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[OT] Recomendation for LCD for Photo editing with Matrox P650?

Discussion in 'Matrox' started by aa.woods.excess, Dec 31, 2003.

  1. I am totally lost on finding an LCD which would be suitable for
    photo editing. I realize that a CRT might be better. However, my
    old Viewsonic PT775 is starting to go out and I have dreams of
    recapturing some desk space and losing the perch for cats. Gaming
    is not important. I am primarily interested in color accuracy.

    I have a Matrox P650 in an XP machine. Due to price, I am
    primarily looking at 17" monitors, but will consider one that is
    slightly larger if it is a good value.

    The reviews I have been looking at say that the color is actually
    better in analog than it is with digital. I believe that this is
    because of the lack of adjustments on the monitors when using
    DVI. However, I am guessing that these reviewers must not have
    been working with Matrox cards. It seems that Coloreal should
    adequately compensate for the lack of adjustments on the monitor
    in DVI. Is this true?
     
    aa.woods.excess, Dec 31, 2003
    #1
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  2. aa.woods.excess

    Rick Guest

    Lack of color gamut is a function of the backlight technology
    used in LCD monitors, it's not a function of video controllers.
    Unless you have the better part of $3000 to spend, you won't
    get proper near-blacks and near-whites on an LCD. Period.

    Rick
     
    Rick, Dec 31, 2003
    #2
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  3. aa.woods.excess

    Arthur Hagen Guest

    Even then, you won't get a solution that can display _nearly_ as large part
    of the colour spectrum as a CRT monitor. The LCDs simply don't have the
    ability to display all the nuances.

    Regards,
     
    Arthur Hagen, Dec 31, 2003
    #3
  4. Unfortunately, I have no way of checking these statements out in
    person. The CRTs carried in stores around here are low grade,
    mostly the viewsonic A series. The LCDs are also a disgrace.
    There doesn't seem to be a store that caries the good stuff on
    the east side of San Francisco Bay.

    Rumor has it that better 17" LCDs do exist for about $600 to $750
    (US). For example, Tom's Hardware says of the Samsung SyncMaster
    172X (approx. $600 US): "The screen can reproduce 99% of colors.
    Only black, true, pure black cannot be shown. 98% of the colors
    (DeltaE < 2) are correctly displayed, 93% (DeltaE < 1) are
    perfect." While this may not be as good as the very best CRT, it
    doesn't sound exactly horrendous. Unfortunately, I cannot find
    one anywhere around here. It would be nice to see what a few of
    my own pictures would look like.
     
    aa.woods.excess, Jan 1, 2004
    #4
  5. aa.woods.excess

    Rick Guest

    Most images contain at least some blacks or near-blacks, so the
    reviewer is simply playing a numbers game -- it's not the 99%
    (or 98%, or 93%, or whatever) that's the problem, it's the other
    few percent.

    The bottom line is that decent CRTs such as the Sony F520 or
    Mitsubishi 2070 have contrast ratios which exceed 750:1 or
    800:1, while the best consumer-grade LCDs max out at around
    600:1 (most range from 400:1 or 450:1). That equates to
    around HALF to TWO-THIRDS the color gamut of even a
    midrange CRT. It's the primary reason one doesn't see pro
    photographers or photo labs using LCDs for image editing.

    Rick
     
    Rick, Jan 1, 2004
    #5
  6. The Sony F520 is 21" and sells for $1600. That might work for a
    professional. It is not relevant for an amateur.

    The Mitsubishi 2070 would be worth considering if it weren't a
    22" CRT. Mitsubishi does make the 19" Diamond Pro 930. However,
    I have not seen any reviews.

    With a CRT, I would prefer to keep it to 17" because of the
    depth of the larger monitors. Eizo's T566 has had good reviews.
    Unfortunately, their distribution in the US is almost
    non-existent. It makes me wonder how long the company will be
    around.
     
    aa.woods.excess, Jan 1, 2004
    #6
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