hansen, Jun 22, 2007
    #4
  5. martin griffith

    larwe Guest

    Sorry to tell you that series got canned (I think). The reason I knew
    about the HRRG is because I proofread the first one or two articles.
    (I also write for developerWorks; you'll find probably 20 of my
    articles up there). Unfortunately they had a budget cut recently,
    which forced all the zones to focus on specific topics. That's why I'm
    now writing only about Cell BE programming; if you search for my name
    you'll find a lot of older material I wrote which is general fun and
    interest.
     
    larwe, Jun 22, 2007
    #5
  6. martin griffith, Jun 22, 2007
    #6
  7. martin griffith

    Guy Macon Guest

    On the island of Apraphul off the northwest coast of New Guinea,
    archaeologists discovered the rotting remnants of an ingenious
    arrangement of ropes and pulleys thought to be the first working
    digital computer ever constructed ... approximately A.D. 850.

    http://www.huyton.net/rope.html
     
    Guy Macon, Jun 22, 2007
    #7
  8. martin griffith

    Guy Macon Guest

  9. And doesn't "Apraphul" sound remarkably like "April fool"?
    (The article appeared in Scientific American, April 1988.)


    martin
     
    martin griffith, Jun 22, 2007
    #9
  10. martin griffith

    Guy Macon Guest

    Next you are going to tell me that I can't trust the Weekly World News...
     
    Guy Macon, Jun 22, 2007
    #10
  11. I know.... I did an april fools for Studio Sound ( uk pub.) in the
    80's, it was so convincing not one person spotted it, wish I still had
    a copy.

    But that Tesla thing looks impressive, and I did check the publication
    date before posting, maybe I should email it to that
    Skybuck(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning-Kruger_effect) person,
    just for fun, of course


    martin
     
    martin griffith, Jun 22, 2007
    #11
  12. Surely that is redated by the abacus for that particular accolade?
     
    Andrew Smallshaw, Jun 26, 2007
    #12
  13. martin griffith

    Brian Patrie Guest

    | On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 18:21:29 +0000, in comp.arch.embedded Guy Macon
    | <http://www.guymacon.com/> wrote:
    | >On the island of Apraphul off the northwest coast of New Guinea,
    | >archaeologists discovered the rotting remnants of an ingenious
    | >arrangement of ropes and pulleys thought to be the first working
    | >digital computer ever constructed ... approximately A.D. 850.
    | >http://www.huyton.net/rope.html
    |
    | And doesn't "Apraphul" sound remarkably like "April fool"?
    | (The article appeared in Scientific American, April 1988.)

    I thought it sounded a wee bit tooooo similar to current technology tendancies (8-bit, etc). The elephant bones pretty much sealed my doubts. Neat story though. :)
    --
     
    Brian Patrie, Jun 30, 2007
    #13
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